• genome
  • This means we're able to label different parts of the virus genome and track replication of its RNA inside the host insect. (newswise.com)
  • The coding region of the genome codes for three structural proteins and seven nonstructural (NS) proteins, proteins that are not incorporated into the structure of new viruses. (wikipedia.org)
  • The WNV genome is first translated into a polyprotein and later cleaved by virus and host proteases into separate proteins (i.e. (wikipedia.org)
  • As in other flaviviruses, such as the similarly sized West Nile virus, the RNA genome encodes seven nonstructural proteins and three structural proteins. (wikipedia.org)
  • outbreak
  • Phylogenetic studies indicate that the virus spreading in the Americas is 89% identical to African genotypes, but is most closely related to the Asian strain that circulated in French Polynesia during the 2013-2014 outbreak. (wikipedia.org)
  • During the 2014 West Africa Ebola virus outbreak, it was reported that a French nurse who contracted Ebola while volunteering for MSF in Liberia recovered after receiving a course of favipiravir. (wikipedia.org)
  • County Judge Clay Jenkins declared a public health emergency for the county on August 9, 2012, due to the West Nile virus outbreak in the area. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1999
  • Rhodes said according to the Illinois Department of Public Health, the West Nile virus emerged in New York in 1999 and the first case reported in Illinois was in 2001 in the Chicago area. (pontiacdailyleader.com)
  • The virus was discovered in Uganda in 1937 and was first detected in North America in 1999. (wikipedia.org)
  • United States: From 1999 through 2001, the CDC confirmed 149 West Nile virus infections, including 18 deaths. (wikipedia.org)
  • outbreaks
  • In areas where yellow fever is common and vaccination is uncommon, early diagnosis of cases and immunization of large parts of the population is important to prevent outbreaks. (wikipedia.org)
  • viral
  • One promising approach to combat these viruses and prevent them from causing disease is to develop drugs that inhibit the viral NS3 protease. (worldcommunitygrid.org)
  • deaths
  • Last year, the state says there were 43 serious illnesses and three deaths related to West Nile virus in Michigan. (wsbt.com)
  • For the 2012 season, IDPH reported the second highest number of West Nile virus human cases in state history with 290 residents and 12 deaths. (il.us)
  • 17 people have either tested positive or are suspected of having the virus in Saskatchewan, and only one person has tested positive in Alberta.Saskatchewan has reported 826 cases of WNV plus three deaths. (wikipedia.org)
  • infectious
  • To explore the biological mechanisms behind pathogen blocking, Newton and colleagues designed a model system consisting of Wolbachia -infected fruit flies and the Sindbis virus, which is easier -- and safer -- to manipulate in the lab than infectious agents such as the Zika or West Nile viruses. (newswise.com)
  • The rest of the virus is assembled along the endoplasmic reticulum and through the Golgi apparatus, and results in non-infectious immature virions. (wikipedia.org)
  • replication
  • The NS3 protease is an enzyme critical for virus replication, and its amino acid sequence and atomic structure are very similar among the different disease-causing flaviviruses. (worldcommunitygrid.org)
  • Replication follows the positive stranded RNA virus replication model. (wikipedia.org)
  • vectors
  • As the impacts of disease and virus are devastating, the need to control the vectors in which they carried is prioritized. (wikipedia.org)
  • disease
  • Rocky Mountain spotted fever is another tick-borne disease, which is caused by the bacteria Rickettsia rickettsii. (nyhq.org)
  • West Nile fever (WNF) has been assessed according to the criteria of the Animal Health Law (AHL), in particular criteria of Article 7 on disease profile and impacts, Article 5 on the eligibility of WNF to be listed, Article 9 for the categorisation of WNF according to disease prevention and control rules as in Annex IV and Article 8 on the list of animal species related to WNF. (europa.eu)
  • A clinical trial investigating the use of favipiravir against Ebola virus disease was started in Guéckédou, Guinea, during December 2014. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 15% of cases, however, people enter a second, toxic phase of the disease with recurring fever, this time accompanied by jaundice due to liver damage, as well as abdominal pain. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first human West Nile disease in 2003 occurred in June, and one West Nile-infected blood transfusion was also identified that month. (wikipedia.org)
  • Immunity
  • This publication, 'Viruses, Immunity and Immunodeficiency,' is based on the first symposium in a series of International Biomedical Symposia sponsored by the College of Medicine of the University of South Florida in Tampa, Florida. (google.com)
  • This has come about because of the recognition that the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome, which has taken biomedical scientists and the public in general by surprise, is just one of the many examples that viruses can influence the immune response system and, under appropriate circumstances, alter immunity in such a way that an infected individual becomes hi~lly susceptible to a variety of other organisms to which normal individuals would be resistant. (google.com)
  • cases
  • The virus was first recorded in Oklahoma in 2002 with 15 cases, jumping to 79 cases in 2003. (ksn.com)
  • To date this season, WNV-positive mosquito pools have been confirmed in parts of Boulder, Adams, Delta, Mesa, Pueblo and Weld counties, with two other human cases of the virus being reported in Colorado. (dailycamera.com)
  • West Nile fever (WNF), which occurs in 20 percent of cases, is a febrile syndrome that causes flu-like symptoms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since the 1980s, the number of cases of yellow fever has been increasing. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2008, West Nile surveillance data reported to CDC, a total of 28 states have reported 236 cases of human WNV illness. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2011 the virus spread to central Greece but with fewer cases, 101 diagnosed and 9 fatalities. (wikipedia.org)
  • case
  • Today [8 Apr the Mississippi State Department of Health (MSDH) reports the state's 1st human case of West Nile virus (WNV) for 2013. (blogspot.com)
  • OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) - Despite a wetter than normal spring and early summer, there has yet to be a reported human case of the potentially deadly West Nile virus, according to the Oklahoma State Department of Health. (ksn.com)
  • A Niwot-area resident is Boulder County's first confirmed West Nile virus case of 2014, Boulder County Public Health officials said Wednesday. (dailycamera.com)
  • The first case of human-contracted West Nile virus in Livingston County was reported by health officials Friday. (pontiacdailyleader.com)
  • This is the only known case ever reported in Livingston County, but it may not be the only case," Rhodes said, explaining that symptoms of West Nile could be confused for a case of flu. (pontiacdailyleader.com)
  • SPRINGFIELD - The Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) has confirmed the first human West Nile virus case reported in central Illinois for 2013. (il.us)
  • risk
  • The West Nile virus season is considered to be May through November in Oklahoma, with the greatest risk from July through October, according to the Health Department. (ksn.com)
  • Preliminary results showed a decrease in mortality rate in patients with low-to-moderate levels of Ebola virus in the blood, but no effect on patients with high levels of the virus, a group at a higher risk of death. (wikipedia.org)
  • fungus
  • Later it transpired that the virus was transmitted by the zoospores of the fungus and also survived in the resting spores. (wikipedia.org)