• toxicity
  • As a consequence of the leaching process, ground water from the Valley of Neuquen River frequently contained concentrations of organophosphorus pesticides that exceeded acute toxicity risk ratios established to protect aquatic life. (biomedsearch.com)
  • metabolism
  • Under some circumstances, microbial metabolism can consume dissolved oxygen faster than atmospheric oxygen can dissolve into the water or the autotrophic community (algae, cyanobacteria and macrophytes) can produce. (wikipedia.org)
  • Biological
  • Combining information over the six years of monitoring showed 34 +/- 4% of the Atlantic and Gulf estuarine sediments displayed poorer than expected biological conditions, based on benthic and finfish community conditions, and 21 +/- 4% of the area was characterized by low water clarity, the presence of marine debris/noxious odors, or elevated fish tissue contaminants. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Environmental monitoring of THMs in water and ambient air was also performed in order to assess the possible correlation between environmental and biological samples. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Biological factors also contribute to the breakdown of certain pollutants. (wikipedia.org)
  • contaminants
  • Mussel Watch monitors the concentration of contaminants in bivalves (mussels and oysters) and sediments in the coastal waters of the U.S., including the Great Lakes, to monitor bivalve health and by extension the health of their local and regional environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Water is typically referred to as polluted when it is impaired by anthropogenic contaminants and either does not support a human use, such as drinking water, or undergoes a marked shift in its ability to support its constituent biotic communities, such as fish. (wikipedia.org)
  • streams
  • A legacy of serious environmental problems has beset the area from the time the canal arose from the local tidal wetlands and fresh water streams. (wikipedia.org)
  • toxic
  • The Sandoz chemical spill was a major environmental disaster caused by a fire and its subsequent extinguishing at Sandoz agrochemical storehouse in the Schweizerhalle industrial complex, Basel-Landschaft, Switzerland, on 1 November 1986, which released toxic agrochemicals into the air and resulted in tons of pollutants entering the Rhine river, turning it red. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pesticides
  • As a part of landscape-scale study, ground water samples were collected from 30 wells located in fruit production farms belonging to the valley of Neuquen river during the period 1995-1998 and analyzed for organophosphate pesticides. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Depending
  • Depending on their chemical composition, plastics and resins have varying properties related to contaminant absorption and adsorption. (wikipedia.org)
  • concentrations
  • The low levels of Hg are due to the low levels of the Hg in the fish from the family Comephoride, which reflect the very low concentrations of Hg in Baikal water. (biomedsearch.com)
  • fate
  • The second half of the seminar will consider the opportunities to use carbonaceous materials to alter the bioavailability and fate of chemicals. (bath.ac.uk)
  • substances
  • Foreign substances such as chemical pollutants that cause an alteration of sex have been found in growing prevalence in the circulating waters of the world. (wikipedia.org)
  • While many of the chemicals and substances that are regulated may be naturally occurring (calcium, sodium, iron, manganese, etc.) the concentration is often the key in determining what is a natural component of water and what is a contaminant. (wikipedia.org)
  • shallow
  • The water's flow path, along with the wide and shallow ditch, is designed to maximize the time water spends in the swale, which aids the trapping of pollutants and silt. (wikipedia.org)
  • During this process, decomposing microbes deplete the shallow water of all oxygen, suffocating larger decomposers. (wikipedia.org)
  • downstream
  • The chemicals caused a massive mortality of wildlife downstream, killing among other things a large proportion of the European eel population in the Rhine, although the situation subsequently recovered within a couple of years. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Siam Chemicals Public Company (SCC) blends and trades chemicals, fertilisers and lubricants and manufactures basic chemicals for downstream industries such as sulfuric acid, hydrochloric acid, various bases and salts. (wikipedia.org)
  • He wanted to become the first producer of chemicals for the downstream industry in Thailand such as sulphuric acid and agricultural fertilizers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Marine
  • This can be seen on the local level in Washington State where The Snohomish County's Natural Marine Resources Committee coordinated with the Mussel Watch program in 2007 to employ citizens to collect samples from the nearshore water Snohomish County. (wikipedia.org)
  • oxygen
  • Further south then are areas of oxygen depletion, caused by chemicals using up oxygen and by algae blooms, caused by excess nutrients from algal cell death and decomposition. (blogspot.com)
  • The S-Chem Group was set-up in 2010 as a group of companies with the same core management for Siam Fine Chemicals Co. Ltd, SFS Aviation Co., Ltd, the Southern Oxygen Co. Ltd., ChiraTech Maxima Research Group and the Phoenix Petroleum Co., Ltd. Business Development. (wikipedia.org)
  • To get oxygen, they extend a long snorkel to the water surface, pumping air into their lungs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Supply
  • On May 26, 1664, several Breuckelen residents, headed by Brouwer, petitioned director general Peter Stuyvesant and his Council for permission to dredge a canal at their own expense through the land of Frederick Lubbertsen in order to supply water to run the mill. (wikipedia.org)
  • Scientists believe that these chemicals present in the water supply leads to increasing feminizing effects in male fish. (wikipedia.org)
  • Two years later, the EPA began to investigate how the pollutant had contaminated the water supply of the area. (wikipedia.org)
  • environment
  • These dynamics govern the opportunities for pollutants to move through the environment and to be degraded. (bath.ac.uk)
  • This was later standardised at 68 °F and then 20 °C. This temperature may be significantly different from the temperature of the natural environment of the water being tested. (wikipedia.org)
  • nutrients
  • Principal sources of these nutrients are excess fertilization, which can cause eutrophication in receiving waters. (wikipedia.org)
  • Unlike other decomposing animals, the apple snail have both gills and lungs, making it possible for them to thrive in anoxic waters where they recycle the nutrients. (wikipedia.org)
  • algae
  • Natural phenomena such as volcanoes, algae blooms, storms, and earthquakes also cause major changes in water quality and the ecological status of water. (wikipedia.org)
  • major
  • Among the major resulting water pollutants were dinitro-ortho-cresol, the organophosphate chemicals propetamphos, parathion, disulfoton, thiometon, etrimphos and fenitrothion, as well as the organochlorine metoxuron. (wikipedia.org)
  • eventually
  • Any remaining surface water eventually flows into a receiving water body such as a river, lake, estuary or ocean. (wikipedia.org)
  • Eventually, these abandoned nets become too difficult to remove from the water because they become too heavy, having grown in weight up to 6 tons. (wikipedia.org)
  • levels
  • The water near Triana was monitored by the EPA from 1982-1995 to track the levels of DDT that was still in the Huntsville Spring Branch. (wikipedia.org)
  • storm
  • The CWA definition of point source was amended in 1987 to include municipal storm sewer systems, as well as industrial storm water, such as from construction sites. (wikipedia.org)
  • bodies
  • Once a busy cargo transportation hub, the canal is now recognized as one of the most polluted bodies of water in the United States, and is a Superfund site. (wikipedia.org)
  • Source
  • Another source from which pollutants originate is fossil-fuel combustion. (wikipedia.org)
  • Occasionally you can see the locals fill cans and other containers on carts here, with this apparently very drinkable source of water, for their domestic use. (wikipedia.org)
  • A roadway travelled by motor vehicles can be idealized by a line source emitting air pollutants. (wikipedia.org)
  • study
  • Indicator filter feeding species such as copepods have also been used to study pollutant fates in the New York Bight, for example. (blogspot.com)
  • A 2004 study by Richard Thompson from the University of Plymouth, UK, found a great amount of microdebris on the beaches and waters in Europe, the Americas, Australia, Africa, and Antarctica. (wikipedia.org)
  • mill
  • The tide-water gristmill on the Gowanus was the first in the town of Breukelen and was the first mill ever operated in New Netherland (located north of Union Street, west of Nevins Street, and next to Bond Street). (wikipedia.org)
  • slowly
  • Flood waters tend to flow slowly (2 to 10 cm (0.79 to 3.94 in) per second) due to the low gradients and high resistance offered by the dense vegetation. (wikipedia.org)