• diseases
  • Academic Book: Classroom Lectures on Human Viral Diseases Presented at the City University of New York. (mellenpress.com)
  • This college level instructional aid is a concise yet comprehensible review of human viral diseases specifically designed for beginning microbiology instructors and their students. (mellenpress.com)
  • At the same time, this text presents itself as a valuable resource for students of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases as well as for anyone in need of a thorough primer on human viral diseases. (mellenpress.com)
  • The other causes of encephalitis include noninfectious inflammatory conditions caused by autoimmune diseases and trauma. (epainassist.com)
  • The Central Nervous System viral diseases are caused by viruses that attack the CNS. (wikipedia.org)
  • While acute viral diseases come on quickly, chronic viral conditions have long incubation periods inside the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most common diseases caused by chronic viral infections are subacute-sclerosing panencephalitis, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, retrovirus disease and spongiform encephalopathies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Development of new therapies has been hindered by the lack of appropriate animal model systems for some important viruses and also because of the difficulty in conducting human clinical trials for diseases that are rare. (wikipedia.org)
  • Viruses of plants and livestock also increased, and as humans became dependent on agriculture and farming, diseases such as potyviruses of potatoes and rinderpest of cattle had devastating consequences. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the 20th century many diseases both old and new were found to be caused by viruses. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although scientific interest in them arose because of the diseases they cause, most viruses are beneficial. (wikipedia.org)
  • Over the past 50,000-100,000 years, as modern humans increased in numbers and dispersed throughout the world, new infectious diseases emerged, including those caused by viruses. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other epidemics of viral diseases that depend on large concentrations of people, such as mumps, rubella and polio, also first occurred at this time. (wikipedia.org)
  • West Nile
  • Two well-known vector-borne illnesses in Canada are West Nile virus and Lyme disease. (cpha.ca)
  • It is the second most reported mosquito-borne disease in North America behind West Nile virus. (cpha.ca)
  • Chen CC, Jenkins E, Epp T, Waldner C, Curry PS, Soos C. Climate change and West Nile virus in a highly endemic region of North America. (cpha.ca)
  • The West Nile virus (WNV) can cause encephalitis and is related to St. Louis encephalitis (SLE). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Are you sure your patient has West Nile virus (WNV) disease? (cancertherapyadvisor.com)
  • West Nile virus was accidentally introduced into the United States in 1999 and by 2003 had spread to almost every state with over 3,000 cases in 2006. (wikipedia.org)
  • The discovery of the West Nile virus came in 1937, and has since been found in Culex populations causing epidemics throughout Africa, the Middle East, and Europe. (wikipedia.org)
  • An example of this vector-host relationship can be observed in the transmission of the West Nile virus. (wikipedia.org)
  • encodes
  • The large segment of related bunyaviruses is approximately 6800 bases in length and encodes a probable viral polymerase. (wikipedia.org)
  • The L segment encodes the RNA Dependent RNA-polymerase, necessary for viral RNA replication and mRNA synthesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • The M segment encodes the viral glycoproteins, which project from the viral surface and aid the virus in attaching to and entering the host cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • Polymerase
  • Blood test Urine analysis Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing of the cerebrospinal fluid, to detect the presence of viral DNA which is a sign of viral encephalitis. (wikipedia.org)
  • The viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase is encoded by the L protein which contains conserved characteristic motifs throughout all the RNA-dependent, RNA-polymerases. (wikipedia.org)
  • The RNA-dependent, RNA-polymerase brought along with the virus initially binds to a promoter on the L and S segments and begins transcription from negative-stranded to a positive-stranded mRNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aedes
  • First isolation of La Crosse virus from naturally infected Aedes albopictus . (cpha.ca)
  • LAC virus is a zoonotic pathogen cycled between the daytime-biting treehole mosquito, Aedes triseriatus , and vertebrate amplifier hosts (chipmunks, tree squirrels) in deciduous forest habitats. (wikipedia.org)
  • An explanation to this may be that the mosquito Aedes albopictus is also an efficient vector of La Crosse virus. (wikipedia.org)
  • The virus is mostly found in woodland habitats, between the treehole mosquito (Aedes triseriatus) and vertebrate hosts (such as chipmunks and squirrels). (shelbycountytn.gov)
  • occurs
  • Death from LAC encephalitis occurs in less than 1% of clinical cases. (wikipedia.org)
  • A primary spread of virus occurs, with seeding of the reticuloendothelial system, mainly in the liver, spleen, and lymph nodes. (wikipedia.org)
  • With the ongoing replication of the virus a secondary spread occurs, with the seeding of the CNS. (wikipedia.org)
  • Replication
  • After the virus enters the body via a mosquito bite, the virus undergoes local replication at the skin site where virus entered the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • Not all the cases reach this stage, depending on the efficiency of viral replication at the different stages and the degree of virus spread. (wikipedia.org)
  • When LCMV attacks a cell, the process of replication starts by attachment of the virus to host receptors through its surface glycoproteins. (wikipedia.org)