• stems
  • The watermelon is a large annual plant with long, weak, trailing or climbing stems which are five-angled (five-sided) and up to 3 m (10 ft) long. (wikipedia.org)
  • A vine (Latin vīnea "grapevine", "vineyard", from vīnum "wine") in the narrowest sense is the grapevine (Vitis), and more generally, any plant with a growth habit of trailing or scandent (that is, climbing) stems, lianas or runners. (wikipedia.org)
  • A vine displays a growth form based on long stems. (wikipedia.org)
  • It has evolved independently in several plant families, using many different climbing methods such as: twining their stems around a support (e.g., morning glories, Ipomoea species). (wikipedia.org)
  • The vine-like stems spread in all directions for a few meters looking for something over which to climb. (wikipedia.org)
  • Wild grape vine (Vitis species) The wild grapevine climbs with the aid of "tendrils" on stems that are hairy when young but grow into hairless vines. (wildernessarena.com)
  • tendrils
  • Clematis species) using tendrils, which can be specialized shoots (Vitaceae), leaves (Bignoniaceae), or even inflorescences (Passiflora) using tendrils which also produce adhesive pads at the end that attach themselves quite strongly to the support (Parthenocissus) using thorns (e.g. climbing rose) or other hooked structures, such as hooked branches (e.g. (wikipedia.org)
  • Artabotrys hexapetalus) The climbing fetterbush (Pieris phillyreifolia) is a woody shrub-vine which climbs without clinging roots, tendrils, or thorns. (wikipedia.org)
  • A twining vine, also known as a bine, is a climbing plant that climbs by its shoots growing in a helix, in contrast other vines which climb using tendrils or suckers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Almost all members of the family are annual herbs that grow as climbing or prostrate vines with spirally coiled tendrils. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • botanists
  • Its fruit, which is also called watermelon , is a special kind referred to by botanists as a pepo , a berry which has a thick rind ( exocarp ) and fleshy center (mesocarp and endocarp). (blogspot.com)
  • Seedless
  • Seedless watermelons were initially developed in 1939 by Japanese scientists who were able to create seedless triploid hybrids which remained rare initially because they did not have sufficient disease resistance. (wikipedia.org)
  • Seedless watermelons became more popular in the 21st century, rising to nearly 85% of total watermelon sales in the United States in 2014. (wikipedia.org)
  • fruit
  • It is grown in tropical and subtropical areas worldwide for its large edible fruit, also known as a watermelon, which is a special kind of berry with a hard rind and no internal division, botanically called a pepo. (wikipedia.org)
  • Major pests of the watermelon include aphids, fruit flies and root-knot nematodes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Additionally, other wild species have bitter fruit containing cucurbitacin. (wikipedia.org)
  • The generic name Citrullus is the diminutive of Citrus , perhaps referring to the spherical fruit. (worldwidefruits.com)
  • It is grown for its edible fruit, also known as a watermelon , which is a special kind of berry botanically called a pepo . (worldwidefruits.com)
  • While watermelon might not rank very high on your personal list of foods with great diversity, this fruit is far more diverse than many people suspect. (whfoods.com)
  • However, you'll typically want to make sure that a watermelon is sufficiently ripe before purchasing it in order to receive great texture and flavor from this fruit. (whfoods.com)
  • Present findings confined to 10 fruit plant species belonging to 10 genera of 9 families. (scribd.com)
  • Eggplant (Solanum melongena) or aubergine is a species of nightshade grown for its edible fruit. (combiculture.com)
  • Lesions
  • Gray-green to black circular leaf spots Angular/target-like water-soaked lesions Stem lesions/cankers Vine lesions Vine Necrosis Reddish gummy ooze exuding from the lesions/wounds Wilt Defoliation The first symptoms appear as grayish green, circular spots between the veins of the leaf lobes . (wikipedia.org)
  • Lesions begin to develop on vines at the vine nodes and then elongate into water-soaked streaks, and these streaks are pale brown at first but turn gray with time . (wikipedia.org)
  • lianas
  • These may be divided into woody vines or lianas, such as wisteria, kiwifruit, and common ivy, and herbaceous (nonwoody) vines, such as morning glory. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most of the plants in this family are annual vines, but some are woody lianas, thorny shrubs, or trees (Dendrosicyos). (wikipedia.org)
  • susceptible
  • The list is organized by the scientific name of the pathogen species (CAPITAL LETTERS), followed by the various susceptible plant hosts. (hawaii.edu)
  • aphids
  • This virus is primarily transmitted non-persistently by many species of aphids and can take most members of the Cucurbitacea family and many leguminous species as hosts. (wikipedia.org)
  • Watermelon mosaic virus can be transmitted in multiple ways including vector transmission or physical interactions of a person or tool, but the primary means of transmission is through Aphids. (wikipedia.org)
  • family
  • Calla Lily Cauliflower is one f several vegetables in the species Brassica Oleracea within the family Brassicaceae. (prezi.com)
  • Cauliflower Broccoli is a plant in the species Brassica Oleracea within the Cabbage Family. (prezi.com)
  • Arabidopsis is a member of the mustard (Brassicaceae) family, which includes cultivated species such as cabbage and radish. (cbd.int)
  • plants
  • Watermelons are tropical or subtropical plants and need temperatures higher than about 25 °C (77 °F) to thrive. (wikipedia.org)
  • A time of at least daily six hours of sun exposure is to the top requirements allowing plants to grow into green vines and occupy a lot of space. (gardenercorner.com)
  • In parts of the world, the term "vine" applies almost exclusively to the grapevine, While the term "climber" is used for all climbing plants. (wikipedia.org)
  • Certain plants always grow as vines, while a few grow as vines only part of the time. (wikipedia.org)
  • A vine may use rock exposures, other plants, or other supports for growth rather than investing energy in a lot of supportive tissue, enabling the plant to reach sunlight with a minimum investment of energy. (wikipedia.org)
  • The vine growth form may also enable plants to colonize large areas quickly, even without climbing high. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most vines are flowering plants. (wikipedia.org)
  • He classified five classes of vines including twining plants, leaf climbers, tendril bearers, root climbers and hook climbers. (wikipedia.org)
  • The diverse flora includes 8,000 species of flowering plants, 1,000 kinds of ferns, and 800 species of orchids. (wikipedia.org)
  • The plants typically grow to 1-3 meters (3-10 ft) in height and have a weak stem that often sprawls over the ground and vines over other plants. (combiculture.com)
  • Komuro, 1962), and until recently Watermelon mosaic virus type 2 (WMV-2), is a plant pathogenic virus that causes viral infection (sometimes referred to as watermelon Mosaic disease) in many different plants. (wikipedia.org)
  • This region has 4,004 species of plants from 1201 genera in 182 families. (wikipedia.org)
  • shrubs
  • For instance, poison ivy and bittersweet can grow as low shrubs when support is not available, but will become vines when support is available. (wikipedia.org)
  • Wild fig (Ficus species) Collectively known as "fig trees" or "figs", there are nearly 1,000 species of Ficus ranging from woody trees to shrubs and vines. (wildernessarena.com)
  • Bailey
  • Although this error only occurred in 1930 (Bailey, Gentes Herbarum 2: 180-186), it has been perpetuated in hundreds of papers on the watermelon. (wikipedia.org)
  • tomatoes
  • Recent studies have made it clear that, on average, red-fleshed watermelon is more concentrated in lycopene than red tomatoes. (whfoods.com)
  • While both foods are top-rated sources of this carotenoid, red-fleshed watermelons typically average between 4-5 milligrams of lycopene in every 100 grams (approximately two-thirds cup in volume), while red tomatoes usually contain about 3-4 milligrams per 100 grams (approximately 1/2 cup in volume). (whfoods.com)
  • soil
  • The sandy soil near the sea and the alluvial one on the riverbank are ideal for watermelons. (gardenercorner.com)
  • A vine can root in the soil but have most of its leaves in the brighter, exposed area, getting the best of both environments. (wikipedia.org)
  • vegetables
  • In commercial agriculture, they are a particular problem for growers of crucifers, grapes and vegetables that grow on vines. (wikipedia.org)
  • commonly
  • Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a species of bacteria that causes tumors (commonly known as 'galls' or 'crown galls') in dicots. (cbd.int)