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  • shunts
  • Treatment involves control of variceal bleeding (usually with endoscopic banding, IV octreotide , or both), prevention of recurrence using beta-blockers, and sometimes surgical shunts and thrombolysis for acute thrombosis. (merckmanuals.com)
  • occlusion
  • Portal vein thrombosis refers to either thrombotic or non-thrombotic occlusion of the portal vein as well as cavernoma formation. (springer.com)
  • Recently, an expert consensus has proposed a new classification system for PVT based on the site, clinical presentation (acute or chronic), degree of occlusion i.e. (partial or complete) and extent (extension into the splenic or superior mesenteric veins), symptomatic or asymptomatic as well as based on the type of underlying liver disease. (springer.com)
  • Additionally, complete lobar portal vein occlusion of either lobe would preclude expected increases in FLR from PVE due to already existing diversion of portal flow. (wikipedia.org)
  • arterial
  • Venous thrombosis leads to congestion of the affected part of the body, while arterial thrombosis (and rarely severe venous thrombosis) affects the blood supply and leads to damage of the tissue supplied by that artery (ischemia and necrosis). (wikipedia.org)
  • Thrombosis is generally defined by the type of blood vessel affected (arterial or venous thrombosis) and the precise location of the blood vessel or the organ supplied by it. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Arterial thrombosis is the formation of a thrombus within an artery. (wikipedia.org)
  • In most cases, arterial thrombosis follows rupture of atheroma (a fat-rich deposit in the blood vessel wall), and is therefore referred to as atherothrombosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • In these models, EETs prevent arterial occlusive diseases such as heart attacks and brain strokes not only by their anti-hypertension action but possibly also by their anti-inflammatory effects on blood vessels, their inhibition of platelet activation and thereby blood clotting, and/or their promotion of pro-fibrinolytic removal of blood clots. (wikipedia.org)
  • cholangiocarcinoma
  • Other indications for treatment are those who have unresectable HCC, HCC with partial or branch portal vein thrombosis, unresectable cholangiocarcinoma, metastatic neuroendocrine tumors, HCC patients who are currently ineligible for liver transplant, Y-90 can be used to decreases tumor size allowing patients to be candidates. (wikipedia.org)
  • peritoneal
  • This is due to increased hydrostatic pressure within the blood vessels of the hepatic portal system, which in turn forces water into the peritoneal cavity but leaves proteins such as albumin within the vasculature. (wikipedia.org)
  • Embolization
  • Long-Term Patency of Arteriovenous Fistulae Salvaged by Balloon Angioplasty with and without Accessory Vein Embolization: A Retrospective Study. (amedeo.com)
  • Portal vein embolization (PVE) is a preoperative procedure performed in interventional radiology to initiate hypertrophy of the anticipated future liver remnant a couple weeks prior to a major liver resection procedure. (wikipedia.org)
  • venous thrombosis
  • Pathology List of pathologists Jean Cruveilhier @ Who Named It Ojeda Reyes, Félix, El Desterrado de París, ISBN 094234748X pp. 20, 29-30 McAlpine's Multiple Sclerosis: Texte Imprimé By Douglas MacAlpine The Aetiology of Deep Venous Thrombosis by P. Colm Malone, Paul S. Agutter Mondofacto Dictionary (definition of eponyms) Basic Human Anatomy - O'Rahilly, Müller, Carpenter & Swenson Glossary of eponyms Cruveilhier's plexus Original Publication Dr Léon Delhoume, L' École de Dupuytren - Jean Cruveilhier. (wikipedia.org)
  • Embolization: Placement of a metallic coil or embolic substance (gel-foam, poly-vinyl alcohol) to block blood through to a blood vessel, either to stop bleeding or decrease blood flow to a target organ or tissue.Uterine artery embolization (UAE) or uterine fibroid embolization (UFE) Prostate artery embolization (PAE) Thrombolysis: Catheter-directed technique for dissolving blood clots, such as pulmonary embolism, deep venous thrombosis) with either pharmaceutical (TPA) or mechanical means. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is used in for example: Carotid ultrasonography Ultrasonography of deep venous thrombosis Ultrasonography of chronic venous insufficiency of the legs Duplex evaluation is usually done prior to any invasive testing or surgical procedure. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thrombosis may occur in veins (venous thrombosis) or in arteries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Venous thrombosis leads to congestion of the affected part of the body, while arterial thrombosis (and rarely severe venous thrombosis) affects the blood supply and leads to damage of the tissue supplied by that artery (ischemia and necrosis). (wikipedia.org)
  • Thrombosis is generally defined by the type of blood vessel affected (arterial or venous thrombosis) and the precise location of the blood vessel or the organ supplied by it. (wikipedia.org)
  • artery
  • This results in the illogical appearance of a vessel being partly a vein and partly an artery. (wikipedia.org)
  • When a blood vessel (a vein or an artery) is injured, the body uses platelets (thrombocytes) and fibrin to form a blood clot to prevent blood loss. (wikipedia.org)
  • fever
  • Treatment is with a prolonged course of broad-spectrum antibiotics, with the addition of anticoagulants if other clots are present outside the portal vein or if fever persists on antibiotic therapy. (wikipedia.org)
  • drain
  • Perforator veins drain from the superficial to the deep veins. (wikipedia.org)
  • The facial veins in this area anastomose with the superior and inferior ophthalmic veins of the orbit, which drain directly posteriorly into the cavernous sinus through the superior orbital fissure. (wikipedia.org)
  • usually
  • Veins are translucent, so the color a vein appears from an organism's exterior is determined in large part by the color of venous blood, which is usually dark red as a result of its low oxygen content. (wikipedia.org)
  • occur
  • Though characterized by a sharp pain at the site of the vein, it can prove difficult to diagnose, because it can occur at random. (wikipedia.org)
  • Deep
  • Communicating veins are veins that directly connect superficial veins to deep veins. (wikipedia.org)
  • The colour of a vein can be affected by the characteristics of a person's skin, how much oxygen is being carried in the blood, and how big and deep the vessels are. (wikipedia.org)
  • Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is the formation of a blood clot within a deep vein. (wikipedia.org)
  • Three factors are important in the formation of a blood clot within a deep vein-these are the rate of blood flow, the thickness of the blood and qualities of the vessel wall. (wikipedia.org)
  • form
  • After taking up cellular waste and carbon dioxide in capillaries, blood is channeled through vessels that converge with one another to form venules, which continue to converge and form the larger veins. (wikipedia.org)
  • flow
  • This is particularly useful in cardiovascular studies (sonography of the vascular system and heart) and essential in many areas such as determining reverse blood flow in the liver vasculature in portal hypertension. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thrombosis is the formation of a blood clot inside a blood vessel, obstructing the flow of blood through the circulatory system. (wikipedia.org)