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  • right vagus
  • The right vagus then crosses anterior to the right subclavian artery, runs posterior to the superior vena cava, descends posterior to the right main bronchus, and contributes to cardiac, pulmonary, and esophageal plexuses. (wikipedia.org)
  • inferior
  • The vagus also controls a few skeletal muscles, including: Cricothyroid muscle Levator veli palatini muscle Salpingopharyngeus muscle Palatoglossus muscle Palatopharyngeus muscle Superior, middle and inferior pharyngeal constrictors Muscles of the larynx (speech). (wikipedia.org)
  • pharynx
  • Exercises for vagus nerve disorders normally involve the pharynx, the area of the throat between the mouth and the larynx. (wisegeek.com)
  • The pharyngeal branch of the vagus nerve, the principal motor nerve of the pharynx, arises from the upper part of the ganglion nodosum, and consists principally of filaments from the cranial portion of the accessory nerve. (wikipedia.org)
  • From the plexus, branches are distributed to the muscles and mucous membrane of the pharynx (except the stylopharyngeus, which is innervated by the glossopharyngeal nerve (CN IX)) and the muscles of the soft palate, except the Tensor veli palatini, which is supplied by the nerve to tensor veli palatini, a branch of the nerve to medial pterygoid (which itself is a branch of the mandibular nerve - CNV/3). (wikipedia.org)
  • The pharyngeal plexus is a network of nerve fibers innervating most of the palate and pharynx. (wikipedia.org)
  • larynx
  • The vagus is responsible for quite a few muscle movements in the mouth and also is vitally important for speech and in keeping the larynx open for breathing. (everything2.com)
  • The vagus nerve serves many organs and structures, including the larynx (voice box), lungs , heart and gastrointestinal tract. (medicinenet.com)
  • Note that the intrinsic muscles of the larynx are innervated by the vagus nerve but not by the pharyngeal plexus. (wikipedia.org)
  • fibers
  • Immunohistochemical data show that SP-fibers account for about 10% of the axons in the cat vagus nerve. (springer.com)
  • Their central fibers synapse in the Trigeminal nerve nuclei. (wikipedia.org)
  • Additional cell bodies are found in the nucleus ambiguus, which give rise to the branchial efferent motor fibers of the vagus nerve (CN X) terminating in the laryngeal, pharyngeal muscles, and musculus uvulae. (wikipedia.org)
  • gastroparesis
  • Vagus nerve disorders also include gastroparesis , a disorder in which the stomach does not have sufficient muscle contractions to move food along the intestines properly. (wisegeek.com)
  • Gastroparesis may occur when the vagus nerve is damaged and the muscles of the stomach and intestines do not properly function. (wikipedia.org)
  • In fact, diabetes mellitus has been named as the most common cause of gastroparesis, as high levels of blood glucose may effect chemical changes in the nerves. (wikipedia.org)
  • The vagus nerve becomes damaged by years of high blood glucose or insufficient transport of glucose into cells resulting in gastroparesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • seizures
  • It is not fully understood how VNS works, but the theory is that the VNS over time modulates nerve pathways involved in seizures. (rch.org.au)
  • It is thought that by stimulating the vagus nerve, electrical energy is discharged upward into a wide area of the brain, disrupting the abnormal brain activity responsible for seizures. (medicinenet.com)
  • organs
  • the visceral organs are all target s for the major stress hormones, and it is thought that a lack of feedback signal from these organ s via the vagus nerve might be responsible for some of the physiological and hormonal changes typical to depression. (everything2.com)
  • He is a pioneer who "got a lot of people onboard and doing research in this area", says Dianne Lorton, a neuroscientist at Kent State University in Ohio, who has spent 30 years studying nerves that infiltrate immune organs such as the lymph nodes and spleen. (scientificamerican.com)
  • neural
  • For example, without the vagus nerve, your body wouldn't be able to measure its own blood pressure (there are pressure-sensitive neural mechanisms in the heart) and wouldn't be able to tell how full or empty the various parts of the GI tract are. (everything2.com)
  • Neuromodulation, whether electrical or magnetic, employs the body's natural biological response by stimulating nerve cell activity that can influence populations of nerves by releasing transmitters, such as dopamine, or other chemical messengers such as the peptide Substance P, that can modulate the excitability and firing patterns of neural circuits. (wikipedia.org)
  • branch
  • The surgeon then wraps the leads around the left branch of the vagus nerve, and connects the electrodes to the generator. (wikipedia.org)
  • Traversing the substance of the temporal bone, it crosses the facial canal about 4 mm (0.16 in) above the stylomastoid foramen, and here it gives off an ascending branch which joins the facial nerve. (wikipedia.org)
  • digestive
  • Patients with vagus nerve disorders may have a variety of symptoms, including low blood pressure , irregular heart rhythms, difficulty in swallowing and digestive problems. (wisegeek.com)
  • Benzodiazepines destroy the vagus nerve, brain, spinal cord and digestive system. (wisegeek.com)
  • brain stem
  • Inflation of a balloon in the bile duct causes, through the vagus nerve, activation of the brain stem and the insular cortex, prefrontal cortex, and somatosensory cortex. (wikipedia.org)
  • branches
  • Highly selective vagotomy refers to denervation of only those branches supplying the lower esophagus and stomach (leaving the nerve of Latarjet in place to ensure the emptying function of the stomach remains intact). (wikipedia.org)
  • activity
  • Simultaneous recordings of microneurographically-recorded muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and continuous and noninvasive blood pressure measurement has disclosed what is going on during the course of syncope progression. (frontiersin.org)
  • Orthostatic syncope is caused by response failure or a lack of sympathetic nerve activity to the orthostatic challenge, followed by fluid shift and subsequent low cerebral perfusion. (frontiersin.org)
  • effects
  • 2000a) and that interference with the effects of the vagus nerve leads to effects on the knee joint arthritis as seen experimentally (van Maanen et al. (diva-portal.org)
  • The vagus nerve is thought to be one key mediator of these effects, as lesions lead to chronic elevations in insulin secretion, promoting energy storage in adipocytes. (wikipedia.org)