• immune responses
  • The federal government has a small stockpile of a traditional egg-based vaccine for H5N1, which has generated modest immune responses in trials. (umn.edu)
  • The high rates of immune responses at all dose levels in this initial human Ebola vaccine study support continued development of this vaccine and further evaluation of our technology for potential additional biodefense and emerging disease applications," said David C. Kaslow, M.D., Vical's Chief Scientific Officer, "particularly where antibody responses may be protective. (rxpgnews.com)
  • It comprises a DNA sequence obtained from bacteria to shut down the T-helper (Th2) cells that trigger the body's inflammatory immune responses. (bio-medicine.org)
  • In all three species, the vaccine induced robust immune responses capable of preventing the virus from infecting cells. (cnbc.com)
  • Inovio's antigen-targeting DNA immunotherapies are designed to activate robust, durable and functional immune responses against cancers or infectious diseases. (cnbc.com)
  • Our animal tests demonstrate that DNA vaccines made with synDNA(TM) technology are not only effective in eliciting robust immune responses, but also provide protection against dangerous pathogens. (bio-medicine.org)
  • influenza
  • Flu vaccines, according to the best scientific evidence available today, will only work against 10% of the circulating viruses that cause the symptoms of seasonal epidemic influenza. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Jan 4, 2007 (CIDRAP News) - Federal officials have announced the launch of the first clinical trial of an H5N1 avian influenza vaccine made from a piece of the virus's DNA rather than from the whole virus, an approach that may facilitate faster vaccine production. (umn.edu)
  • We need to determine whether the DNA vaccine can work and can generate a sufficient amount of the right type of immunity to protect against influenza infections. (umn.edu)
  • Development of this vaccine technology has the potential to improve our production capacity for vaccines to prevent seasonal influenza and other diseases," NIAID Director Anthony S. Fauci, MD, commented in the news release. (umn.edu)
  • Inovio has reported on the preventive power of its synthetic DNA-based vaccines in a variety of infectious diseases including HIV, influenza, hepatitis B, Ebola and dengue. (cnbc.com)
  • The experimental vaccine described in the new research demonstrated complete protection from influenza in mice, but Wei Kong, the leading author of the new study stresses that the innovative technique could be applied to the rapid manufacture of effective vaccines against virtually any infectious invader at dramatically reduced cost and without risk to either those vaccinated or the wider public. (labspaces.net)
  • The group demonstrated the effectiveness of this delayed-lysis bacteria in vaccine experiments with a variety of pathogens, including influenza and mycobacteria (causative agent of tuberculosis) and an RASV vaccine developed in the Curtiss lab against infant pneumonia is currently in FDA Phase I clinical trials. (labspaces.net)
  • They altered the DNA of cowpox virus by inserting a gene from other viruses (namely Herpes simplex virus, hepatitis B and influenza). (wikipedia.org)
  • Paoletti and his colleague, Dennis Panicali, a virologist, altered the DNA of vaccinia virus by inserting a gene from another virus (namely herpes, hepatitis B or influenza). (wikipedia.org)
  • USA 81:193-197 Panicali, Dennis, Stephen W. Davis, Randall L. Weinberg, Enzo Paoletti (1983) "Construction of Live Vaccines by Using Genetically Engineered Poxviruses: Biological Activity of Recombinant Vaccinia Virus Expressing Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin" Proc. (wikipedia.org)
  • A 'vaccine'/antigen based on the hemagglutinin (HA) stem was the first to induce 'broadly neutralizing' antibodies to both HA-group 1 and HA-group 2 influenza in mice. (wikipedia.org)
  • F16 is the only known antibody that binds (its neutralizing activity is controversial) to all 16 subtypes of the influenza A virus hemagglutinin and might be the lynchpin for a universal influenza vaccine. (wikipedia.org)
  • The subdomain of the hemagglutinin that is targeted by FI6, namely the stalk domain, was actually successfully used earlier as universal influenza virus vaccine by Peter Palese's research group at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ebola
  • The vaccine now being tested is similar to other DNA vaccines in development, including vaccines for HIV, Ebola, SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome), and West Nile virus. (umn.edu)
  • By Porter Novelli, Life Sciences, Vical Incorporated (Nasdaq:VICL) announced today that an Ebola vaccine candidate administered using Vical's proprietary DNA delivery technology was safe and well tolerated, and produced both antibody and T-cell Ebola-specific responses in all healthy volunteers who received the full 3 doses of vaccine. (rxpgnews.com)
  • The Phase 1, randomized, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation study, the first human trial for any Ebola vaccine, was sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), National Institutes of Health (NIH), and conducted at the NIH Clinical Center. (rxpgnews.com)
  • The vaccine used in the Phase 1 trial vaccine included three plasmids (closed loops of DNA), one each encoding the surface glycoprotein (GP) from the Zaire strain of Ebola, GP from the Sudan/Gulu strain, and the internal nucleoprotein (NP) from the Zaire strain. (rxpgnews.com)
  • The company believes that the Animal Rule creates a potentially favorable regulatory pathway for certain DNA-based products such as the Ebola vaccine. (rxpgnews.com)
  • Those funds included an initial procurement of $90 million and long-term procurement of $260 million for Ebola vaccines or treatments. (rxpgnews.com)
  • The Ebola DNA vaccine under development by the NIH may be eligible for this stockpiling program. (rxpgnews.com)
  • When we have outbreaks like Ebola or Zika, there are scientists in research labs working day in and day out to find answers, treatments or vaccines to protect us. (wlox.com)
  • therapeutic
  • The report also contains detailed and in-depth analysis of the segmentation of the DNA vaccines market based on types of DNA vaccines, therapeutic indication, end-users, and geography. (medgadget.com)
  • The report also includes pipeline analysis based on the type of phase, therapeutic indications, and type of diseases for which the vaccines have been designed, such as infectious and vector borne diseases, and various types of cancers. (medgadget.com)
  • The product is a therapeutic vaccine to be administered to dogs with stage II or stage III oral melanoma to aid in extending survival times. (agr.ca)
  • The company has developed a breakthrough synthetic process for large-scale production of biologically active DNA that can be made faster and cleaner than production using traditional fermentation methods and has developed a novel expression vector that enables production of therapeutic DNA inside the cell. (bio-medicine.org)
  • The first therapeutic use of gene transfer as well as the first direct insertion of human DNA into the nuclear genome was performed by French Anderson in a trial starting in September 1990. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most common form uses DNA that encodes a functional, therapeutic gene to replace a mutated gene. (wikipedia.org)
  • gene
  • The experimental vaccine uses a modified version of the hemagglutinin gene from a recent strain of the deadly H5N1 virus, the NIH reported. (umn.edu)
  • They designed and produced a 'Gene Gun', which releases a painless puff-like injection of DNA into the skin, which goes directly into the skin cells. (nebraska.tv)
  • Vical has secured a nonexclusive license from the NIH to proprietary gene sequences used in the vaccine. (rxpgnews.com)
  • Preliminary studies suggest that immunisation of balb/c mice by gene gun with DNA from the extracellular region of Tie-2 resulted in cessation of tumor growth. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Using a gene gun HLA-A2 transgenic mice were immunized with the Tie-2 DNA construct. (aacrjournals.org)
  • This press release contains certain forward-looking statements relating to our business, including our plans to develop electroporation-based drug and gene delivery technologies and DNA vaccines, our expectations regarding our research and development programs and our capital resources. (cnbc.com)
  • Michal Šmahel, Ingrid Poláková, Eva Sobotková, and Eva Vajdová, "Systemic Administration of CpG Oligodeoxynucleotide and Levamisole as Adjuvants for Gene-Gun-Delivered Antitumor DNA Vaccines," Clinical and Developmental Immunology , vol. 2011, Article ID 176759, 7 pages, 2011. (hindawi.com)
  • These are plasmids that usually consist of a strong viral promoter to drive the in vivo transcription and translation of the gene (or complementary DNA) of interest. (wikipedia.org)
  • A gene gun or a biolistic particle delivery system, originally designed for plant transformation, is a device for delivering exogenous DNA (transgenes) to cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • which is a gene used to enable detection or removal of those cells which didn't integrate the construct into their DNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, if the delivered DNA construct contains a gene that confers resistance to an antibiotic or herbicide, then stably transformed cells may be selected by including that antibiotic or herbicide in the tissue culture media. (wikipedia.org)
  • HMGB1 is an intracellular protein that can translocate to the nucleus where it binds DNA and regulates gene expression. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first attempt at modifying human DNA was performed in 1980 by Martin Cline, but the first successful nuclear gene transfer in humans, approved by the National Institutes of Health, was performed in May 1989. (wikipedia.org)
  • plasmids
  • In prokaryotes, nonviral extrachromosomal DNA is primarily found in plasmids whereas in eukaryotes extrachromosomal DNA is primarily found in organelles. (wikipedia.org)
  • Extrachromosomal DNA exists in prokaryotes outside the nucleoid region as circular or linear plasmids. (wikipedia.org)
  • Circular bacterial plasmids are also the basis for the production of DNA vaccines. (wikipedia.org)
  • The linear plasmids of prokarykotes are found either containing a hairpin loop or a covalently bonded protein attached to the telomeric ends of the DNA molecule. (wikipedia.org)
  • The linear plasmids which contain a protein that has been covalently attached to the 5' end of the DNA strands are known as invertrons and can range in size from 9 kb to over 600 kb consisting of inverted terminal repeats. (wikipedia.org)
  • These types of linear plasmids represent the largest class of extrachromosomal DNA as they are not only present in certain bacterial cells, but all linear extrachromosomal DNA molecules found in eukaryotic cells also take on this invertron structure with a protein attached to the 5' end. (wikipedia.org)
  • DNA vaccines, such as VGX-3400X (aimed at multiple H5N1 strains), contain DNA fragments (plasmids). (wikipedia.org)
  • Organism
  • It was also confirmed that the sequences of cytoplasmic DNA was different from nuclear DNA in the same organism, showing that cytoplasmic DNAs are not simply fragments of nuclear DNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • Infectious Diseases
  • The vaccine was designed by researchers at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the NIH. (umn.edu)
  • Dr. J. Joseph Kim, President and CEO, Inovio, said: "Once again, our data demonstrates we can rapidly turn our SynCon ® DNA-based immunotherapy platform to create innovative products with the potential to prevent and treat multiple infectious diseases and cancers. (cnbc.com)
  • To advance this quest, a research team led by Roy Curtiss, director of the Center for Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, and Wei Kong, a research assistant professor, at Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute have taken a dramatic step forward, revealing the design of a universal platform for delivering highly potent DNA vaccines, by employing a cleverly re-engineered bacterium to speed delivery to host cells in the vaccine recipient. (labspaces.net)
  • He has also done done extensive work on vaccine development against infectious diseases such as rabies, hepatitis B and Japanese encephalitis and he and his colleagues were successful in developing a new DNA-based vaccine against rabies. (wikipedia.org)
  • diseases
  • This development will not only make vaccinations less harrowing, but also allow for developing and delivering vaccines for diseases too dangerous for conventional techniques . (slashdot.org)
  • Is there a relationship between the burgeoning epidemic of chronic diseases and the vaccine trials that took place decades ago? (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Vaccines have eliminated naturally occurring smallpox, and nearly eliminated polio, while other diseases, such as typhus, rotavirus, hepatitis A and B and others are well controlled. (wikipedia.org)
  • Conventional vaccines cover a small number of diseases, while other infections kill millions of people every year. (wikipedia.org)
  • While killed vaccines do not have this risk, they cannot generate specific killer T cell responses and may not work at all for some diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • pathogen
  • However, attenuated forms of a pathogen can convert to a dangerous form and may cause disease in immunocompromised vaccine recipients (such as those with AIDS). (wikipedia.org)
  • conventional
  • Conventional flu vaccines use viruses that are grown in chicken eggs and administered in weakened or killed form, the NIH noted. (umn.edu)
  • From start to finish it's probably a couple of months," he said, as compared with about 6 to 8 months for the conventional process of growing the vaccine virus in chicken eggs. (umn.edu)
  • DNA vaccines have potential advantages over conventional vaccines, including the ability to induce a wider range of immune response types. (wikipedia.org)
  • The work earned Rangarajan and his colleagues Patent Cooperation Treaty and Indian patents and the vaccine, reportedly cheaper to produce than conventional cell culture rabies vaccines, is being marketed by Indian Immunologicals Limited, under the brand name, Dinarab. (wikipedia.org)
  • trials
  • If the vaccine performs well in trials and if the H5N1 virus evolves into a pandemic strain within the next couple of years, the vaccine could possibly be of some use in combating it, Nabel said. (umn.edu)
  • He said, "The next step for this vaccine is phase III trials, after which the vaccine c ould receive government approval if all goes well. (bio-medicine.org)
  • DNA Vaccine Trials Against HIV Virus In Sweden Nurture Hope ( Swedish researchers have expressed hope. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Swedish researchers have expressed hope regarding the DNA vaccine trials conducted against the AIDS/HIV virus. (bio-medicine.org)
  • The CSP vaccine presented problems in trials due to its poor immunogenicity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Research
  • Here is a 300+ page research download of National Library of Medicine abstracts showing there are over 200 adverse effects of the vaccines in the CDC schedule, including death. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • It was made in the Vaccine Pilot Plant at the NIAID's Vaccine Research Center (VRC). (umn.edu)
  • The UW research team also developed a way to deliver the DNA. (nebraska.tv)
  • Fuller called it a new direction of vaccine research. (nebraska.tv)
  • The data were presented at the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) 2006 Biodefense Research Meeting in Washington, D.C., by Julie E. Martin, D.O., a trial investigator and research scientist at NIAID's Dale and Betty Bumpers Vaccine Research Center (VRC), which developed the vaccine. (rxpgnews.com)
  • DNA vaccine for ragweed allergies ( A recent research reported that ragweed. (bio-medicine.org)
  • A recent research reported that ragweed or hay fever symptoms could be reduced by 60% with the help of an experimental //DNA-based vaccine developed at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Conclusively, the research will prove to be a useful resource for all debut makers in DNA vaccine industry, and potential investors. (medgadget.com)
  • Research led by Dr. Roger Rosenberg shows the potential of a new DNA vaccine in the fight against Alzheimer's Disease. (utsouthwestern.edu)
  • Anna-Lise Williamson is the Director of University of the Cape Town vaccine Research group GLP. (wikipedia.org)
  • Extrachromosomal DNA is often used in research of replication because it is easy to identify and isolate. (wikipedia.org)
  • polio
  • Live, attenuated vaccines, such as smallpox and polio vaccines, are able to induce killer T-cell (TC or CTL) responses, helper T-cell (TH) responses and antibody immunity. (wikipedia.org)
  • tumor
  • He demonstrated that treatment with immunocytokines, which are antibody-cytokine fusion proteins, is effective in this model and that this approach is synergistic with inhibition of angiogenesis as well as tumor vaccines. (wikipedia.org)
  • Development
  • The technology that we're describing in this paper can be used to develop a vaccine against any virus, any parasite, any fungus, whereas this was never possible before the development of recombinant attenuated bacterial strains like those produced in our lab," Curtiss says. (labspaces.net)
  • The result has been the development and ongoing refinement of so-called RASVs (for recombinant attenuated Salmonella vaccines), capable of provoking an intense, system-wide immune response and conferring effective immunity. (labspaces.net)
  • The development of resistance could cause a significant reduction in efficacy of any potential vaccine thus rendering useless a carefully developed and effective treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Known for his studies in the fields of RNA virus replication and vaccine development, Vrati is an elected fellow of the National Academy of Sciences, India and the Indian Academy of Sciences. (wikipedia.org)
  • Vrati's early researches at THSTI focused on JEV life-cycle like receptor binding and entry mechanisms, molecular mechanisms of virus replication, assembly, egress as well as the clinical development of an oral rotavirus vaccine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Later, he concentrated on the development of DNA vaccines and the details of the work has since been published as an article, DNA vaccines: Getting closer to becoming a reality, in 2013. (wikipedia.org)
  • Naked DNA approaches have also been explored, especially in the context of vaccine development. (wikipedia.org)
  • Her publications mainly consists of her area of expertise addressing HIV vaccine development, HIV virus, and HPV virus. (wikipedia.org)
  • proteins
  • Once inside the body, the DNA instructs human cells to make proteins that act as a vaccine against the virus," the agency said. (umn.edu)
  • The DNA is injected into cells, whose "inner machinery" uses the DNA to synthesize the proteins. (wikipedia.org)
  • After binding, HMGB1 bends DNA, which facilitates the binding of other proteins. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2022
  • This comprehensive report by RNCOS entitled "Global DNA Vaccine Market Outlook 2022" provides an in-depth analysis of the global DNA Vaccines market, presenting readers a profound understanding of the various challenges, drivers, and developments in this industry. (medgadget.com)
  • infection
  • Detractors have raised skeptical concerns regarding the materialization of a DNA vaccine for HIV infection. (bio-medicine.org)
  • The vaccine would protect the U.S. military against what has been deemed a bio-weapons agent, teaching the recipient's immune system to fight off a potentially deadly infection. (wlox.com)
  • In addition to DNA found outside the nucleus in cells, infection of viral genomes also provides an example of extrachromosomal DNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • virulent
  • Aug. 19, 2015 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Inovio Pharmaceuticals (NASDAQ:INO) today announced its DNA vaccine targeting the virulent Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) induced 100% protection from a live virus challenge in a preclinical study. (cnbc.com)
  • Data will also be shown demonstrating the effectiveness of a novel vaccine that protects against a highly virulent form of avian (bird) flu in animal challenge studies. (bio-medicine.org)
  • This strain is known to be the most Virulent, and known to be the principle strain that leads to AIDS.The goal of the investigation is to create affordable and effective HIV-1 C vaccines, that would increase the longevity of memory T cells and develop a more functional use of the CD4+ and CD8+ cell response. (wikipedia.org)
  • efficacy
  • Nabel and his colleagues have previously shown the efficacy of DNA flu vaccines in lab animals, including animals exposed to H5N1 viruses and the H1N1 virus that caused the 1918 pandemic, the NIH said. (umn.edu)
  • The prospective vaccine is being tested on a small group of volunteers to assess the safety and efficacy in the first phase. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Due to low efficacy, WHO does not recommend the use of RTS,S vaccine in babies between 6 and 12 weeks of age. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2000
  • Subjects will receive 2 vaccinations with the Biojector® 2000, and will be followed for 6 months to evaluate the safety of and the immune system's response to the vaccine. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • placebo
  • Qualified normal healthy volunteers will be enrolled in the study to receive the vaccine or placebo vaccine. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Thirty volunteers will receive three vaccine injections over 2 months and will be followed for a year, while 15 will receive placebo injections. (umn.edu)
  • Each cohort included two additional subjects who received placebo instead of active vaccine. (rxpgnews.com)