• genomic
  • The first technology evaluated, Nextera™, uses a transposase to fragment genomic DNA followed by limited-cycle PCR to amplify fragmented DNA while simultaneously adding appropriate barcodes and sequencing primers. (udel.edu)
  • Subsequent DNA sequencing revealed coverage-based biases over regions of low or high genomic GC content, likely due to the limited cycle PCR step. (udel.edu)
  • Many published techniques have used multiple displacement amplification (MDA), employing the phiX29 polymerase, to amplify genomic DNA to microgram quantities before proceeding with library preparation and sequencing. (udel.edu)
  • The sequencing, de novo assembly and annotation of transcriptome datasets generated with next generation sequencing (NGS) has enabled biologists to answer genomic questions in non-model species with unprecedented ease. (biomedcentral.com)
  • data
  • In this study, we address these issues by comparing the performance of a number of short read de novo transcriptome assemblers using Ion Torrent sequence data in Nerita melanotragus . (biomedcentral.com)
  • technology
  • While the Nextera protocol may have skewed the distribution of low and high GC phage in mixed sample communities, the technology was sensitive enough to detect rare members in the mock viral community, and in some cases, complete genomes were successfully reconstructed. (udel.edu)
  • RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) broadly refers to a family of experimental techniques that give researchers the ability to study the transcriptional landscapes of cells and tissues quantitatively by exploiting high throughput sequencing technology. (biomedcentral.com)
  • databases
  • Contrary to the low frequency of chaperonin-encoding viruses in sequence databases, a surprising diversity and abundance of viral chaperonins were discovered within viromes representing a range of marine ecosystems. (udel.edu)
  • single
  • Strikingly, coverage patterns for the single and pooled MDA samples were nearly identical, suggesting amplification biases are reproducible and likely sequence-dependent. (udel.edu)