• urethra
  • Pyelostomy followed by valve ablation - stoma is made in the pelvis of the kidney as a slightly high diversion, after which the valve is ablated and the stoma is closed Primary (transurethral) valve ablation - the valve is removed through the urethra without creation of a stoma The standard treatment is primary (transurethral) ablation of the valves. (wikipedia.org)
  • incontinence
  • The treatment consists of Botox being injected into the bladder resulting in relaxation of the bladder, an increase in its storage capacity and a decrease in urinary incontinence. (healthcanal.com)
  • Urinary incontinence associated with neurologic conditions can be difficult to manage," said George Benson, deputy director, Division of Reproductive and Urologic Products. (healthcanal.com)
  • The duration of the effect of Botox on urinary incontinence in patients with bladder overactivity associated with a neurologic condition is about nine months. (healthcanal.com)
  • The patients had urinary incontinence resulting from spinal cord injury or multiple sclerosis. (healthcanal.com)
  • These symptoms include urinary frequency and urgency, feeling of incomplete voiding, poor voluntary control, and urge and stress incontinence. (wikipedia.org)
  • It may be performed in cases of incontinence or neurological problems affecting the urinary tract. (wikipedia.org)
  • blood vessels
  • Notable causes of prerenal AKI include low blood volume (e.g., dehydration), low blood pressure, heart failure (leading to cardiorenal syndrome), liver cirrhosis and local changes to the blood vessels supplying the kidney. (wikipedia.org)
  • Angiogram tests to look at the blood vessels in the kidney may show abnormal blood flow, perhaps causing a cramp like pain. (wikipedia.org)
  • serum creatinine
  • The acute part of AoCRF may be reversible, and the goal of treatment, as with AKI, is to return the patient to baseline kidney function, typically measured by serum creatinine. (wikipedia.org)
  • A diagnosis is made when there is a rapid reduction in kidney function, as measured by serum creatinine, or based on a rapid reduction in urine output, termed oliguria (less than 400 mLs of urine per 24 hours). (wikipedia.org)
  • causes
  • Renal causes can be attributed to decreased kidney function. (wikipedia.org)
  • The causes of diseases of the body are common to the urinary tract. (wikipedia.org)
  • The causes of adult osteomalacia are varied, but ultimately result in a vitamin D deficiency: Insufficient nutritional quantities or faulty metabolism of vitamin D or phosphorus Renal tubular acidosis Malnutrition during pregnancy Malabsorption syndrome Hypophosphatemia Chronic kidney failure Tumor-induced osteomalacia (Oncogenic osteomalacia) Long-term anticonvulsant therapy Celiac disease Cadmium poisoning, itai-itai disease Biochemical features are similar to those of rickets. (wikipedia.org)
  • Play media Prerenal causes of AKI ("pre-renal azotemia") are those that decrease effective blood flow to the kidney and cause a decrease in the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). (wikipedia.org)
  • lead to kidney failure
  • If not treated promptly, they can eventually lead to kidney failure. (umm.edu)
  • As the condition becomes more serious, signs of septic shock may appear, including: Low blood pressure (hypotension) Low body temperature (hypothermia) Little or no urine output (oliguria) Respiratory distress (dyspnea and labored breathing) Septic shock may lead to kidney failure, bleeding diathesis, and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). (wikipedia.org)
  • liver
  • The asymmetry within the abdominal cavity, caused by the position of the liver, typically results in the right kidney being slightly lower and smaller than the left, and being placed slightly more to the middle than the left kidney. (wikipedia.org)
  • The right kidney sits just below the diaphragm and posterior to the liver. (wikipedia.org)
  • The superior pole of the right kidney is adjacent to the liver. (wikipedia.org)
  • clinical
  • Featuring a superb compilation of chapters related to kidney function that appear in Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, Eighteenth Edition , this concise, full-color clinical companion delivers the latest knowledge in the field backed by the scientific rigor and authority that have defined Harrison's . (iberlibro.com)
  • Clinical symptoms of kidney disease develop when kidney function has deteriorated a significant amount (up to 75%), as a result it can progress for some time without being noticed. (swadlincotevets.co.uk)
  • The Uremic Syndrome can be defined as the terminal clinical manifestation of kidney failure (also called renal failure). (wikipedia.org)
  • Though crystallized urinary solutes, such as oxalates, urates, or sulfonamides, may become enmeshed within a ketanaline cast during its formation, the clinical significance of this occurrence is not felt to be great. (wikipedia.org)
  • The clinical picture is often dominated by the underlying cause.The symptoms of acute kidney injury result from the various disturbances of kidney function that are associated with the disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acute kidney injury is diagnosed on the basis of clinical history and laboratory data. (wikipedia.org)
  • urea
  • Both uremia and the uremic syndrome have been used interchangeably to denote a very high plasma urea concentration that is the result of renal failure. (wikipedia.org)