• facial
  • More severe cases impacting the jaw as in Class Two and Three, may require orthodontic appliances or surgery to correct bite and as part of facial reconstruction. (kissdental.co.uk)
  • The new hominid has been given the scientific name of Anoiapithecus brevirostris, in reference to the region where the town of els Hostalets is situated (l'Anoia) and also to the fact that the new taxon has a very modern facial morphology, characterized by a very reduced facial prognathism , i. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • an abnormal facial configuration in which one or both jaws project forward. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • n a facial disharmony in which one or both jaws project forward. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Using your comprehensive facial x-rays, along with computer video imaging, your surgeon can show you exactly how your jaw will be repositioned and how your bite and appearance will be improved. (pacificoralsurgeon.com)
  • General patterns of dental morphological evolution throughout human evolution include a reduction in facial prognathism, the presence of a Y5 cusp pattern, the formation of a parabolic palate and the loss of the diastema. (wikipedia.org)
  • Major characterizing features of Pan troglodyte dental morphology include the presence of peripherally located cusps, thin enamel, and strong facial prognathism. (wikipedia.org)
  • He demonstrates progressive coarsening of his facial features with a large bulbous nose, broad forehead, protuberant lips and forward-jutting jaw (prognathism). (wikipedia.org)
  • abnormalities
  • Additional dermatologic abnormalities (axillary freckling, localized hypopigmentation, interdigital webbing, hyperelastic skin) Mild mental retardation is observed in about 30% of those affected with the syndrome Nystagmus (involuntary eye movements), seizures, or hyposmia (reduced ability to smell) has been documented in a few patients In 2004, a patient was reported with recurrent upper extremity aneurysms that required surgical repairs. (wikipedia.org)
  • temporomandibular
  • Orthognathic surgery can be used to correct: Gross jaw discrepancies (anteroposterior, vertical, or transverse discrepancies) Skeletofacial discrepancies associated with documented sleep apnea, airway defects, and soft tissue discrepancies Skeletofacial discrepancies associated with documented temporomandibular joint pathology A disproportionately grown upper or lower jaw causes dentofacial deformities. (wikipedia.org)
  • orthognathic surgery
  • Orthognathic surgery is utilized to resolve jaw problems that are unable to be corrected with orthodontics alone, although orthodontics is typically an integral part of the jaw alignment process. (pacificoralsurgeon.com)
  • Because the jaw position continues to change as children grow, it is recommended that orthognathic surgery be performed after growth stops, typically 16-18 years of age for males and 13-15 years for females. (pacificoralsurgeon.com)
  • The goal of orthognathic surgery is to move the jaw bone into the correct position and balance the skeleton. (pacificoralsurgeon.com)
  • In severe malocclusions that can be a part of craniofacial abnormality, management often requires a combination of orthodontics with headgear or reverse pull facemask and / or jaw surgery or orthognathic surgery. (wikipedia.org)
  • anterior
  • Due to the parallels of the muzzle sides and to the fullness and the width of the whole jaw, the anterior face of the muzzle is flat and square. (canecorso.ru)
  • The vertebrate jaw is derived from the most anterior two pharyngeal arches supporting the gills, and usually bears numerous teeth. (wikipedia.org)
  • The two most anterior pharyngeal arches are thought to have become the jaw itself and the hyoid arch, respectively. (wikipedia.org)
  • In instances of extreme deformity, where an adult's lower jaw is hopelessly inadequate ( Class II ) t o correct with orthodontics alone, or in many cases of lower jaw prognathism ( Class III ), and frequently in cases of anterior open bite (where only the upper and lower back teeth make contact), it becomes necessary to combine the orthodontist's skills with that of an oral surgeon to affect a cure. (doctorspiller.com)
  • molars
  • Behind the interdental space, all horses also have twelve premolars and twelve molars, also known as cheek teeth or jaw teeth. (wikipedia.org)
  • In some cases, sharp edges can occur on the outside of the upper molars and the inside of the lower molars, as they are unopposed by an opposite grinding surface. (wikipedia.org)
  • This breaks down to four incisors, two canines, four premolars, and six molars on the upper and lower sets of teeth. (wikipedia.org)
  • The upper molars have three roots while the lower molars have two roots. (wikipedia.org)
  • Problem with parrot mouth occur if the molars at the back of the mouth are also uneven, resulting in large hooks forming on the upper molars and the rear of the lower back molars. (wikipedia.org)
  • chin
  • the chin and lower lip protrude prominently, and the upper lip seems to regress. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The branches of the lower jaw are very strong and, seen from the side, are quite curved, the body of the lower jaw, well accentuated forward, points out well the marked chin. (canecorso.ru)
  • The evolution of the jaw is thought to have facilitated encephalization, speech, and the formation of the chin, a uniquely human feature. (wikipedia.org)
  • prominence
  • 3,4) Carious and misplaced teeth, (4) and patchy sclerosis of the cranial vault with associated moderate supraorbital prominence and prognathism are features that have been reported in Pyletype metaphyseal dysplasia. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • humans
  • The configuration of the neck relative to the skull base, the shape of the palate, and prognathism and mouth size can be scaled against those of chimpanzees and/or humans to judge whether the physical speech apparatus in a given taxon resembled those of apes or that of humans. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Prognathism in humans can be due to normal variation among phenotypes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Over evolutionary time the more familiar use of jaws (to humans), in feeding, was selected for and became a very important function in vertebrates. (wikipedia.org)
  • tumors
  • Other contributing causes are injuries to the jaw, tumors, lost teeth, overcrowding of teeth, incorrect fitting orthodontic treatments or appliances, or prolonged habits during childhood, such as bottle and thumb sucking or tongue thrusting. (kissdental.co.uk)
  • Abnormal
  • Other features and findings include: intrauterine growth retardation, congenital hip dislocations, winged scapulae (shoulder blades), pes planus (fallen arches), pseudoepiphyses of the second metacarpals (upper bone of the fingers), hypotelorism (close-set eyes), malformed ears, developmental delay, failure to thrive and abnormal electroencephalograph (EEG) readings. (wikipedia.org)
  • There may be a difference between the size of the upper and lower jaws or between jaw and tooth size, resulting in overcrowding of teeth or in abnormal bite patterns. (downtownbrooklyn-dental.com)
  • tooth
  • Each unit of the jaw holds a single, perpetually growing tooth composed of crystalline calcium carbonate. (wikipedia.org)
  • The size of the upper canine tooth in A. ramidus males was not distinctly different from that of females. (wikipedia.org)
  • palate
  • Some common genetic defects are entropion (inverted eyelids), cleft palate, parrot mouth (undershot jaw, cryptorchidism (one or both testicles retained in the abdomen), hernias, abdominal impaction, and spider lambs, and even prolapses. (purdue.edu)
  • Severely
  • Prognathism is considered a disorder only if it affects mastication, speech or social function as a byproduct of severely affected aesthetics of the face. (wikipedia.org)
  • orthodontics
  • Orthodontia, also called orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics, is a specialty field of dentistry that deals primarily with malpositioned teeth and the jaws: their diagnosis, prevention and correction. (wikipedia.org)
  • bone
  • In the ape there is a reinforcement to the lower jaw bone called the simian shelf. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the evolution of the mammalian jaw, two of the bones of the jaw structure (the articular bone of the lower jaw, and quadrate) were reduced in size and incorporated into the ear, while many others have been fused together. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chewing becomes problematic, and may also cause pain due to straining of the jaw muscle and bone. (wikipedia.org)
  • buccal
  • The jaws were used in the buccal pump (observable in modern fish and amphibians) that pumps water across the gills of fish or air into the lungs in the case of amphibians. (wikipedia.org)
  • cheek
  • These sharp edges can reduce chewing efficiency of the teeth, interfere with jaw motion, and in extreme cases can cut the tongue or cheek, making eating and riding painful. (wikipedia.org)
  • differs
  • Although relations between the two are clearly cordial, the physiognomy of the Orangeman's face clearly differs from the prognathism used by Staples to depict those of the Catholic and his family. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The upper canines contain a mesial groove which differs from both Australopithecus and Ardipithecus. (wikipedia.org)
  • airway
  • This can happen due to habits such as digit sucking, prolonged use of pacifier or upper airway obstruction. (wikipedia.org)