• tissues
  • The tumors don't tend to grow into the deeper layers of the stomach or spread to other organs or tissues, and are often treated by removing them completely through an endoscope. (cancer.org)
  • Depending on the size of the tumor and whether it is growing into nearby tissues, other options include surgery to remove the tumor (local excision), removing all or part of the duodenum with nearby lymph nodes, and removing the duodenum and part of the pancreas (a pancreatoduodenectomy). (cancer.org)
  • Tumors larger than 2 cm are more likely to have already spread to nearby tissues and lymph nodes, so more extensive surgery is usually recommended for these tumors. (cancer.org)
  • either
  • These tumors need to be removed, either through an endoscope or in a regular operation through an incision in the abdomen that removes the tumor and some surrounding stomach tissue. (cancer.org)
  • often
  • It is known that these tumors occur more often in some families and are then passed from one generation to the next by inherited genes. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Like type 1 tumors they are often small and there may be more than one at a time. (cancer.org)
  • Most often, an appendectomy (surgical removal of the appendix) is the only treatment needed for carcinoid tumors that are 2 cm (a little less than an inch) across or smaller. (cancer.org)