• high-altitude
  • The limited supply of captured German V-2 rockets led to the U.S. use of high-altitude balloon launches carrying fruit flies, mice, hamsters, guinea pigs, cats, dogs, frogs, goldfish and monkeys to heights of up to 144,000 feet (44,000 m). (wikipedia.org)
  • These high-altitude balloon flights from 1947 to 1960 tested radiation exposure, physiological response, life support and recovery systems. (wikipedia.org)
  • The U.S. high-altitude manned balloon flights occurred in the same time frame, one of which also carried fruit flies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dunlop, the recognized worldwide brand leader in squash, announced the first-ever high altitude hardball squash doubles ball Wednesday, March 22. (ussquash.com)
  • With the recent 2017 National Doubles tournament being held in Denver, Colorado, US Squash turned to Dunlop, its longtime partner, to deliver the first-ever ball designed specifically for the high altitude. (ussquash.com)
  • Thanks to Dunlop's continued support of squash in the United States, we now have a true high-altitude hardball doubles ball. (ussquash.com)
  • Finally, players in high-altitude cities in three countries including Mexico City, Calgary, Edmonton, Denver, Vail, Colorado Springs and Santa Fe can enjoy the same great hardball doubles experience as players at sea-level. (ussquash.com)
  • The relationship with US Squash is very important to Dunlop, so we were more than happy to produce the high altitude ball to help with the recent National Doubles Tournament in Denver," said Kai Nitsche, V.P. Dunlop Sports Group Americas. (ussquash.com)
  • People who go on true high altitude trips make take emergency gear like Gamow bags, but I seriously doubt that makes them think, 'great, now I can risk near-fatal medical crises. (summitpost.org)
  • aircraft's
  • The static ports are vital to the operation of virtually all of those flight instruments that provide basic aerodynamic data such as airspeed, altitude and vertical speed, not only to the pilots but also to the aircraft's computers, which provide additional functions such as warnings when flight characteristics approach dangerous levels. (wikipedia.org)
  • barometric
  • The change in barometric pressure indicative of an approaching storm system is VERY minor compared with the altitude changes a typical mountain hiker would experience. (backpackinglight.com)
  • All marine units operate at a fairly constant geopotential altitude (0 feet Mean Sea Level plus or minus waves, tidal surge, etc, in the oceans) therefore all barometric changes they sense are due to weather change, and such an alarm would have more validity. (backpackinglight.com)
  • I understand the altitude/barometric issue now and will 'recalibrate' my expectations to only consider it for overnite stationary utility in camp. (backpackinglight.com)
  • Sun's
  • At noon the sun's change of altitude is very slow, so determining the exact time that the sun is at its zenith by direct observation is impossible, and therefore it is impossible to obtain an accurate longitude at the moment of Zenith. (wikipedia.org)
  • aircraft
  • see QNH) Absolute altitude is the height of the aircraft above the terrain over which it is flying. (wikipedia.org)
  • Secondary surveillance radar (SSR) is a radar system used in air traffic control (ATC), that not only detects and measures the position of aircraft i.e. bearing, but also requests additional information from the aircraft itself such as its identity and altitude. (wikipedia.org)
  • Today's SSR can provide much more detailed information, for example, the aircraft altitude, as well as enabling the direct exchange of data between aircraft for collision avoidance. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most SSR systems rely on Mode C transponders, which report the aircraft pressure altitude. (wikipedia.org)
  • The aircraft will need to achieve a higher true airspeed to attain the same lift - this implies both a longer takeoff roll and a higher true airspeed which must be maintained when airborne to avoid stalling. (wikipedia.org)
  • Landing of the aircraft in the attitude indicated, under the then-existing conditions of water surface and weather, was due to Cramer's having misjudged his true altitude and his failure to correct his attitude for a normal landing. (wikipedia.org)
  • noon
  • The navigator measures the altitude of the sun as close to noon as possible and then calculates where the position line lies. (wikipedia.org)
  • The tables are a quick and easy way to correct the altitude when the object is fairly low in the sky and the observer has only missed noon by a few minutes but if noon has been missed by more than that or the sun is high in the sky it is better to work out a sight by the intercept method. (wikipedia.org)
  • 29.92
  • this is referred to over the radio as height, where the specified datum is the airfield elevation (see QFE) Pressure altitude is the elevation above a standard datum air-pressure plane (typically, 1013.25 millibars or 29.92" Hg). (wikipedia.org)
  • radius
  • Center = geographical position of the body: (B, L) = (Dec, GHA) Radius = zenith distance: zd [nm] = 60 ⋅ (90 - Ho) The equation links the following variables The position of the observer: B, L. The coordinates of the observed star, its geographical position: GHA, Dec. The true altitude of the body: Ho. (wikipedia.org)
  • Class B airspace normally begins at the surface in the immediate area of the airport, and successive shelves of greater and greater radius begin at higher and higher altitudes at greater distances from the airport. (wikipedia.org)
  • Radius of the altitude hole in pixels and in nautical miles. (minotb52ufo.com)
  • feet
  • Pressure altitude is used to indicate "flight level" which is the standard for altitude reporting in the U.S. in Class A airspace (above roughly 18,000 feet). (wikipedia.org)
  • Remember the rule of thumb that 1mb of mercury is equivalent to an altitude change of 27 feet (true at sea level). (backpackinglight.com)
  • It was later believed that the following factors might have contributed to the crash:[citation needed] Lights from the houses in the Ohio River valley, located 400 feet (120 m) below the altitude of the airport, may have conveyed an illusion of runway lights. (wikipedia.org)
  • The typical altitude of the basins are around 4 5000 feet with the passes over the ridges rising to 6-7000 feet. (ibmwr.org)
  • Terrain displays, at least in Garmin systems, use GPS altitude, which is more or less absolute altitude ±100 feet (depending on the receiver's current accuracy). (blogspot.com)
  • higher
  • Parachutes at higher altitudes fly more aggressively, making their effective area lower, which is more demanding for the pilot's skill and can be especially dangerous for high-performance landings, which require accurate estimates and have a low margin of error before they become dangerous. (wikipedia.org)
  • The sun is brighter at the higher altitude. (ibmwr.org)
  • Choose a higher altitude than you think you need, because in fact you need it. (blogspot.com)
  • zenith distance
  • This is referred to as the True Zenith Distance. (wikipedia.org)
  • The true zenith distance of the object is also the distance (in arc) on the Earth's surface from the observer to where that object is overhead, the geographical position of the object. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1994
  • Wilmore and Costill (1994) specifically questioned the wisdom of altitude training for swimmers. (sdsu.edu)
  • measurement
  • As a general definition, altitude is a distance measurement, usually in the vertical or "up" direction, between a reference datum and a point or object. (wikipedia.org)
  • definitive
  • Although the field contains many studies, those which are definitive lead to the conclusion that altitude training is not an avenue for enhancing the sea-level performances of highly-trained swimmers. (sdsu.edu)
  • correct
  • Because a maintenance worker had failed to remove tape covering the static ports, the air data computers were unable to report the correct airspeed and altitude. (wikipedia.org)
  • Its correct altitude should have been just below 1,000 ft (300 m) at that time. (wikipedia.org)
  • plus
  • The sane way to proceed would have been to define a new sentence containing all the GPRMC information, plus altitude, plus a real four-digit year, even if error bars had to remain suppressed for some inexplicable reason. (ibiblio.org)
  • increase
  • For running events, it has even been proposed that since the increase in popularity of altitude training the rate of progress of world-records and best times has slowed (Peronnet, 1995). (sdsu.edu)
  • given
  • It is defined as the locus of the Earth on which an observer sees a star, at a given time, with the same observed altitude. (wikipedia.org)
  • mean
  • Aviation altitude is measured using either mean sea level (MSL) or local ground level (above ground level, or AGL) as the reference datum. (wikipedia.org)
  • level
  • The true altitudes of the locality vary from 146 m (floodlands of the Yauza River) to 175 m above sea level. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is argued that altitude training does not facilitate improved performances at sea-level because of the specificity of the acclimatization response. (sdsu.edu)
  • This article analyzes the proposal that altitude training benefits sea-level performances in trained elite swimmers. (sdsu.edu)
  • The status of opinions about the effectiveness of altitude training on sea-level performances of highly-trained athletes is one of division. (sdsu.edu)
  • Further considerations of altitude training for prospective Olympic level athletes were entertained by the US Swimming Steering Committee. (sdsu.edu)
  • Although physiological and performance changes normally occur in concert with exercise stimulation, it does not necessarily follow that physiological changes from a non-exercise stimulus (i.e., altitude) will promote exercise performance changes in an unrelated environment (i.e., sea-level) (Wolski, McKenzie, & Wenger, 1996). (sdsu.edu)
  • aviation
  • In aviation, the term altitude can have several meanings, and is always qualified by explicitly adding a modifier (e.g. "true altitude"), or implicitly through the context of the communication. (wikipedia.org)
  • below
  • When it made its last turn to the southeast to line up with the runway, it flew into the wooded slopes of the valley 3 km north of the runway threshold in poor visibility, at an altitude of 225' below the runway's elevation. (wikipedia.org)
  • report
  • Scientific investigations report two classes of response to altitude: (a) physiological mechanisms (e.g. (sdsu.edu)
  • performance
  • It is argued that if complete altitude acclimatization was to occur, it would not be possible to train with sufficient volume or intensity to maintain high levels of performance. (sdsu.edu)
  • The practice of conducting altitude training camps for elite swimmers is not justified on either physiological grounds or performance benefits. (sdsu.edu)