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  • skull fractures
  • Damage to adjacent structures such as nerves, muscles or blood vessels, spinal cord, and nerve roots (for spine fractures), or cranial contents (for skull fractures) may cause other specific signs and symptoms. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are four major types of skull fractures: Linear Depressed Diastatic Basilar Linear fractures are the most common, and usually require no intervention for the fracture itself. (wikipedia.org)
  • Skull fractures occur more easily at the thin squamous temporal and parietal bones, the sphenoid sinus, the foramen magnum (the opening at the base of the skull that the spinal cord passes through), the petrous temporal ridge, and the inner portions of the sphenoid wings at the base of the skull. (wikipedia.org)
  • This area of the cranial floor is weakened further by the presence of multiple foramina as a result this section is at higher risk for basilar skull fractures to occur. (wikipedia.org)
  • Linear skull fractures are breaks in the bone that transverse the full thickness of the skull from the outer to inner table. (wikipedia.org)
  • Linear skull fractures are usually of little clinical significance unless they parallel in close proximity or transverse a suture, or they involve a venous sinus groove or vascular channel. (wikipedia.org)
  • Depressed skull fractures present a high risk of increased pressure on the brain, or a hemorrhage to the brain that crushes the delicate tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • fibula
  • The effect of intact fibula on pilon fracture is not completely elucidated. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • We retrospectively analysed pilon fractures with intact fibula at our hospital over a 4 year period to understand the injury mechanism, fracture characteristics, treatment strategy and prognosis of this fracture. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Pilon fracture patients with intact fibula treated in our hospital from January 2010 to December 2014 were observed. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • injury
  • Young people experience these fractures often as a result of a high-energy injury, such as a fall from considerable height, sports-related trauma, and motor vehicle accidents. (aaos.org)
  • Older persons with poorer quality bone often require only low-energy injury (fall from a standing position) to create these fractures. (aaos.org)
  • direct fracture one at the site of injury. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • indirect fracture one distant from the site of injury. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Introduction Although ipsilateral femoral shaft and neck fractures are difficult to treat, there is still no consensus on the optimal treatment of this complex injury. (ebscohost.com)
  • However, olecranon fractures are a common injury in adults. (wikipedia.org)
  • While an uncomplicated skull fracture can occur without associated physical or neurological damage and is in itself usually not clinically significant, a fracture in healthy bone indicates that a substantial amount of force has been applied and increases the possibility of associated injury. (wikipedia.org)
  • There is an association of ZMC fractures with naso-orbito-ethmoidal fractures (NOE) on the same side as the injury. (wikipedia.org)
  • Neurovascular
  • The neurovascular bundle of the arm may be affected in severe cases, which will cause loss of nerve function and diminished blood supply beneath the fracture. (wikipedia.org)
  • callus
  • Surgery in this case would be to avoid skin breakdown over pronounced callus formation about the fracture site. (medscape.com)
  • Immobilization should continue until repeat radiographs show callus formation and healing across the fracture site. (medscape.com)
  • Will the implant function to share weight bearing loads with the bone column following treatment or will the implant function to carry all the weight bearing loads until a fracture gap is bridged with callus (biobuttress). (vin.com)
  • surgical
  • Eleven consecutive patients with dehiscence of the surgical wound in outcomes MIPO using a Locking Compression Plate (LCP) for tibial pilon, or calcaneus fractures. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Depressed fractures are usually comminuted, with broken portions of bone displaced inward-and may require surgical intervention to repair underlying tissue damage. (wikipedia.org)
  • occur
  • Fractures that involve the tibial plateau occur when a force drives the lower end of the thighbone (femur) into the soft bone of the tibial plateau, similar to a die punch. (aaos.org)
  • A fracture of the upper tibia can occur from stress (minor breaks from unusual excessive activity) or from already compromised bone (as in cancer or infection). (aaos.org)
  • Distal fractures occur most frequently in children who attempt to break a fall with an outstretched hand. (wikipedia.org)
  • Less frequently, proximal fractures occur from motor vehicle accidents, gunshots, and violent muscle contractions from an electric shock or seizure. (wikipedia.org)
  • A stress fracture of the proximal and shaft regions can occur after an excessive amount of throwing, such as pitching in baseball. (wikipedia.org)
  • Smith's
  • The fracture is most commonly caused by people falling onto a hard surface and breaking their fall with outstretched hand (FOOSH)-falling with wrists flexed would lead to a Smith's fracture. (wikipedia.org)
  • tibial
  • Types of tibia fractures that enter the joint and affect the tibial plateau. (aaos.org)
  • Reproduced and modified with permission from Perry CR: Fractures of the tibial plateau. (aaos.org)
  • The aim is to present a case series that illustrates possible benefits from combining minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO), plastic surgery and antibiotic therapy, in order to treat and eradicate infection in patients with tibial pilon or calcaneal fractures. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • cranial
  • A skull fracture is a break in one or more of the eight bones that form the cranial portion of the skull, usually occurring as a result of blunt force trauma. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other areas more susceptible to fractures are the cribriform plate, the roof of orbits in the anterior cranial fossa, and the areas between the mastoid and dural sinuses in the posterior cranial fossa. (wikipedia.org)
  • suture
  • The formerly used 'tripod fracture' refers to these buttresses, but did not also incorporate the posterior relationship of the zygoma to the sphenoid bone at the zygomaticosphenoid suture. (wikipedia.org)
  • The zygomatic arch usually fractures at its weakest point, 1.5 cm behind the zygomaticotemporal suture. (wikipedia.org)