• physics
  • Equation of State Calculations by Fast Computing Machines is an article published by Nicholas Metropolis, Arianna W. Rosenbluth, Marshall N. Rosenbluth, Augusta H. Teller, and Edward Teller in the Journal of Chemical Physics in 1953. (wikipedia.org)
  • Today's computers---both in theory (Turing machines) and practice (PCs and smart phones)---are based on classical physics. (cwi.nl)
  • The quadratic speedup is not as dramatic as the speedup for factoring, discrete logs, or physics simulations. (wikipedia.org)
  • This observation made him one of the first scholars in ancient physics to address the role of time in the universe, a key and sometimes contentious concept in modern and present-day physics. (wikipedia.org)
  • publishes
  • A similar example is given in the television series Doctor Who of a time-traveler who copies Beethoven's music from the future and publishes it in Beethoven's time in Beethoven's name. (wikipedia.org)
  • researchers
  • Last spring, the researchers announced that their instrument could perform as a three-in-one detection machine, monitoring the air for biological, chemical and explosive agents. (nanowerk.com)
  • At the same time some of the LNF researchers took part in important foreign experiments: at CERN, in US laboratories (Fermilab, SLAC, Jefferson Lab), in Hamburg and recently even in Beijing and Japan. (wikipedia.org)
  • Star Trek
  • We examined the plausibility of this and looked at why sating all our desires leads to a glorious utopia in Star Trek , but a ruined dystopia in The Time Machine . (blogspot.com)
  • The Time Traveller soon discovers that this false Eden really does have more in common with Star Trek' s Risa - an artificial pleasure planet - than he first suspected. (blogspot.com)
  • A transporter is a fictional teleportation machine used in the Star Trek universe. (wikipedia.org)
  • In August 2008, physicist Michio Kaku predicted in Discovery Channel Magazine that a teleportation device similar to those in Star Trek would be invented within 100 years. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Star Trek: The Next Generation Technical Manual claims that the devices transport objects in real time, accurate to the quantum level. (wikipedia.org)
  • The term predestination paradox is used in the Star Trek franchise to mean "a time loop in which a time traveler who has gone into the past causes an event that ultimately causes the original future version of the person to go back into the past. (wikipedia.org)
  • This use of the phrase was created for a sequence in a 1996 episode of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine titled "Trials and Tribble-ations", although the phrase had been used previously to refer to belief systems such as Calvinism and some forms of Marxism which encouraged followers to strive to produce certain outcomes while at the same time teaching that the outcomes were predetermined. (wikipedia.org)
  • problem
  • Or, it could be that the D-Wave's qubits are not ideal - the device uses qubit technology that is a decade old, so the bits may only stay in position for about 10 nanoseconds (10 billionths of a second), even though it takes 20 microseconds (2,000 times as long) to solve a problem, Troyer said. (csmonitor.com)
  • This problem is generally believed to take exponential time on even the best classical computers, and its assumed hardness forms the basis of much of modern cryptography (particularly the widespread RSA system). (cwi.nl)
  • Realizing that stellarators were magnetic bottles that were curved and not straight, he convinced Spitzer to allow him to build straight machines to isolate the problem, even though these would have leaks at the ends. (ebooks.com)
  • It solved both the factoring problem and the discrete log problem. (wikipedia.org)
  • He had a problem, and emotions could be deferred until the fitting time. (gutenberg.ca)
  • 2017
  • According to the Wall Street Journal in early 2017, Quantifind's data platform for restaurant chains was responsible for discovering widespread McDonald's customer discord with the its ice cream machines. (wikipedia.org)
  • once
  • each simulation consisted of up to 48 cycles, where each cycle consisted of moving each particle once and took about three minutes of computer time using the MANIAC computer at Los Alamos National Lab. (wikipedia.org)
  • plasma
  • Experiments on these showed that the plasma was lost by turbulence, and these random motions were aligned along the magnetic field, with wavelengths longer than any plasma waves known at that time. (ebooks.com)
  • Science
  • Teaching a machine to sense its environment is one of the most intractable problems of computer science, but one European project is looking to nature for help in cracking the conundrum. (innovations-report.com)
  • Physicists also contributed to the war effort, developing wireless communication technologies and sound-based methods of detecting U-boats, resulting in the first tenuous long-term connections between academic science and the military. (wikipedia.org)
  • The course is taught from a computer science perspective but should be accessible for physicists as well. (cwi.nl)
  • In 1923, faced with differences between older members focusing on inner development and younger members eager to become active in the social transformations of the time, Steiner refounded the Society in an inclusive manner and established a School for Spiritual Science. (wikipedia.org)
  • source
  • The Time Traveller soon discovers the source of the Eloi's clothing : a foul race of pale ape-like creatures known as Morlocks who shun daylight and live underground. (blogspot.com)
  • Professor
  • The objective was to study sensory fusion in biological systems and then translate that knowledge into the creation of intelligent computational machines," says Martin McGinnity, Professor of Intelligent Systems Engineering and Director of the Intelligent Systems Engineering Laboratory (ISEL) at the University of Ulster s Magee Campus and coordinator of the Future and Emerging Technologies(FET) initiative-funded SENSEMAKER project of the IST programme. (innovations-report.com)
  • although
  • By the late 1970s, newer machines had reached all of the conditions needed for practical fusion, although not at the same time and in a single reactor. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Morlocks operate machines, although exactly what the purpose of the machines is is not made clear (beyond providing for the Eloi), and so are clearly more intelligent than the Eloi. (blogspot.com)
  • The term "time loop" is sometimes used to refer to a causal loop, but although they appear similar, causal loops are unchanging and self-originating, whereas time loops are constantly resetting. (wikipedia.org)
  • basic
  • He had details wrong but the basic concept right: a suite of equations that, when applied to measurements of heat, cloudiness, humidity and the like, could project how those factors would change over time. (nytimes.com)
  • original
  • Tokamaks were invented in the 1950s by Soviet physicists Igor Tamm and Andrei Sakharov, inspired by an original idea of Oleg Lavrentiev. (wikipedia.org)
  • human
  • Sermonti is well known for his criticism of natural selection as the deciding factor of human biology. (wikipedia.org)
  • Continue
  • The FACETS project, also funded by FET will continue to explore machine perception, focusing on vision. (innovations-report.com)
  • To meet the information storage and transmission requirements would require current computing capabilities to continue improve by a factor of 10 to 100 times per decade for 200 to 300 years. (wikipedia.org)
  • faster
  • Last week, Dr. Blackmon said in an interview, he met a climatologist from a Swiss university who was preparing to run a copy of the Boulder laboratory's most sophisticated model on a supercomputer in Bern ''six to eight times faster than we can here. (nytimes.com)
  • accurate
  • Negative feedback loops in which just the right amount of correction is applied with optimum timing can be very stable, accurate, and responsive. (wikipedia.org)
  • take
  • Its main building block is the qubit which, unlike classical bits, can take both values 0 and 1 at the same time, and hence affords a certain kind of parallelism. (cwi.nl)
  • long
  • They posed a thousand random optimization problems to the machine, and measured how long it took to solve them, compared with a classical PC. (csmonitor.com)
  • spent
  • They spent all their time in playing gently, in bathing in the river, in making love in a half-playful fashion, in eating fruit and sleeping. (blogspot.com)
  • However, this would have required unfeasible and unaffordable sets and model filming, as well as episode running time spent while landing, taking off, etc. (wikipedia.org)
  • problems
  • They instead demonstrated a new series of problems that limited their performance and demonstrated that a successful machine would have to be larger and more complex. (wikipedia.org)
  • He does not find this paradoxical, and attributes problems regarding the validity of time travel to other factors in the interpretation of general relativity. (wikipedia.org)
  • natural
  • Quarry Bank Mill, an 18th-century working (at this time) cotton mill in north west England, is donated to the National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty. (wikipedia.org)
  • During the classical period in Greece (6th, 5th and 4th centuries BCE) and in Hellenistic times, natural philosophy slowly developed into an exciting and contentious field of study. (wikipedia.org)
  • prevent
  • Smeenk and Morgenstern use the term "predestination paradox" to refer specifically to situations in which a time traveler goes back in time to try to prevent some event in the past, but ends up helping to cause that same event. (wikipedia.org)
  • allow
  • Backwards time travel would allow for causal loops involving events, information, people or objects whose histories form a closed loop, and thus seem to "come from nowhere. (wikipedia.org)
  • data
  • It combined streams of sensory data to produce an adaptive, composite impression of surroundings in near real-time. (innovations-report.com)
  • The company's flagship product suite uses proprietary web technology to extract revenue-driving factors for brands from a wide spectrum of data sources. (wikipedia.org)
  • advance
  • To predict weather 24 hours in advance, he said, 64,000 people with adding machines would have to work nonstop -- for 24 hours. (nytimes.com)
  • A second set of results was published in 1968, this time claiming performance far in advance of any other machine. (wikipedia.org)
  • people
  • Yet these people were clothed in pleasant fabrics that must at times need renewal, and their sandals, though undecorated, were fairly complex specimens of metalwork. (blogspot.com)
  • A causal loop, in the context of time travel or the causal structure of spacetime, is a sequence of events (actions, information, objects, people) in which an event is among the causes of another event, which in turn is among the causes of the first-mentioned event. (wikipedia.org)
  • ability
  • According to her mother, Tatyana Vladimovna, Demkina was a fast learner, but was otherwise a normal child until she was ten years old, at which time her ability began to manifest itself. (wikipedia.org)