• neurosecretory
  • The first is a complex set of neurohormones (neuropeptides) originating in the neurosecretory cells of the insect brain, which are released from the neurohaemal organs, the corpora cardiaca. (brillonline.com)
  • 2002). These factors are produced in neurosecretory cells in the insect nervous system, and stored and released from neurohaemal sites, such as the corpora cardiaca in the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • 3. An electron microscope study of the mesothoracic ganglionic mass and the abdominal nerves which leave it has shown that the axons from the neurosecretory cell bodies in the ganglionic mass some of which at least have previously been shown to contain the diuretic hormone run out into the proximal lengths of the abdominal nerves where they branch. (biologists.org)
  • 5. It is concluded that the release of diuretic hormone in Rhodnius is from a series of swollen neurosecretory axon endings dotted over the surface of those lengths of the peripheral abdominal nerves which lie close to the mesothoracic ganglionic mass. (biologists.org)
  • pupation
  • application of azadirachtin interrupts the development and pupation of insects, which eventually kills them. (wikipedia.org)
  • It was originally described simply as "brain hormone" by early workers such as Stefan Kopeć (1922) and Vincent Wigglesworth (1934), who realized that ligation of the head of immature insects could prevent molting or pupation of the body region excluded from the head if the ligation was performed before a critical age in the lifestage was reached. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is during pupation that the adult structures of the insect are formed while the larval structures are broken down. (wikipedia.org)
  • herbivores
  • Here, we report on the discovery of potent JH antagonists in plants, which represents an innate resistance mechanism of plants against insect herbivores. (ups-tlse.fr)
  • Abies balsamea Insect herbivores such as bark beetles and their symbiotic fungal pathogens, pose as one of the greatest threats to conifer survival. (wikipedia.org)
  • PTTH
  • PTTH is secreted by a neurohemal organ, the corpus cardiacum (in some insects the corpus allatum secretes PTTH) which is actually a discrete structure posterior to the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • diuretic
  • Excretion is under the control of diuretic and anti-diuretic factors, or hormones, comprehensively reviewed by Coast et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • It has been known for many years that insects possess diuretic and antidiuretic factors, but it has only been comparatively recently that technological advances have allowed for them to be characterised. (wikipedia.org)
  • To date, the only insect for which both diuretic and antidiuretic hormones (acting directly on tubules) have been isolated is a beetle, the mealworm Tenebrio molitor (Tenebrionidae). (wikipedia.org)
  • Functions of diuretic and antidiuretic hormones include: postprandial diuresis, post-eclosion diuresis, excretion of excess metabolic water, clearance of toxic wastes and restricting metabolite loss (Coast et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • As a result, the effects of diuretic peptides are often tested only on the tubules and their role in other parts of the insect excretory system is not investigated. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are three main families of diuretic hormones: the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-related peptides, calcitonin (CT)-like peptides and the insect kinins (Coast et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2000). The D. punctata peptide, subsequently named Dippu-DH31, turned out to be the first example of a whole new family of insect diuretic peptides - the calcitonin (CT)-like peptides. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1. This investigation has sought the site of release of the diuretic hormone which appears in the haemolymph of larvae of Rhodnius shortly after they begin feeding. (biologists.org)
  • 4. By constricting fed insects at various positions it has been possible to show that most of the diuretic hormone is released into the region close to but behind the mesothoracic ganglionic mass. (biologists.org)
  • Lepidoptera
  • Lepidoptera (/ˌlɛpɪˈdɒptərə/ lep-i-DOP-tər-ə) is an order of insects that includes butterflies and moths (both are called lepidopterans). (wikipedia.org)
  • molt
  • The level gradually decreases during the development of the insect, allowing it to proceed to successive instars with each molt. (wikipedia.org)
  • After a certain point the ligation had no effect and both sections of the insect would molt or pupate. (wikipedia.org)
  • cells
  • Recent findings in Chris Q. Doe lab have found a novel role of this hormone in regulating temporal gene transitions within neural stem cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • peptides
  • Insect CRF-related peptides are so-called because of their similarity to the CRF-related peptides of vertebrates, which indicates a long evolutionary history. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although only a few orders are represented so far, CRF-related peptides are suspected to be ubiquitous in insects. (wikipedia.org)
  • chemicals
  • It has been clear for well over a hundred years since the first studies by Berthold (1849) that chemicals (that later turned out to be hormones) can unlock specific behaviors that are not accessible to the animal under other conditions. (springer.com)
  • Tenebrio
  • The structure of the protein has been investigated well in fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster), and in some insect species bursicon gene has been sequenced, including the mosquito (Anopheles gambiae), cricket (Gryllus bimaculatus), locust (Locusta migratoria), and mealworm (Tenebrio molitor). (wikipedia.org)
  • roles
  • Juvenile hormone (JH) plays key roles in insect development, reproduction, and many other physiological functions. (ups-tlse.fr)
  • Thus, investigating the roles of hormones in social insects, and especially in primitively eusocial species, can not only contribute to our understanding of questions pertaining to the proximate mechanisms underlying reproduction, but also shed light on the ultimate mechanisms leading to the transition from solitary to social life. (biologists.org)
  • These compounds play important roles in conifers as the second line of defense against insect induced trauma and fungal pathogens. (wikipedia.org)
  • Development
  • Because of their rigid exoskeleton, insects grow in their development by successively shedding their exoskeleton (a process known as molting). (wikipedia.org)
  • It s unclear as to why exactly C. stygia is not affected by the drug though it has been consumed by the from, which came from the fly's food source, when most other insects show severe impairments in larval development. (wikipedia.org)
  • fungal
  • aerobiology The study of organic particles, such as bacteria, fungal spores, very small insects, pollen grains and viruses, which are passively transported by the air. (wikipedia.org)
  • vertebrate
  • Comparatively recently, a peptide was isolated from the cockroach Diploptera punctata that showed no similarity to any known insect peptide but did show some similarity to vertebrate calcitonin (Furuya et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • reproduction
  • The ability to chemically reduce JH titer provides us with a non-intrusive method to probe the evolutionary changes associated with JH and the hormonal mechanisms that are associated with reproduction and behavior in social insects. (biologists.org)
  • Reproductive division of labor is a hallmark of social insects, where only one or a few females reproduce while the others remain sterile, raising both proximate and ultimate questions about the mechanisms regulating reproduction and the origin of sociality. (biologists.org)
  • Sesquiterpenoid JHAs continue to be produced up to twelve days later to prevent further insect reproduction. (wikipedia.org)