• homoserine
  • In plants and microorganisms, threonine is synthesized from aspartic acid via α-aspartyl-semialdehyde and homoserine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other names in common use include threonine synthetase, and O-phospho-L-homoserine phospho-lyase (adding water). (wikipedia.org)
  • The resistance to homoserine/threonine (RhtB) family (TC# 2.A.76) belongs to the lysine exporter (LysE) superfamily of transporters. (wikipedia.org)
  • deamination
  • The catalytic domain of this isoform is extremely resistant to proteolysis, while the regulatory domain degrades readily, so upon ingestion by another organism, the threonine deamination capabilities of the enzyme go unchecked. (wikipedia.org)
  • enzymes
  • The mechanism of threonine ammonia-lyase is analogous to other deaminating PLP enzymes in its use of Schiff base intermediates. (wikipedia.org)
  • synthetase
  • Other names in common use include threonyl-tRNA synthetase, threonyl-transfer ribonucleate synthetase, threonyl-transfer RNA synthetase, threonyl-transfer ribonucleic acid synthetase, threonyl ribonucleic synthetase, threonine-transfer ribonucleate synthetase, threonine translase, threonyl-tRNA synthetase, and TARS. (wikipedia.org)
  • ammonia
  • Exceeding the recommended doses of Threonine can cause the formation of too much urea and consequently ammonia toxicity in your body. (herbalremedies.com)
  • Threonine ammonia-lyase has been shown to not follow Michaelis-Menten kinetics, rather, it is subject to complex allosteric control. (wikipedia.org)
  • Multiple forms of threonine ammonia-lyase have been observed in a variety of species of organism. (wikipedia.org)
  • In plants, threonine ammonia-lyase is important in defense mechanisms against herbivores and is upregulated in response to abiotic stress. (wikipedia.org)
  • anaerobic
  • In many bacteria, the biodegradative isoform of the enzyme is expressed in anaerobic conditions and is promoted by cAMP and threonine, while the biosynthetic isoform is expressed in aerobic conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • belongs
  • Threonine-tRNA ligase (TARS) belongs to the family of ligases, to be specific those forming carbon-oxygen bonds in tRNA and related compounds. (wikipedia.org)