• Humans
  • Humans have long pondered the nature of their mind/brain and, particularly why its capacities for reasoning, communication and abstract thought are far superior to other species, including closely related anthropoids. (blogspot.com)
  • Displays of non-white humans as examples of "earlier stages" of human evolution were common in the early 20th century, when racial theories were frequently intertwined with concepts from evolutionary biology. (wikipedia.org)
  • The use of burial rituals is thought to be evidence of religious activity, and there is no other evidence that religion existed in human culture before humans reached behavioral modernity. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, chimpanzees have been known to escape from pens closed with multiple latches, which was previously thought could only have been figured out by humans who understood causality. (wikipedia.org)
  • traits
  • Cultural evolution, the domain of research focused on how culture changes through time due to different individual transmission mechanisms and population-level effects, often uses models derived from population genetics, in which agents are passive recipients of cultural traits (e.g. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rather than a passive receptacle of cultural material, Boyd and Richerson (1985, 2005) suggest that our minds consist of psychological mechanisms which direct our attention to and imitate cultural traits depending on the frequency of that trait, the content of it, who carries it, etc. (wikipedia.org)
  • Barbara King argues that while non-human primates are not religious, they do exhibit some traits that would have been necessary for the evolution of religion. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mentifact (sometimes called a "psychofact") is a term coined by Sir Julian Sorell Huxley, used together with the related terms "sociofact" and "artifact" to describe how cultural traits, such as "beliefs, values, ideas", take on a life of their own spanning over generations, and are conceivable as objects in themselves. (wikipedia.org)
  • phenomena
  • The Epidemiology of representations, or cultural epidemiology, is a broad framework for understanding cultural phenomena by investigating the distribution of mental representations in and through populations. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cerebral neocortex is presumed to be responsible for the neuronal computations underlying complex phenomena such as perception, thought, language, attention, episodic memory and voluntary movement. (wikipedia.org)
  • A meme acts as a unit for carrying cultural ideas, symbols, or practices, that can be transmitted from one mind to another through writing, speech, gestures, rituals, or other imitable phenomena with a mimicked theme. (wikipedia.org)
  • The word meme is a shortening (modeled on gene) of mimeme (from Ancient Greek μίμημα pronounced [míːmɛːma] mīmēma, "imitated thing", from μιμεῖσθαι mimeisthai, "to imitate", from μῖμος mimos, "mime") coined by British evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins in The Selfish Gene (1976) as a concept for discussion of evolutionary principles in explaining the spread of ideas and cultural phenomena. (wikipedia.org)
  • Anthropology
  • Evolutionary psychological accounts of culture, especially cultural epidemiology, may seem at odds with other disciplines in psychology and anthropology, especially research in cultural evolution (e.g. (wikipedia.org)
  • To demonstrate the fledgling discipline of anthropology, the noted scientist W. J. McGee intended to display "representatives of all the world's peoples, ranging from smallest pygmies to the most gigantic peoples, from the darkest blacks to the dominant whites" to show what was commonly thought then to be a sort of cultural evolution. (wikipedia.org)
  • The emergence of religious behavior by the Neolithic period has been discussed in terms of evolutionary psychology, the origin of language and mythology, cross-cultural comparison of the anthropology of religion, as well as evidence for spirituality or cultic behavior in the Upper Paleolithic, and similarities in great ape behavior. (wikipedia.org)
  • abstract thought
  • What's more impressive is our ability to design tools to attain a certain objective by using only our imagination (abstract thought) rather than the ability to pick up a rock from the vicinity to carve up a carcass. (slashdot.org)
  • There are many, many other issues to consider, such as environmental pressure or the lack thereof, and the difficulty of abstract thought before there were any abstractions - the bootstrap problem. (slashdot.org)
  • philosophical
  • They held that culture must be studied using the Hegelian concept of immanent critique: the theory that adequate description and criticism of a philosophical or cultural text must be carried out in the same terms that text itself employs, in order to develop its internal inconsistencies in a manner that allows intellectual advancement. (wikipedia.org)
  • Trends
  • Trends in Ecology and Evolution 15: 27-32. (springer.com)
  • Trends in Ecology and Evolution 11: 453-457. (springer.com)
  • He is best known for his analysis of contemporary cultural trends. (wikipedia.org)
  • Jameson's dissertation, though it drew on a long tradition of European cultural analysis, differed markedly from the prevailing trends of Anglo-American academia (which were empiricism and logical positivism in philosophy and linguistics, and New Critical formalism in literary criticism). (wikipedia.org)
  • Trends in Ecology & Evolution, 10(5), 206-211. (wikipedia.org)
  • culture
  • We may summarize our discussion of energy and tools in the following law of cultural development: culture advances as the amount of energy harnessed per capita per year increases, or as the efficiency or economy of the means of controlling energy is increased, or both. (prezi.com)
  • It was composed of many competing theories by various anthropologists and sociologists, who believed that Western culture is the contemporary pinnacle of social evolution. (wikipedia.org)
  • While the Orthodox Marxist view of ideology held that the cultural "superstructure" was completely determined by the economic "base", the Western Marxists critically analyzed culture as a historical and social phenomenon alongside economic production and distribution or political power relationships. (wikipedia.org)
  • In contrast to genetic programs, cultural evolution investigates how culture itself may evolve (Mesoudi, 2009). (wikipedia.org)
  • Gene-culture coevolution studies how culture and genetic evolution influence each other, ultimately shaping behavior, as well. (wikipedia.org)
  • This led to the 2007 publication of his first book: Integral Consciousness and the Future of Evolution: How the Integral Worldview Is Transforming Politics, Culture and Spirituality (Paragon House 2007). (wikipedia.org)
  • 2009 Winning in Afghanistan-An Integral Strategy for Peace, EnlightenNext March/May 2012 Premises and Principles of the Evolutionary Worldview, CulturalEvolution.org 2013 Climate Change Amelioration Plan, CulturalEvolution.org 2014 Depolarizing the American Mind, CulturalEvolution.org* 2015 Fostering Evolution in Islamic Culture, CulturalEvolution.org What is Enlightenment? (wikipedia.org)
  • belief
  • Emerging theories of social evolution reflected a belief that the changes in Europe wrought by the Industrial Revolution and capitalism were obvious improvements. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lewis Wolpert argues that causal beliefs that emerged from tool use played a major role in the evolution of belief. (wikipedia.org)
  • theories
  • Theories of social and cultural evolution are common in modern European thought. (wikipedia.org)
  • Emerging theories of social evolution allowed Europeans to organize their new knowledge in a way that reflected and justified their increasing political and economic domination of others: colonized people were less-evolved, colonizing people were more evolved. (wikipedia.org)
  • Origins
  • The topics covered include the appearance of the first genetic material, the origins of cellular life, evolution and development, selection and adaptation, and genome evolution. (cshlpress.com)
  • integral
  • He is the founder and president of Now & Zen, Inc., and an influential writer in the field of integral thought. (wikipedia.org)
  • As a result of his focus on progressive spirituality and cultural evolution, in the late 1990s McIntosh became involved in the integral movement. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2012 McIntosh partnered with integral authors and former EnlightenNext editors Carter Phipps and Elizabeth Debold, together with University of Colorado philosopher Michael E. Zimmerman, to found the think tank, The Institute for Cultural Evolution. (wikipedia.org)
  • social
  • A social sculpture of sorts - Bringing people together to explore the meaning of Vermont today and it's evolution ahead. (sevendaystickets.com)
  • Unilineal evolution (also referred to as classical social evolution) is a 19th-century social theory about the evolution of societies and cultures. (wikipedia.org)
  • McElreath R, Boyd R (2007) Mathematical Models of Social Evolution. (springer.com)
  • Together with American Political Fictions: War on Errorism (2015), Ars Americana, Ars Politica and American Utopia and Social Engineering form a trilogy of studies of contemporary American political art and of the new social, cultural, and political roles it plays in American society. (wikipedia.org)
  • he made it a standard shorthand for a complex of late-nineteenth-century ideas, a familiar part of the lexicon of social thought. (wikipedia.org)
  • gene
  • The cultural analog to the gene coordinates the minds of people during interaction, whether face-to-face or through various media. (replicatedtypo.com)
  • ideas
  • These contain the earliest recordings of societal thought and exploration of ideas in some length and detail. (wikipedia.org)
  • religion
  • In face of the onslaught of the fundamentalists, some scientists are content to repeat over and over that they believe in evolution but that there is no conflict between science and religion. (edge.org)
  • Religion is trickier - through some quirk in our cultural evolution, one's thoughts about a Supreme Being and the nature of worship have become more closely guarded than our habits in the bedroom. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • previously thought
  • The journal Nature reports that newly discovered tool marks on bones indicates that we were using tools at minimum 800,000 years earlier than previously thought . (slashdot.org)
  • natural
  • He also directs EvoS, a campus-wide program that relates evolution to all aspects of humanity in addition to the natural world. (edge.org)
  • research
  • research papers on intelligent design vs evolution charles eastman essay ethnicity term papers my worst nightmare essay on walk two moons fourth of july audre lorde essay nursing essays on mentorship and the learning urban legends - the killer in the backseat - essays Charles Eastman. (dirtymartinisf.com)
  • kind
  • With apologies to Natalie, I think there's a kind of a silliness to banging away at religious beliefs for their obvious falsehood, when in fact, if you're an evolutionist, the only way you would want to evaluate these beliefs is to examine what they cause people to do. (edge.org)
  • Itself
  • The term itself emerged in the 1880s, and it gained widespread currency when used after 1944 by opponents of these ways of thinking. (wikipedia.org)
  • tools
  • Our present ability to think of new tools in an environment surrounded by them is not, perhaps, that impressive. (slashdot.org)