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  • Otto von Guer
  • The history of thermodynamics as a scientific discipline generally begins with Otto von Guericke who, in 1650, built and designed the world's first vacuum pump and demonstrated a vacuum using his Magdeburg hemispheres. (wikipedia.org)
  • combustion
  • In 1865, the German physicist Rudolf Clausius, in his Mechanical Theory of Heat, suggested that the principles of thermochemistry, e.g. the heat evolved in combustion reactions, could be applied to the principles of thermodynamics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Physics
  • Just a year before winning the Nobel Prize, Fermi published Thermodynamics, based on a course of lectures at Columbia University, an enduring work which Dover first reprinted in 1956 and which has been in print continuously since then, one of the foundations of Dover's physics program. (google.com)
  • Thermodynamics is a branch of physics that studies the movement of energy and how energy instills movement. (wikiquote.org)
  • describes
  • Atmospheric thermodynamics describes the effect of buoyant forces that cause the rise of less dense (warmer) air, the descent of more dense air, and the transformation of water from liquid to vapor (evaporation) and its condensation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Approach
  • Despite the thousands of articles and scores of books devoted to solvation thermodynamics, I feel that some fundamen- tal and well-established concepts underlying the traditional approach to this subject are not satisfactory and need revision. (springer.com)
  • Thermodynamics - an Engineering Approach, 4th Ed. (textbook). (wikipedia.org)
  • For a slow change, one can adopt the adiabatic approach and use the instantaneous system's Hamiltonian to derive L D {\displaystyle L_{D}} . An important class of problems in quantum thermodynamics is periodically driven systems. (wikipedia.org)
  • adiabatic
  • The major role of atmospheric thermodynamics is expressed in terms of adiabatic and diabatic forces acting on air parcels included in primitive equations of air motion either as grid resolved or subgrid parameterizations. (wikipedia.org)
  • internal
  • The first law of thermodynamics provides the basic definition of internal energy , associated with all thermodynamic systems , and states the rule of conservation of energy . (wikipedia.org)
  • Presently, biological thermodynamics concerns itself with the study of internal biochemical dynamics as: ATP hydrolysis, protein stability, DNA binding, membrane diffusion, enzyme kinetics, and other such essential energy controlled pathways. (wikipedia.org)
  • mechanical
  • The Oxford English Dictionary says: 'Thermodynamics: the theory of the relations between heat and mechanical energy, and of the conversion of either into the other. (carleton.edu)
  • The whole science of heat is founded Thermometry and Calorimetry , and when these operations are understood we may proceed to the third step, which is the investigation of those relations between the thermal and the mechanical properties of substances which form the subject of Thermodynamics. (wikiquote.org)
  • The initial application of thermodynamics to mechanical heat engines was extended early on to the study of chemical compounds and chemical reactions. (wikipedia.org)
  • study
  • The study of thermodynamics-the science of energy-is a critical element in the education of all types of engineers. (springer.com)
  • Ruppeiner geometry is a type of information geometry used to study thermodynamics. (wikipedia.org)
  • This observation is particularly important in the context of quantum thermodynamics, where it is tempting to study Markovian dynamics with an arbitrary control Hamiltonian. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nucleic acid thermodynamics is the study of how temperature affects the nucleic acid structure of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). (wikipedia.org)
  • Energy
  • 4 . First law of thermodynamics (Energy is conserved) (This page is not too hard, but you do need to answer a couple of conceptual questions with words. (google.com)
  • Thermodynamics is a branch of science concerned with heat and temperature and their relation to energy and work. (dbpedia.org)
  • In thermodynamics, work performed by a system is the energy transferred by the system to its surroundings, that is fully accounted for solely by macroscopic forces exerted on the system by factors external to it, that is to say, factors in its surroundings. (wikipedia.org)
  • Biological thermodynamics may address the question of whether the benefit associated with any particular phenotypic trait is worth the energy investment it requires. (wikipedia.org)
  • Committee
  • Performance on the test is assessed by the Thermodynamics Area Examination Committee. (purdue.edu)
  • An additional one-hour oral examination may be given at the discretion of the Thermodynamics Area Examination Committee to further assess weaknesses shown on the written test. (purdue.edu)
  • Chemistry
  • Subject: Supramolecular chemistry and thermodynamics of biological evolution, Thermodynamics of origin of life, Macrothermodynamics, Self-assembly of supramolecular structures, Supramolecules and Assemblies, Adaptation, Aging Dear Colleagues, My Institute: URL http://www.biograph.comstar.ru/evolution/ The information in my URL is: Hello to all, I am seeking professional scientists who would like to understand (to comprehend) my thermodynamic theory of the Evolution of Living Beings. (bio.net)
  • In this manner, Lewis, Randall, and Guggenheim are considered as the founders of modern chemical thermodynamics because of the major contribution of these two books in unifying the application of thermodynamics to chemistry. (wikipedia.org)
  • terms
  • In practical terms, thermodynamics not only allows us to predict what minerals will form at different conditions ( forward modeling ), but also allows us to use mineral assemblages and mineral compositions to determine the conditions at which a rock formed ( thermobarometry ). (carleton.edu)
  • papers
  • The term "atmospheric thermodynamics", itself, can be traced to Frank W. Verys 1919 publication: "The radiant properties of the earth from the standpoint of atmospheric thermodynamics" (Occasional scientific papers of the Westwood Astrophysical Observatory). (wikipedia.org)
  • quantities
  • During the past ten years, I have introduced several new quantities which, in my opinion, should replace the conventional measures of solvation thermodynamics. (springer.com)