• Otto von Guer
  • The history of thermodynamics as a scientific discipline generally begins with Otto von Guericke who, in 1650, built and designed the world's first vacuum pump and demonstrated a vacuum using his Magdeburg hemispheres. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2017
  • The Thermodynamics 2017 conference will be the 25th meeting in a series of biennial thermodynamics conferences initiated in 1964 by Harold Springall, championed throughout the 1960s and 1970s by Max McGlashan and Sir John Rowlinson. (rsc.org)
  • Historically
  • Historically, thermodynamics developed out of a desire to increase the efficiency of early steam engines, particularly through the work of French physicist Nicolas LĂ©onard Sadi Carnot (1824) who believed that engine efficiency was the key that could help France win the Napoleonic Wars. (wikipedia.org)
  • describes
  • Atmospheric thermodynamics describes the effect of buoyant forces that cause the rise of less dense (warmer) air, the descent of more dense air, and the transformation of water from liquid to vapor (evaporation) and its condensation. (wikipedia.org)
  • work
  • Advanced Engineering Thermodynamics is the definitive modern treatment of energy and work for today's newest engineers. (wiley-vch.de)
  • Thermodynamics is the study of the relationships between heat, work, and energy. (scienceclarified.com)
  • Nor is it possible to get 'something for nothing,' as the first law of thermodynamics demonstrates: the work output of a system can never be greater than the net energy input. (scienceclarified.com)
  • Endoreversible thermodynamics was discovered in simultaneous work by Novikov and Chambadal, although sometimes mistakenly attributed to Curzon & Ahlborn. (wikipedia.org)
  • In thermodynamics, work performed by a system is the energy transferred by the system to its surroundings, that is fully accounted for solely by macroscopic forces exerted on the system by factors external to it, that is to say, factors in its surroundings. (wikipedia.org)
  • In terms of thermodynamics, the amount of energy capable of doing work during a chemical reaction is measured quantitatively by the change in the Gibbs free energy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Atmospheric thermodynamics is the study of heat-to-work transformations (and their reverse) that take place in the earth's atmosphere and manifest as weather or climate. (wikipedia.org)
  • As the figure shows, this will cause heat to flow from the cold to the hot reservoir without any external work or energy, which violates the second law of thermodynamics. (wikipedia.org)
  • quantum
  • There is an intimate connection of quantum thermodynamics with the theory of open quantum systems. (wikipedia.org)
  • Quantum mechanics inserts dynamics into thermodynamics, giving a sound foundation to finite-time-thermodynamics. (wikipedia.org)
  • This observation is particularly important in the context of quantum thermodynamics, where it is tempting to study Markovian dynamics with an arbitrary control Hamiltonian. (wikipedia.org)
  • For a slow change, one can adopt the adiabatic approach and use the instantaneous system's Hamiltonian to derive L D {\displaystyle L_{D}} . An important class of problems in quantum thermodynamics is periodically driven systems. (wikipedia.org)
  • study
  • Ruppeiner geometry is a type of information geometry used to study thermodynamics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Presently, biological thermodynamics concerns itself with the study of internal biochemical dynamics as: ATP hydrolysis, protein stability, DNA binding, membrane diffusion, enzyme kinetics, and other such essential energy controlled pathways. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nucleic acid thermodynamics is the study of how temperature affects the nucleic acid structure of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). (wikipedia.org)
  • theoretical
  • These sorts of foundations naturally began to be applied towards the development of theoretical models of atmospheric thermodynamics which drew the attention of the best minds. (wikipedia.org)
  • energy
  • The Oxford English Dictionary says: 'Thermodynamics: the theory of the relations between heat and mechanical energy, and of the conversion of either into the other. (carleton.edu)
  • The growing demand for sustainability and energy efficiency has shined a spotlight on the real-world applications of thermodynamics. (wiley-vch.de)
  • Biological thermodynamics may address the question of whether the benefit associated with any particular phenotypic trait is worth the energy investment it requires. (wikipedia.org)
  • German-British medical doctor and biochemist Hans Krebs' 1957 book Energy Transformations in Living Matter (written with Hans Kornberg) was the first major publication on the thermodynamics of biochemical reactions. (wikipedia.org)
  • papers
  • The term "atmospheric thermodynamics", itself, can be traced to Frank W. Verys 1919 publication: "The radiant properties of the earth from the standpoint of atmospheric thermodynamics" (Occasional scientific papers of the Westwood Astrophysical Observatory). (wikipedia.org)
  • predict
  • In practical terms, thermodynamics not only allows us to predict what minerals will form at different conditions ( forward modeling ), but also allows us to use mineral assemblages and mineral compositions to determine the conditions at which a rock formed ( thermobarometry ). (carleton.edu)
  • terms
  • The major role of atmospheric thermodynamics is expressed in terms of adiabatic and diabatic forces acting on air parcels included in primitive equations of air motion either as grid resolved or subgrid parameterizations. (wikipedia.org)