• Immigrants
  • Acculturation, the process through which immigrants assume the dominant characteristics of the society to which they immigrate, may be gauged through either multidimensional acculturation scales or a single dimension (eg, primary language spoken, years of residence). (cdc.gov)
  • These large-scale population changes worldwide have led many scholars, across fields, to study the acculturation and adjustment of immigrants to their new homes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Despite definitions and evidence that acculturation entails a two-way process of change, research and theory have primarily focused on the adjustments and adaptations made by minorities such as immigrants, refugees, and indigenous peoples in response to their contact with the dominant majority. (wikipedia.org)
  • From studying Polish immigrants in Chicago, they illustrated three forms of acculturation corresponding to three personality types: Bohemian (adopting the host culture and abandoning their culture of origin), Philistine (failing to adopt the host culture but preserving their culture of origin), and creative-type (able to adapt to the host culture while preserving their culture of origin). (wikipedia.org)
  • While some scholars offered an assimilation theory, arguing that immigrants would be assimilated into the host society economically, socially and culturally over successive generations, others developed a multiculturalism theory, anticipating that immigrants could maintain their ethnic identities through the integration process to shape the host society with a diversified cultural heritage. (wikipedia.org)
  • sociology
  • Using a consistent analytic framework, each chapter applies a specific theory (from either nursing, psychology, sociology, or management) to a particular clinical population or care delivery issue. (springerpub.com)
  • As it has been approached at different times from the fields of psychology, anthropology, and sociology, numerous theories and definitions have emerged to describe elements of the acculturative process. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fox had published what became a foundational paper "Sibling incest" in the British Journal of Sociology (1962), in which he again defied the overwhelming consensus of opinion, this time on the incest taboo, and revived the neglected theories of Edward Westermarck, coining the term "Westermarck Effect" (as opposed to the "Freud Effect"), now well known in the social sciences. (wikipedia.org)
  • In sociology, the social disorganization theory is one of the most important theories developed by the Chicago School, related to ecological theories. (wikipedia.org)
  • This type of cultural sociology may loosely be regarded as an approach incorporating cultural analysis and critical theory. (wikipedia.org)
  • Part of the legacy of the early development of the field is still felt in the methods (much of cultural sociological research is qualitative) in the theories (a variety of critical approaches to sociology are central to current research communities) and substantive focus of the field. (wikipedia.org)
  • phenomena
  • The book describes how theory analysis models are used to examine various nursing phenomena as they relate to nursing research and professional practice, and provides key examples of how this is accomplished. (springerpub.com)
  • In 1936, Redfield, Linton, and Herskovits provided the first widely used definition of acculturation as: Those phenomena which result when groups of individuals having different cultures come into continuous first-hand contact, with subsequent changes in the original cultural patterns of either or both groups. (wikipedia.org)
  • cultures
  • The editor of the influential American Anthropologist , Leslie Spier, asked for instructions as to whether he should accept for publication papers dealing with "the culture of natives who participate in civilized life … the so-called acculturation studies … of … hybrid cultures …" (American Anthropological Association 1937). (encyclopedia.com)
  • Acculturation is the process of social, psychological, and cultural change that stems from blending between cultures. (wikipedia.org)
  • The effects of acculturation can be seen at multiple levels in both the original (native) and newly adopted (host) cultures. (wikipedia.org)
  • Relating to this, acculturation studies focus on issues arising when groups or individuals from different cultures come into continuous first-hand contact with one another, with subsequent changes taking place in the original cultural patterns of either or both groups. (scielo.org.za)
  • The many models that have been proposed for inter-cultural diffusion are: Migrationism, the spread of cultural ideas by either gradual or sudden population movements Culture circles diffusionism (Kulturkreise)-the theory that cultures originated from a small number of cultures "Kulturkugel" (a German compound meaning "culture bullet", coined by J. P. Mallory), a mechanism suggested by Mallory to model the scale of invasion vs. gradual migration vs. diffusion. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hyperdiffusionism-the theory that all cultures originated from one culture A concept that has often been mentioned in this regard, which may be framed in the evolutionary diffusionism model, is that of "an idea whose time has come" - whereby a new cultural item appears almost simultaneously and independently in several widely separated places, after certain prerequisite items have diffused across the respective communities. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diffusion of this culture and language took place by patron-client systems, which allowed for the absorption and acculturation of other groups into this culture, and explains the strong influence on other cultures with which it interacted. (wikipedia.org)
  • Kim's
  • The first widely published version of Kim's theory is found in the last three chapters of a textbook authored by William Gudykunst with Young Yun Kim as second author. (wikipedia.org)
  • Kim's theory however is self-contradictory for on one hand Kim argues that the newcomer "evolves" toward becoming exactly like the host majority by internalizing the majority's ways of thinking, feeling and behaving while unlearning their own. (wikipedia.org)
  • An example is Young Yun Kim's cross-cultural adaptation theory. (wikipedia.org)
  • widely
  • The term "acculturation" is widely accepted among American anthropologists as referring to those changes set in motion by the coming together of societies with different cultural traditions. (encyclopedia.com)
  • diffusion
  • It has already done so in Europe, where the discovery of a Mediterranean-like TRB farmer in Sweden destroyed theories of "acculturation" in the diffusion of the Neolithic economy into that continent, and I'm sure that similarly interesting things were taking place during prehistory in other parts of the world. (blogspot.com)
  • behaviors
  • Previous analyses of BRFSS among Hispanics by survey language preference, used as a measure of acculturation, have assessed health awareness and behaviors and access to health care (15-18), but, to our knowledge, none have used BRFSS survey language preference to assess the effect of acculturation on fruit and vegetable intake (15-18). (cdc.gov)
  • models
  • In A. Padilla (Ed.), Acculturation: Theory, models and some new findings (pp. 9-25). (springer.com)
  • Indo-Aryan migration models discuss scenarios around the theory of an origin from outside South Asia of Indo-Aryan peoples, an ascribed ethnolinguistic group that spoke Indo-Aryan languages, the predominant languages of North India. (wikipedia.org)
  • generations
  • These works conclude that the immigrant paradox is not actually paradoxical in nature at all, given that most, if not all, of the findings can be explained by non-optimal methodology and differences in acculturation experiences across generations. (wikipedia.org)
  • differences
  • Differential modes and rates of acculturation can result in parent-child differences in cultural orientation, defined as "the degree to which individuals are influenced by and actively engage in the traditions, norms, and practices of a specific culture" ( Tsai and Chentsova-Dutton 2002 , p. 95). (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • among
  • Generous use of figures and tables further demonstrates the complex relationships between and among concepts embedded in the theories. (springerpub.com)
  • Our objective was to determine the extent to which ethnicity and acculturation (indicated by survey language preference) are associated with fruit and vegetable consumption among Hispanics in the United States. (cdc.gov)
  • Acculturation has been associated with overall decline in dietary quality and, particularly among Hispanics, decreased health status with increased acculturation (8-10). (cdc.gov)
  • The theory suggests that, among determinants of a person's later illegal activity, residential location is as significant as or more significant than the person's individual characteristics (e.g., age, gender, or race). (wikipedia.org)
  • research
  • It therefore addresses the need to focus on how theories can be applied in the real world of clinical practice and the research based on it. (springerpub.com)
  • It describes a step-by-step format for evaluating nursing theory's applicability to research, a format that links theory (both middle-range and grand theory) to research on a wide range of clinical populations and care delivery systems. (springerpub.com)
  • This fact gave rise to an action in 1935 by the Social Science Research Council aimed at the better coordination of research in acculturation. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Directions for future research and the benefits of using a person-centered approach in research of acculturation and generational dissonance are discussed. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • In Berman, John J. (Ed), Nebraska Symposium on Motivation, 1989: Cross-cultural perspectives.Current theory and research in motivation, Vol. 37. (wikipedia.org)
  • social
  • The emergence of acculturation as a significant field of study in social science may be readily traced. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Plato also discussed acculturation, arguing that it should be avoided, as he thought it would lead to social disorder. (wikipedia.org)
  • a core principle of social disorganization theory is that place matters. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, the theory suggests that youths from disadvantaged neighborhoods participate in a subculture which approves of delinquency, and that these youths thus acquire criminality in this social and cultural setting. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to the social disorganization theory, there are ecological factors that lead to high rates of crime in these communities, and these factors linked to constantly elevated levels of "high school dropouts, unemployment, deteriorating infrastructures, and single-parent homes" (Gaines and Miller). (wikipedia.org)
  • migration
  • This provides an overview of the development of Indo-European languages, and the spread of these Indo-European languages by migration and acculturation. (wikipedia.org)
  • model
  • Ultimately, the goal of the model is to present a non-determinist, more dynamic account of immigrant and host community acculturation in multicultural settings. (wikipedia.org)
  • sought
  • We sought to compare the proportion of Hispanic versus non-Hispanic whites who met objectives for fruit and vegetable consumption, assess the proportion of Hispanic adults who met objectives for fruit and vegetable consumption by survey language preference (Spanish vs English), and determine the extent to which ethnicity and acculturation, as indicated by survey language preference, were associated with meeting these objectives. (cdc.gov)
  • study
  • Under the chairmanship of Robert Redfield, the committee prepared a short memorandum called "Outline for the Study of Acculturation" (Redfield et al. (encyclopedia.com)
  • American
  • This logico-conjectural attempt to reconstruct the history of kinship terms was completely against the grain of Functionalist orthodoxy in England at the time, and equally critical of the prevailing American theories of acculturation. (wikipedia.org)
  • culture
  • Historically speaking, acculturation is a direct change of one's culture through dominance over another's culture through either military or political conquest. (wikipedia.org)
  • As a major contributor to conflict theory, Marx argued that culture served to justify inequality. (wikipedia.org)
  • ethnic
  • Although Hispanics are a rapidly growing ethnic minority in the United States, the effect of acculturation on the proportion of Hispanics who meet national objectives for fruit and vegetable consumption has not been fully investigated. (cdc.gov)
  • cultural
  • Although the word "acculturation" was coined by J.W. Powell in 1880, the earliest record of acculturation can be found in Sumerian inscriptions from 2370 B.C. These inscriptions laid out rules for commerce and interaction with foreigners designed to limit acculturation and protect traditional cultural practices. (wikipedia.org)
  • studies
  • By 1936, however, studies by Herskovits (1927), Lesser (1933), Redfield (1929), Schapera (1934), and Spier himself (1935) were making it clear that acculturation studies had become an important interest of anthropologists. (encyclopedia.com)
  • place
  • In contrast with this straightforward phrase focused on the conditions under which the changes take place, the term "acculturation" and its derivatives remain somewhat ambiguous. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The theory has not been used to explain organized crime, corporate crime, or deviant behavior that takes place outside neighborhood settings. (wikipedia.org)
  • The basis of this theory is the similarity of the proper nouns and place names, but most of all in the water names of the Baltic and the Adriatic (Odra, Drava, Drama, Drweca, Opawa, Notec, etc. (wikipedia.org)
  • found
  • Pan-Illyrian theories were proposed in the first half the twentieth century by philologists who thought that traces of Illyrian languages could be found in several parts of Europe, outside the Balkan area. (wikipedia.org)