• Urethritis
  • non-specific" is a medical term meaning "specific cause has not been identified", and in this case refers to the detection of urethritis, and the testing for but found negative of gonorrhea. (wikipedia.org)
  • disease
  • Reiter thought he saw a spirochete which he called Treponema forans, related to but distinct from Treponema pallidum, the causative agent of syphilis, and erroneously thought it was the cause, calling the disease Spirochaetosis Arthritica. (wikipedia.org)
  • Everyone respects the men who first described Alzheimer's disease, Down's syndrome, Hodgkin's disease, Dupuytren's contracture and so forth. (drmirkin.com)
  • Others can develop irritable bowel syndrome, heart disease, or high blood pressure. (foodhaccp.com)
  • The book also explores the genetic and immunological status of afflicted individuals in terms of infection, disease progression, symptoms, and treatment options. (asmscience.org)
  • Salmonellosis is associated with later irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • This syndrome is a unique type of myelodysplastic syndrome characterized by a prolonged disease course, a low rate of transformation to an aggressive form of leukemia, and an anemia which in many patients is profound, refractory to traditional therapies (e.g. iron supplements, Erythropoietin), and requiring maintenance red blood cell transfusions. (wikipedia.org)
  • In a small proportion of cases, the disease develops into the life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever, resulting in bleeding, low levels of blood platelets and blood plasma leakage, or into dengue shock syndrome, where dangerously low blood pressure occurs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Historically, patients suffering the cited eosinophil-related syndromes were evaluated for causes of their eosinophilia such as those due to allergic disease, parasite or fungal infection, autoimmune disorders, and various well-known hematological malignancies (e.g. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thrombocytopenia 5 is associated with an increased incidence of developing hematological (e.g. chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, acute myelocytic leukemia, B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, mixed phenotype acute leukemia, Myelodysplastic syndrome, and multiple myeloma) and non-hematological (e.g. skin and colon) cancers as well as non-malignant diseases such as refractory anemia myopathies, and gastroesophageal reflux disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chronic symptoms are well described and are known as post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome, often called chronic Lyme disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • eosinophilia
  • Clonal hypereosinophilia, also termed Primary hypereosinophelia or clonal eosinophilia, is a grouping of hematological disorder characterized by the development and growth of a pre-malignant or malignant population of eosinophils, a type of white blood cell, in the bone marrow, blood, and/or other tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • Based on their association with eosinophils, unique genetic mutations, and known or potential sensitivity to tyrosine kinase inhibitors or other specific drug therapies, they are now in the process of being classified together under the term clonal hypereosinophilia or clonal eosinophilia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Discovery of genetic mutations underlining these eosinophilia syndromes lead to their removal from CEL-NOS or HES categories and classification as myeloid and lymphoid neoplasms associated with eosinophilia and abnormalities of PDGFRA, PDGFRB, FGFR1, and, tentatively, PCMA-JAK2. (wikipedia.org)
  • ETV6
  • The most common of these rare mutations is the translocation of PDGFRB gene with the ETV6 gene (also termed ETS variant gene 6). (wikipedia.org)
  • Two unrelated kindreds were found to have autosomal dominant inherited mutations in the ETV6 gene, one family with a germline DNA substitution termed L349P that lead to replacing leucine with proline at amino acid 349 in the DNA binding domain of the ETV6, the second, termed N385fs, in germline DNA caused the lose of five base pairs ETV6 and a truncated ETV6 protein. (wikipedia.org)
  • hypereosinophilic syndrome
  • Absent these causes, patients were diagnosed in the World Health Organization's classification as having either 1) Chronic eosinophilic leukemia, not otherwise specified, (CEL-NOS) if blood or bone marrow blast cells exceeded 2% or 5% of total nucleated cells, respectively, and other criteria were met or 2) idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) if there was evidence of eosinophil-induced tissue damage but no criteria indicating chronic eosinophilic leukemia. (wikipedia.org)
  • symptoms
  • The classical presentation of the syndrome starts with urinary symptoms such as burning pain on urination ( dysuria ) or an increased frequency of urination. (wikipedia.org)
  • If you notice medical symptoms or feel ill, you should consult your doctor - for further information see our Terms and conditions . (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • In a just released article in the American Journal of Psychiatry, A large proportion of patients with severe, refractory depression have metabolic disorders that, once treated, appear to alleviate depressive symptoms over the long term. (wikipedia.org)
  • In those who develop persistent symptoms, long-term antibiotic therapy has not been found to be useful. (wikipedia.org)
  • genes
  • The gene is flanked by the genes for granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and Colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (also termed macrophage-colony stimulating factor receptor), all three of which may be lost together by a single deletional mutation thereby causing development of the 5q-syndrome. (wikipedia.org)
  • Human chromosome 5 deletions that remove three adjacent genes, those for granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, PDGFRB, and Colony stimulating factor 1 receptor, cause the Chromosome 5q deletion syndrome (5q- syndrome). (wikipedia.org)
  • Spontaneous beta waves are also observed diffusely in scalp EEG recordings from children with duplication 15q11.2-q13.1 syndrome (Dup15q) who have duplications of GABAA receptor subunit genes GABRA5, GABRB3, and GABRG3. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diseases
  • Written and edited by leading experts, Sequelae and Long-Term Consequences of Infectious Diseases reviews the mechanisms used by pathogens to infect mucous surfaces, enter and multiply in the host environment, interfere with host defenses, damage host tissues, and produce long-term consequences. (asmscience.org)
  • Sequelae and Long-Term Consequences of Infectious Diseases fills a critical void in the scientific literature, offering evidence of the causal links between infectious agents and chronic disorders and, most importantly, stimulating new research in this area. (asmscience.org)
  • occur
  • Shock (dengue shock syndrome) and hemorrhage (dengue hemorrhagic fever) occur in less than 5% of all cases of dengue, however those who have previously been infected with other serotypes of dengue virus ("secondary infection") are at an increased risk. (wikipedia.org)
  • complications
  • Another chapter discusses epidemiological methods for confirming, refuting, or modifying the links between specific microorganisms and the complications and long-term consequences they cause. (asmscience.org)
  • frequency
  • Berger termed the larger amplitude, slower frequency waves that appeared over the posterior scalp when the subject's eye were closed alpha waves. (wikipedia.org)
  • The smaller amplitude, faster frequency waves that replaced alpha waves when the subject opened his or her eyes were then termed beta waves. (wikipedia.org)
  • infection
  • infection with one type usually gives lifelong immunity to that type, but only short-term immunity to the others. (wikipedia.org)
  • gene
  • also termed Pre-mRNA 3'-end-processing factor FIP1) is a protein that in humans is encoded by the FIP1L1 gene (also known as Rhe, FIP1, and hFip1). (wikipedia.org)
  • chronic
  • Philadelphia chromosome positive chronic myelogenous eukemia is now successfully treated with maintenance tyrosine kinase inhibiting drugs to achieve its long-term suppression. (wikipedia.org)
  • physician
  • During World War I, Reiter worked first as a German military physician on the Western Front in France. (wikipedia.org)
  • HE WAS EVEN WRONG ABOUT THE SYNDROME NAMED AFTER HIM: During World War I, the despicable Dr. Reiter had served as a military physician on the Western Front and in the Balkans. (drmirkin.com)
  • develop
  • The error probably was influenced by his previous discovery of Leptospira icterohaemorrhagica, and by his work on Treponema pallidum that later enabled others to develop the "Reiter Complement Fixation Test" for syphilis. (wikipedia.org)
  • World Wa
  • Reiter was a member of the Schutzstaffel (SS) during World War II and participated in medical experiments performed by the Nazis. (wikipedia.org)
  • During World War II, Dr. Reiter directed medical experiments that killed thousands of unfortunate human beings at the Buchenwald concentration camp. (drmirkin.com)
  • often
  • Union never officially called it quits (playing live shows every so often with guest drummers and bass players), but with Kulick playing along with Grand Funk Railroad, Corabi playing with many bands, most notably Ratt, and both members being tied up in solo projects, Union has been on a long-term hiatus. (wikipedia.org)
  • rare
  • A congenital disorder of glycosylation (previously called carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndrome) is one of several rare inborn errors of metabolism in which glycosylation of a variety of tissue proteins and/or lipids is deficient or defective. (wikipedia.org)