• storms
  • Dust storms commonly occur on spring afternoons in a 3- to 6-h pattern. (deepdyve.com)
  • Dust storms arise when a gust front or other strong wind blows loose sand and dirt from a dry surface. (wikipedia.org)
  • Also with some contributions from Iran, Pakistan and India into the Arabian Sea, and China's significant storms deposit dust in the Pacific. (wikipedia.org)
  • poor management of the Earth's drylands, such as neglecting the fallow system, are increasing dust storms size and frequency from desert margins and changing both the local and global climate, and also impacting local economies. (wikipedia.org)
  • In desert areas, dust and sand storms are most commonly caused by either thunderstorm outflows, or by strong pressure gradients which cause an increase in wind velocity over a wide area. (wikipedia.org)
  • Drought and wind contribute to the emergence of dust storms, as do poor farming and grazing practices by exposing the dust and sand to the wind. (wikipedia.org)
  • One poor farming practice which contributes to dust storms is dryland farming. (wikipedia.org)
  • In a semi-arid climate, these practices increase susceptibility to dust storms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dust storms can carry large amounts of dust, with the leading edge being composed of a wall of thick dust as much as 1.6 km (0.99 mi) high. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dust and sand storms which come off the Sahara Desert are locally known as a simoom or simoon (sîmūm, sîmūn). (wikipedia.org)
  • The Sahara desert is a key source of dust storms, particularly the Bodélé Depression and an area covering the confluence of Mauritania, Mali, and Algeria. (wikipedia.org)
  • Saharan dust storms have increased approximately 10-fold during the half-century since the 1950s, causing topsoil loss in Niger, Chad, northern Nigeria, and Burkina Faso. (wikipedia.org)
  • In Mauritania there were just two dust storms a year in the early 1960s, but there are about 80 a year today, according to Andrew Goudie, a professor of geography at Oxford University. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2017
  • Wang, Lei 2017-09-15 00:00:00 AbstractAirborne dust derived from desertification in northern China can be transported to East Asia and other regions, impairing human health and affecting the global climate. (deepdyve.com)
  • The Dust Bowl forced tens of thousands of poverty-stricken families to abandon their farms, unable to pay mortgages or grow crops, and losses reached $25 million per day by 1936 (equivalent to $440,000,000 in 2017). (wikipedia.org)
  • A 2017 lawsuit in Maryland claims that fugitive dust from a 215-foot (66 m)-high pile of coal dust at a coal processing plant has caused "extensive damage" through erosion to blades on wind turbines in a nearby wind farm. (wikipedia.org)
  • long term
  • CleanTRACK™ is Trican's long-term road dust suppression technology. (tricanwellservice.com)
  • The Chinese Loess Plateau, the world's largest and oldest loess record, preserves evidence of Asia's long-term dust source dynamics, but there is uncertainty over the source of the deposits. (cambridge.org)
  • Long Term Evolution (LTE) is a high-speed data service, similar to WiMax, but designed to be more compatible with existing GSM systems. (openmoko.org)
  • Amerasians born during the Vietnam War (1964-75) could be the issue of anything from long-term unions to rape. (wikipedia.org)
  • wood dust
  • In response to a request from the Safety Coordinator of Silver Mountain Enterprises (SIC-2499), an investigation was begun into possible wood dust and noise exposures at their manufacturing facility in Montrose, Colorado. (cdc.gov)
  • Short term wood dust exposures ranged from 0.2 to 4.1mg/m3. (cdc.gov)
  • Industrially, the correct term is wood dust. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sawdust or wood dust is a by-product or waste product of woodworking operations such as sawing, milling, planing, routing, drilling and sanding. (wikipedia.org)
  • Wood dust is also the byproduct of certain animals, birds and insects which live in wood, such as the woodpecker and carpenter ant. (wikipedia.org)
  • Research on wood dust health hazards comes within the field of occupational health science, and study of wood dust control comes within the field of indoor air quality engineering. (wikipedia.org)
  • Wood dust is a known human carcinogen. (wikipedia.org)
  • All these organisations recognize wood dust as carcinogenic in relation to the nasal cavities and paranasal sinuses. (wikipedia.org)
  • People can be exposed to wood dust in the workplace by breathing it in, skin contact, or eye contact. (wikipedia.org)
  • grains
  • At wind speeds above that which causes the smallest to suspend, there will be a population of dust grains moving by a range of mechanisms: suspension, saltation and creep. (wikipedia.org)
  • Its definition is somewhat artificial in that the value of the cosmological constant must be carefully chosen to match the density of the dust grains, but this spacetime is an important pedagogical example. (wikipedia.org)
  • infty ,} where ω {\displaystyle \omega } is a nonzero real constant, which turns out to be the angular velocity of the surrounding dust grains around the y axis, as measured by a "non-spinning" observer riding one of the dust grains. (wikipedia.org)
  • As we shall see, the dust grains stay at constant values of x, y, and z. (wikipedia.org)
  • This frame defines a family of inertial observers who are comoving with the dust grains. (wikipedia.org)
  • soil
  • During the drought of the 1930s, the unanchored soil turned to dust, which the prevailing winds blew away in huge clouds that sometimes blackened the sky. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fugitive dust results from dry conditions where there is insufficient moisture content in the ground to hold the soil together. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dry and disturbed surfaces can release wind-borne fugitive dust for many months before there is sufficient rainfall to coagulate the soil. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1930s
  • The term bụi đời ("dust of life") originally referred to the starving people of the countryside taking refuge in towns, in the 1930s. (wikipedia.org)
  • Philippe M. F. Peycam - The Birth of Vietnamese Political Journalism: Saigon, 1916-1930 Page 24 2012 "Often referred to as bụi đời [dust of life], they were described by the communist newspaper of the 1930s, La Lutte, as the "starving people from the countryside taking refuge in towns. (wikipedia.org)
  • drought
  • The drought and erosion of the Dust Bowl affected 100,000,000 acres (400,000 km2) that centered on the panhandles of Texas and Oklahoma and touched adjacent sections of New Mexico, Colorado, and Kansas. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bowl
  • Edward Stanley, Kansas City news editor of the Associated Press coined the term "Dust Bowl" while rewriting Geiger's news story. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Dust Bowl has been the subject of many cultural works, notably the novel The Grapes of Wrath (1939) by John Steinbeck, the folk music of Woody Guthrie, and photographs depicting the conditions of migrants by Dorothea Lange. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Dust Bowl area lies principally west of the 100th meridian on the High Plains, characterized by plains which vary from rolling in the north to flat in the Llano Estacado. (wikipedia.org)
  • finer
  • The use of neural dust in conjunction with motor prostheses could allow for a much finer control of movement While methods of electrical stimulation of nerves and brain tissue have already been employed for some time, the size and wireless nature of neural dust allows for advancement in clinical applications of the technique. (wikipedia.org)
  • practice
  • Metalloids are sometimes called semimetals, a practice that has been discouraged, as the term semimetal has a different meaning in physics than in chemistry. (wikipedia.org)
  • In practice, a medical treatment could introduce thousands of neural dust devices into human brains. (wikipedia.org)
  • sensor
  • The principle components of the neural dust system include the sensor nodes (neural dust), which aim to be in the 10-100 µm3 scale, and a sub-cranial interrogator, which would sit below the dura mater and would provide both power and a communication link to the neural dust. (wikipedia.org)
  • Due to the extremely small size of the neural dust motes, it would be impractical and nearly impossible to create a functional transmitter in the sensor itself. (wikipedia.org)
  • In one proposed model of the neural dust sensor, the transistor model allowed for a method of separating between local field potentials and action potential "spikes", which would allow for a greatly diversified wealth of data acquirable from the recordings. (wikipedia.org)
  • collisions
  • This dust is likely to be the result of collisions between objects in an orbiting debris disk, which is analogous to the Kuiper belt in the Solar System. (wikipedia.org)
  • resolve
  • With a contrast that is 1,000 times better than that achievable with the Hubble Space Telescope, HabEx could resolve large dust structures, tracing the gravitational effect of planets. (wikipedia.org)
  • building materials
  • While it exists in nature mainly as quartz, silica is also used in manufacturing building materials, foundry and respirable silica dust is produced during mining activities. (miningnewszambia.com)
  • refers
  • The Vietnamese term bụi đời ("dust of life") refers to vagrants in the city, or, trẻ bụi đời to street children or juvenile gangs. (wikipedia.org)
  • The term trẻ bụi đời "young vagrants," now refers to street children or juvenile gang members. (wikipedia.org)
  • The term bụi đời in Vietnam today refers to any people, but usually young men, who live on the street or live as wanderers. (wikipedia.org)
  • atmosphere
  • The term is used to denote that the dust "escapes" into the atmosphere rather than being exhausted in a "confined flow stream" from a "ducted emitter" (an exhaust pipe or chimney). (wikipedia.org)
  • Definition
  • The prologue to The Beautiful Country opens with a definition: "Bui Doi: 'less than dust' Term used to describe Vietnamese children with American fathers. (wikipedia.org)
  • source
  • Our zircon and garnet data demonstrates, however, that Beiguoyuan experienced a temporary, abrupt source shift during the last glacial maximum, implying that local dust sources became periodically active during the Quaternary. (cambridge.org)
  • Because everyone knows that open source is not magic pixie dust. (slashdot.org)
  • At least six samplers were needed downstream of a dust source. (wikipedia.org)
  • uses
  • citation needed] The 1994 documentary film Bui doi: Life Like Dust uses the term to describe Ricky Phan, a Vietnamese refugee who turned to a life of crime after escaping from Vietnam to California. (wikipedia.org)
  • high
  • In other instances, dust (but not sand) may be lifted as high as 20,000 feet (6,100 m) high. (wikipedia.org)
  • contain
  • Dirt roads can be sprayed with water to contain dust, or stabilized with chemicals that form hard surface crusts, or paved with aggregate or a hard surface. (wikipedia.org)
  • system
  • This will put the Solar System in perspective not only in terms of exoplanet populations, but also in terms of dust belt morphologies. (wikipedia.org)
  • While the terms can sometimes be used interchangeably, the main differences is that while BCI generally interface neural activity directly to a computer, neuroprosthetics tend to connect activity in the central nervous system to a device meant to replace the function of a missing or impaired body part. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • In the West, the term Bui-Doi became widely known from the use in the dialogue, and particularly the song title "Bui-Doi", of the 1989 musical Miss Saigon by Claude-Michel Schönberg and Alain Boublil, which opened in 1991 on Broadway, and, until its closing in 2001, was the eleventh longest running Broadway musical in musical theater history. (wikipedia.org)
  • While neural dust does fall under the category of BCI, it also could be used in the field of neuroprosthetics (also known as neural prosthetics). (wikipedia.org)
  • sources
  • Additionally, we suggest that multi-proxy single-grain approaches are required to gain further insight into Chinese Loess Plateau dust sources. (cambridge.org)
  • Surface mining operations are also sources of fugitive dust as a result of many mining operations including haul roads, tailing piles, drilling, blasting, the removal of overburden and the actual mineral extraction. (wikipedia.org)
  • areas
  • Dust storm-prone areas are consistent with the spatial distribution of northern China deserts where the average wind speed (AWS) is more than 2 m s−1, the mean annual temperature (MAT) ranges from 5° to 10°C, and the mean annual precipitation (MAP) is less than 450 mm. (deepdyve.com)
  • rock
  • The respirable crystalline silica dust elements are almost 100 times smaller than a grain of sand and they can be released into the air when rock or products made from rock are cut or crushed. (miningnewszambia.com)
  • The conversion of sediment to rock is termed lithification . (britannica.com)
  • allows
  • The method is based on an aerodynamic updated process of dust collection and allows changeover to an energy-saving technology for production of refractory materials. (deepdyve.com)
  • method
  • 2004-10-09 00:00:00 A new method for dry dust collection is proposed. (deepdyve.com)
  • A new method for dry dust collection is proposed. (deepdyve.com)
  • Neural dust employs this method by having the sub-dural communicator send out an ultrasound pulse that is then reflected by the neural dust sensors. (wikipedia.org)
  • local
  • Like any other Lorentzian spacetime, the Gödel solution presents the metric tensor in terms of some local coordinate chart. (wikipedia.org)
  • technology
  • Wishlist:Unlikely - Hardware that is unlikely to appear in any Openmoko device, due to it being impossible to fabricate with near-term technology, or for other reasons. (openmoko.org)
  • While many forms of BCI exist, neural dust is in a class of its own due to its size, wireless capability, and use of ultrasound technology. (wikipedia.org)
  • usually
  • A related verb đi bụi ("go dust") means someone who has left their home, usually due to arguments with their family, to take on the bụi đời wandering or street life. (wikipedia.org)
  • products
  • Two waste products, dust and chips, form at the working surface during woodworking operations such as sawing, milling and sanding. (wikipedia.org)
  • refer
  • The terms liner notes, sleeve notes are used to refer to this label, jacket information. (wikipedia.org)
  • Neural dust is a term used to refer to millimeter-sized devices operated as wirelessly powered nerve sensors. (wikipedia.org)
  • mean
  • What does dust%20cover mean? (abbreviations.com)
  • The song "Bui-Doi" had lyrics written by Alain Boublil and Richard Maltby, Jr. They took the term bụi đời to mean not Vietnamese street children, but the Amerasian offspring of American soldiers and Vietnamese mothers abandoned at the end of the Vietnam War. (wikipedia.org)
  • wind
  • In 1995, 28 percent of fugitive dust in the US originated from unpaved roads, 23 percent from construction sites, 19 percent agricultural, 15 percent from paved roads, 5 percent from wind erosion, 1 percent from mining according to the EPA. (wikipedia.org)
  • various
  • Fugitive dust can be controlled by the application of various chemical suppressants including lignin sulfonates, petroleum resins, latexes, salts, plastics, and wetting agents. (wikipedia.org)