• doctorate
  • In the introduction to the 1967 edition of the book, Elliot Schaffer notes that in his short lifetime James Hunt is said to have treated over 1,700 cases of speech impediment, firstly in his father's practice and later at his own institute, Ore House near Hastings, which he set up with the aid a doctorate he had purchased in 1856 from the University of Giessen in Germany. (wikipedia.org)
  • A filial-paternal relationship evolved between "little Rank" and the chief, who gave Rank some financial aid and encouraged him to enter the University of Vienna, from which he received a doctorate in 1912. (encyclopedia.com)
  • After receiving her doctorate in Clinical Psychology from Temple University, Ritterman is noted for her expertise regarding survivors of political torture and their families. (wikipedia.org)
  • While working towards his doctorate in sociology at the University of Heidelberg, Fromm studied the Tanya by the founder of Chabad, Rabbi Shneur Zalman of Liadi. (wikipedia.org)
  • unconscious
  • The unconscious of contemporary psychology is kinder and gentler than that and more reality bound and rational, even if it is entirely cold and dry. (biomedsearch.com)
  • At least to some extent, microglial activation in the brain may activate unconscious drives as "psychological immune memory/reaction" in the mind, and result in various emotions, traumatic reactions, psychiatric symptoms including suicidal behaviors, and (psychoanalytic) transference during interpersonal relationships. (frontiersin.org)
  • theory
  • It is unlikely you saw the December 2000 special issue of the Psychologist, the profession's house magazine, but it was a remarkable event: an open-minded summary of some of this new scientific evidence about Freudian theory from the organ of official psychology. (theguardian.com)
  • The concept was originally introduced by Jennifer Freyd in 1994, betrayal trauma theory, occurs when people or institutions on which a person relies on for protection, resources, and survival violate the trust or well-being of that person. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thus, betrayal trauma offered a theory of psychogenic amnesia designed to evaluate both the role of attachment in human survival and the significance of blocking the painful experience. (wikipedia.org)
  • Recently, Gerald M. Edelman, director of The Neurosciences Institute at The Rockefeller University, has proposed a new theory, one that gives us powerful reasons to revise our ideas about how we think, act, and remember. (nybooks.com)
  • Historians argued that Blassingame's use of psychological theory proved unhelpful in his interpretation. (wikipedia.org)
  • philosopher
  • The American philosopher William James published his seminal book, Principles of Psychology, in 1890, laying the foundations for many of the questions that psychologists would focus on for years to come. (wikibooks.org)
  • During the summer semester of 1919, Fromm studied at the University of Heidelberg, where he began studying sociology under Alfred Weber (brother of the better known sociologist Max Weber), psychiatrist-philosopher Karl Jaspers, and Heinrich Rickert. (wikipedia.org)
  • brain
  • We have learned much about the brain since 1895, yet no equally ambitious attempt has since been made to examine the broad implications of neuroscientific research for the functioning of the brain and for psychology. (nybooks.com)
  • It seems that the brain can tolerate only so much suffering before repression rushes in to block reactivity. (primaltherapy.com)
  • abusive
  • Positing that in the context of abusive betrayals in which escape is not a viable option, the cheater-detecting mechanism may be suppressed for the higher goal of survival. (wikipedia.org)
  • In recent years Ritterman has lectured nationally and internationally on using hypnosis in conjunction with family therapy and more particularly against socially violent governments and their abusive use of psychological methods and techniques. (wikipedia.org)
  • perception
  • In the same letter he writes, "If I could give a complete account of the psychological characteristics of perception and of the [registrations of memory], I should have described a new psychology. (nybooks.com)
  • mental
  • Psychology also refers to the application of such knowledge to various spheres of human activity, including problems of individuals' daily lives and the treatment of mental health problems. (wikibooks.org)
  • aspects
  • Of the different aspects of memory - working, short-term, long-term, etc. - the one most commonly affected by psychological trauma is long-term memory. (wikipedia.org)
  • fear
  • Beginning with his first seminal work of 1941, Escape from Freedom (known in Britain as Fear of Freedom), Fromm's writings were notable as much for their social and political commentary as for their philosophical and psychological underpinnings. (wikipedia.org)
  • work
  • His second important work, Man for Himself: An Inquiry into the Psychology of Ethics, first published in 1947, continued and enriched the ideas of Escape from Freedom. (wikipedia.org)
  • There is the recent work of Weihong Song of the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, who put young mice engineered to develop Alzheimer-like plague, in chambers with reduced oxygen for one month. (primaltherapy.com)
  • One of them, Isaac Spielrein, was a Soviet psychologist, a pioneer of work psychology . (wikipedia.org)
  • As Jennifer Margulis, a scholar of post-colonial studies at Emory University outlines, the issue of languages raises several polemical questions for consideration in the study of literary texts: Does the author choose to work in a local language or a major European one? (wikipedia.org)
  • rather
  • Social justice and advocacy organizations such as Students Against Mass Incarceration (SAMI) at the University of California, San Diego often look to Scandinavian countries Sweden and Norway for guidance in regards to successful prison reform because both countries have an emphasis on rehabilitation rather than punishment. (wikipedia.org)
  • In American Negro Slavery (1918), Phillips refers to slaves as "negroes, who for the most part were by racial quality submissive rather than defiant, light-hearted instead of gloomy, amiable and ingratiating instead of sullen, and whose very defects invited paternalism rather than repression. (wikipedia.org)
  • fight
  • Marcuse discusses the social meaning of biology - history seen not as a class struggle, but a fight against repression of our instincts. (wikipedia.org)
  • however
  • Actually, it plays no role in his far more significant works on art and genetic psychology, which, however, were never to emerge from relative obscurity. (encyclopedia.com)
  • human
  • Her book in progress From Trance to Stance advocates that the primary goal of psychology is to help create a human-friendly society that caters to the bio-rhythms and natural needs of the human organism. (wikipedia.org)
  • Marcuse starts with the conflict described by Freud in Civilization and Its Discontents - the struggle between human instincts and the conscience of repression (superego), which is self-repressing trying to follow the society's mores and norms. (wikipedia.org)
  • different
  • Over the years, various ploys at different stages of university admission process including application, entrance examination and enrollment have been used to exclude Bahá'ís from public and private colleges and universities. (wikipedia.org)
  • often
  • Hardiness is often considered an important factor in psychological resilience or an individual-level pathway leading to resilient outcomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • People
  • 7 ) For example, an argument for Jewish circumcision is that it ensures the survival of the Jewish people. (jewishcircumcision.org)
  • The Bahá'í Institute for Higher Education (BIHE), is a unique open university in Iran, which has been portrayed as an underground university, established by the Bahá'í community of Iran in 1987 to meet the educational needs of young people who have been systematically denied access to higher education by the Iranian government. (wikipedia.org)
  • second
  • Other functions proposed by liberal philosophers, including providing the laws and infrastructure for commerce or protecting individual freedom of citizens, presumptively come second to survival. (encyclopedia.com)
  • History
  • Although Spielrein has been mainly remembered on account of her relationship with Jung, and has sometimes been the subject of lurid speculation, she is now increasingly recognized as an important and innovative thinker who was marginalized in history because of her unusual eclecticism, refusal to join factions, feminist approach to psychology, and her death in the Holocaust . (wikipedia.org)
  • Freud claimed that a clash between Eros and civilization results in the history of Man being one of his repression: "Our civilization is, generally speaking, founded on the suppression of instincts. (wikipedia.org)
  • long
  • Although financial need propelled him toward an engineering career, Rank diverted enough time from his technical studies to begin a book on the psychology of the artist-for long his master theme. (encyclopedia.com)
  • the term Pain is capitalized in discussions of primal therapy when referring to any repressed emotional distress and its purported long-lasting psychological effects. (wikipedia.org)
  • effects
  • As with many areas of psychology, most of these effects are under constant review, trial, and dissent within the scientific world regarding the validity of each topic. (wikipedia.org)
  • ability
  • Memory is described by psychology as the ability of an organism to store, retain, and subsequently retrieve information. (wikipedia.org)
  • any structural, physiological, or behavioral trait that aids an organism's survival and ability to reproduce in its existing environment. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Support
  • Betrayal trauma is defined as a trauma perpetrated by someone with whom the victim is close to and reliant upon for support and survival. (wikipedia.org)
  • individual
  • Main outcome measures: Effect sizes were computed for each individual sample as the correlation coefficient r, based on the relationship between conscientiousness and mortality risk (all-cause mortality risk, longevity, or length of survival). (ucr.edu)
  • issue
  • The issue was guest edited by Bernice Andrews of Royal Holloway College, London, along with Chris Brewin of University College London. (theguardian.com)
  • Germany
  • After the Nazi takeover of power in Germany, Fromm moved first to Geneva and then, in 1934, to Columbia University in New York. (wikipedia.org)