• tibial nerve
  • It is made up of collateral branches of the tibial nerve and common fibular nerve. (wikipedia.org)
  • The tibial nerve and the common fibular nerve arise as the sciatic nerve divides into two branches in the popliteal fossa. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tibial nerve (innervating the plantar surface of the foot)3. (wikipedia.org)
  • Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS), also referred to as posterior tibial nerve stimulation, is the least invasive form of neuromodulation used to treat overactive bladder (OAB) and the associated symptoms of urinary urgency, urinary frequency and urge incontinence. (wikipedia.org)
  • As the goal is to send stimulation through the tibial nerve, it is important to have the needle electrode near (but not on) the tibial nerve. (wikipedia.org)
  • The needle electrode is then connected to an external pulse generator which delivers an adjustable electrical pulse that travels to the sacral plexus via the tibial nerve. (wikipedia.org)
  • In October 2010, the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) issued NICE Interventional Procedure Guidance 362 supporting the use of Percutaneous Tibial Nerve Stimulation (PTNS) as a routine treatment for Overactive Bladder syndrome. (wikipedia.org)
  • unilateral
  • The authors' data also support a role for sural nerve grafting in unilateral neurovascular bundle excision. (mysciencework.com)
  • In 1971 a new technique for facial nerve reconstruction was introduced, as Scaramella and Smith reported on the technique of cross facial nerve grafting (CFNG) for reconstruction of a coordinated smile in unilateral facial paralysis cases. (wikipedia.org)
  • common fibul
  • When the common fibular nerve is divided from the sciatic nerve, it travels parallel to the distal portion of the biceps femoris muscle and towards the fibular head. (wikipedia.org)
  • morphologic
  • Symptoms in DSP are associated with substance use disorders, but no difference in morphologic structure is seen in nerves of patients with HIV infection with and without substance use histories. (biomedsearch.com)
  • proximal
  • The first known surgical repair of an injured facial nerve was performed by Drobnick in 1879, who connected the proximal spinal accessory nerve (innervates trapezius and sternocleidomastoid muscles) to the paralysed facial nerve. (wikipedia.org)
  • latency
  • In addition to modulation, the cutaneous reflex has been shown to evoke both a MLR (medium latency response) and LLR (long latency response) EMG response, indicating that it is a polysynaptic reflex, involving spinal interneurons or supraspinal pathways Cutaneous nerves The cutaneous reflex has been attributed to functional responses to disturbances encountered during locomotion and is, therefore, dependent on which cutaneous nerve is stimulated. (wikipedia.org)
  • interposition nerve
  • Wide excision of the neurovascular bundle and interposition nerve grafting of the cavernous nerves when there is suspected extracapsular extension at the posterolateral prostatic margin are logical applications of improved understanding of pelvic neuroanatomy. (mysciencework.com)
  • The success of the authors' interposition nerve-grafting project has resulted, in part, from the use of a multidisciplinary team approach that includes experienced oncologic surgeons and a plastic surgeon with extensive microsurgical and nerve-grafting experience. (mysciencework.com)
  • If a tension-free reconnection is not possible, interposition nerve grafts are an option. (wikipedia.org)
  • stimuli
  • of ipsilateral cutaneous reflexes were studied with short trains of stimuli presented pseudorandomly to the sural nerve during human walking. (labome.org)
  • Many times, Needle EMG is also performed on subjects at the same time as other NCS procedures because they aid in detecting whether muscles are functioning properly in response to stimuli sent via their connecting nerves. (wikipedia.org)
  • abducens nerve
  • 1 Other known neurological manifestations, often in combination with encephalopathy, are neuroretinitis, oculoglandular disease of Parinaud, myelopathy, radiculopathy or abducens nerve, and facial nerve paresis. (bmj.com)
  • In Moebius-like syndrome, only one side of the face is affected, but with additional nerve palsies of the affected facial and abducens nerve. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patients
  • Patients and Methods: Sural nerve physiology and ultrastructural morphology were studied at baseline and 11 years later in subjects with normal glucose tolerance (NGT), IGT, and T2DM. (lu.se)
  • Although the side effects of sural nerve harvest are minor, the ability to predict preoperatively which patients will benefit from such grafts would reduce the number of failures. (mysciencework.com)
  • The technique for sural nerve grafting described herein gives urologists an additional tool to improve patients' quality of life without compromising the chances of success in treating prostate cancer. (mysciencework.com)
  • Peripheral nerve is assessed to help work up patients with suspected peripheral neuropathies secondary to such conditions as vasculitis and amyloidosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • posterior
  • The nerve then continues down the leg on the posterior-lateral side, then posterior to the lateral malleolus where it runs deep to the fibularis tendon sheath and reaches the lateral tuberosity of the fifth toe, where it ramifies. (wikipedia.org)
  • fiber density
  • Changes in these parameters correlate with anatomical evidence of decreased large and small myelinated fiber densities (MFDs) in the sural nerve ( 4 , 5 ) and the epidermis (intraepidermal nerve fiber density) ( 6 ). (diabetesjournals.org)
  • bladder
  • Damage to the nerves that control bladder function, a condition called neurogenic bladder, causes affected individuals to have progressive difficulty controlling the flow of urine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Among other functions, the sacral nerve plexus regulates bladder and pelvic floor function. (wikipedia.org)
  • damage
  • Sural nerve block is not advised if a patient is allergic to the anesthetic solution, has infected tissue at the injection site, has severe bleeding disorder, or has preexisting neurological damage. (wikipedia.org)
  • The purpose of these studies is to determine whether nerve damage is present and how severe that damage may be. (wikipedia.org)
  • paresis
  • Some head and neck tumours invade or compress the facial nerve leading to facial paresis or paralysis. (wikipedia.org)
  • stimulation
  • These include the: cutaneous nerve stimulated phase of the gait cycle intensity of the stimulation nature of the task being performed rhythmic arm or leg movements complexity of the task. (wikipedia.org)
  • The second electrode records the impulse sent through the nerve as a result of stimulation. (wikipedia.org)
  • restore
  • The authors have shown, as proof of principle in bilaterally resected neurovascular bundle at the time of RRP, that sural nerve grafting can restore erectile function. (mysciencework.com)
  • Dynamic smile reconstruction procedures restore the facial nerve activity. (wikipedia.org)
  • facial nerve
  • Smile surgery or smile reconstruction is a surgical procedure that restores the smile for people with facial nerve paralysis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Facial nerve paralysis is a relatively common condition with a yearly incidence of 0.25% leading to function loss of the mimic muscles. (wikipedia.org)
  • Eight years later, Terzis introduced the "babysitter" procedure, which consists of a combination of CFNGs and a simultaneous partial hypoglossal to facial nerve transfer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sometimes, the facial nerve cannot be preserved during resection of these tumours. (wikipedia.org)
  • Algorithm 1) Neurorrhaphy is a primary end-to-end reconnection of the facial nerve stumps. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, tension-free reconnection is needed, otherwise scar formation can occur and axons will regenerate outside the facial nerve. (wikipedia.org)
  • Algorithm 1) Secondary facial paralysis with a denervation time of less than 6 months can be treated with one or more cross facial nerve grafts (CFNGs). (wikipedia.org)