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  • tibial
  • A branch of the tibial nerve which supplies sensory innervation to parts of the lower leg and foot. (labome.org)
  • It is made up of collateral branches of the tibial nerve and common fibular nerve. (wikipedia.org)
  • The tibial nerve and the common fibular nerve arise as the sciatic nerve divides into two branches in the popliteal fossa. (wikipedia.org)
  • How the two branches fuse, the contribution of the fibular and tibial branch, the location of the connection, and differences between the two lower extremities contribute to variability of this nerve. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tibial nerve (innervating the plantar surface of the foot)3. (wikipedia.org)
  • Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS), also referred to as posterior tibial nerve stimulation, is the least invasive form of neuromodulation used to treat overactive bladder (OAB) and the associated symptoms of urinary urgency, urinary frequency and urge incontinence. (wikipedia.org)
  • As the goal is to send stimulation through the tibial nerve, it is important to have the needle electrode near (but not on) the tibial nerve. (wikipedia.org)
  • The needle electrode is then connected to an external pulse generator which delivers an adjustable electrical pulse that travels to the sacral plexus via the tibial nerve. (wikipedia.org)
  • In October 2010, the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) issued NICE Interventional Procedure Guidance 362 supporting the use of Percutaneous Tibial Nerve Stimulation (PTNS) as a routine treatment for Overactive Bladder syndrome. (wikipedia.org)
  • common fibul
  • When the common fibular nerve is divided from the sciatic nerve, it travels parallel to the distal portion of the biceps femoris muscle and towards the fibular head. (wikipedia.org)
  • innervates
  • The first known surgical repair of an injured facial nerve was performed by Drobnick in 1879, who connected the proximal spinal accessory nerve (innervates trapezius and sternocleidomastoid muscles) to the paralysed facial nerve. (wikipedia.org)
  • interposition nerve
  • Wide excision of the neurovascular bundle and interposition nerve grafting of the cavernous nerves when there is suspected extracapsular extension at the posterolateral prostatic margin are logical applications of improved understanding of pelvic neuroanatomy. (mysciencework.com)
  • The success of the authors' interposition nerve-grafting project has resulted, in part, from the use of a multidisciplinary team approach that includes experienced oncologic surgeons and a plastic surgeon with extensive microsurgical and nerve-grafting experience. (mysciencework.com)
  • If a tension-free reconnection is not possible, interposition nerve grafts are an option. (wikipedia.org)
  • fibularis
  • The nerve then continues down the leg on the posterior-lateral side, then posterior to the lateral malleolus where it runs deep to the fibularis tendon sheath and reaches the lateral tuberosity of the fifth toe, where it ramifies. (wikipedia.org)
  • flap
  • Proximally based sural adipose-cutaneous/scar flap in elimination of ulcerous scar soft-tissue defect over the achilles tendon and posterior heel region: a new approach. (semanticscholar.org)
  • stimuli
  • of ipsilateral cutaneous reflexes were studied with short trains of stimuli presented pseudorandomly to the sural nerve during human walking. (labome.org)
  • Many times, Needle EMG is also performed on subjects at the same time as other NCS procedures because they aid in detecting whether muscles are functioning properly in response to stimuli sent via their connecting nerves. (wikipedia.org)
  • damage
  • Sural nerve block is not advised if a patient is allergic to the anesthetic solution, has infected tissue at the injection site, has severe bleeding disorder, or has preexisting neurological damage. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is due to nerve damage and there are multiple causes of nerve damage. (healthtap.com)
  • Does sural nerve damage cause numbness? (healthtap.com)
  • Chronic paresthesia or intermittent paresthesia over a long period of time is generally a sign of a neurological disease or traumatic nerve damage (e.g. dental implant ). (healthtap.com)
  • Damage to the nerves that supply the perineum may result in penile numbness . (healthtap.com)
  • The purpose of these studies is to determine whether nerve damage is present and how severe that damage may be. (wikipedia.org)
  • Damage to the nerves that control bladder function, a condition called neurogenic bladder, causes affected individuals to have progressive difficulty controlling the flow of urine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patients
  • Patients and Methods: Sural nerve physiology and ultrastructural morphology were studied at baseline and 11 years later in subjects with normal glucose tolerance (NGT), IGT, and T2DM. (lu.se)
  • Although the side effects of sural nerve harvest are minor, the ability to predict preoperatively which patients will benefit from such grafts would reduce the number of failures. (mysciencework.com)
  • The technique for sural nerve grafting described herein gives urologists an additional tool to improve patients' quality of life without compromising the chances of success in treating prostate cancer. (mysciencework.com)
  • amplitude
  • Results: Subjects with T2DM had significantly lower sural nerve amplitude compared to subjects with NGT and IGT at baseline. (lu.se)
  • At follow-up, T2DM showed a reduction in nerve conduction, amplitude, myelinated fiber density, unmyelinated axon diameter, and autophagy structures in myelinated axons. (lu.se)
  • therefore
  • In addition to modulation, the cutaneous reflex has been shown to evoke both a MLR (medium latency response) and LLR (long latency response) EMG response, indicating that it is a polysynaptic reflex, involving spinal interneurons or supraspinal pathways Cutaneous nerves The cutaneous reflex has been attributed to functional responses to disturbances encountered during locomotion and is, therefore, dependent on which cutaneous nerve is stimulated. (wikipedia.org)
  • Function
  • The authors have shown, as proof of principle in bilaterally resected neurovascular bundle at the time of RRP, that sural nerve grafting can restore erectile function. (mysciencework.com)
  • Facial nerve paralysis is a relatively common condition with a yearly incidence of 0.25% leading to function loss of the mimic muscles. (wikipedia.org)
  • sensory
  • Nerve involvement may cause sensory changes with numbness, pain, burning, and weakness (peripheral neuropathy). (wikipedia.org)
  • The indicators of improvements were improvements of sural sensory action potential and subjective improvement of neuropathic symptoms. (wikipedia.org)
  • List of sensory systems Sensory neuron Perception Visual system Auditory system Somatosensory system Vestibular system Olfactory system Taste Pain Neuron Interneuron Ganglion (PNS) vs Nucleus (neuroanatomy) (CNS) except basal ganglia (CNS) Nerve(PNS) vs Tract (neuroanatomy) (CNS) White matter (more myelinated) vs Grey matter Glial cells, commonly called neuroglia or glia, are supportive cells that maintain homeostasis, form myelin, and provide support and protection for the brain's neurons. (wikipedia.org)
  • dorsal
  • Reactivation of latent virus within the dorsal root ganglion of the facial nerve is associated with vesicles affecting the ear canal, and termed Ramsay Hunt syndrome type II. (wikipedia.org)
  • trunk
  • In adults with lower trunk brachial plexus injury, proximal nerve surgery for restoration of prehension demonstrates poor outcomes secondary to long distances required for nerve regeneration and time-dependent degradation of motor endplates. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • bladder
  • Damage to the nerves that control bladder function, a condition called neurogenic bladder, causes affected individuals to have progressive difficulty controlling the flow of urine. (wikipedia.org)
  • chronic
  • Lyme disease, caused by chronic Borrelia burgdorferi infection, is a common cause of facial nerve paralysis in endemic areas. (wikipedia.org)
  • The disorder is sometimes called chronic relapsing polyneuropathy (CRP) or chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (because it involves the nerve roots). (wikipedia.org)
  • fatigue, general malaise peripheral tingling sensations Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, also known as Vidaurri's disease, is believed to be due to immune cells, which normally protect the body from foreign infection, incorrectly attacking the nerves in the body instead. (wikipedia.org)
  • tissue
  • The superficial and deep peroneal nerves as well as the sural nerve are superficial in the subcutaneous tissue plane. (usra.ca)
  • Typically, benign tumors should be removed in a fashion that preserves the facial nerve, while malignant tumors should always be resected along with large areas of tissue around them, including the facial nerve. (wikipedia.org)
  • Examination of tissue biopsied from the sural nerve under a microscope can reveal the presence of polyglucosan bodies. (wikipedia.org)
  • This pathology relates to the inflammation of tissue affecting blood flow and compressing nerves. (wikipedia.org)
  • damage
  • the latter two symptoms due to damage to vestibulocochlear nerve and the inner ear. (wikipedia.org)
  • The facial paralysis can follow immediately the trauma due to direct damage to the facial nerve, in such cases a surgical treatment may be attempted. (wikipedia.org)
  • tendon
  • Options for reconstruction are limited to distal tendon or nerve transfers and free-functioning muscle transfers. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • infection
  • Otitis media is an infection in the middle ear, which can spread to the facial nerve and inflame it, causing compression of the nerve in its canal. (wikipedia.org)
  • transient
  • Soma Axon Myelin Dendrite Dendritic spine An action potential (or nerve impulse) is a transient alteration of the transmembrane voltage (or membrane potential) across the membrane in an excitable cell generated by the activity of voltage-gated ion channels embedded in the membrane. (wikipedia.org)
  • Transient trauma to the nerve can result from peroneal strike. (wikipedia.org)
  • inflammation
  • The pull along the heel area sets up an inflammation process that calls inflammatory cells to the area, hence putting pressure on the local 'nerves'- creating the heel pain. (drblakeshealingsole.com)
  • Inflammation from the middle ear can spread to the canalis facialis of the temporal bone - through this canal travels the facial nerve together with the steatoacoustisus nerve. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the case of inflammation the nerve is exposed to edema and subsequent high pressure, resulting in a periferic type palsy. (wikipedia.org)
  • trauma
  • Physical trauma, especially fractures of the temporal bone, may also cause acute facial nerve paralysis. (wikipedia.org)
  • symptoms
  • Facial nerve paralysis is characterised by unilateral facial weakness, with other symptoms including loss of taste, hyperacusis, and decreased salivation and tear secretion. (wikipedia.org)
  • result
  • The pathway of the facial nerve is long and relatively convoluted, and so there are a number of causes that may result in facial nerve paralysis. (wikipedia.org)
  • A tumor compressing the facial nerve anywhere along its complex pathway can result in facial paralysis. (wikipedia.org)
  • long
  • It is also easy to visualize this nerve longitudinally (long axis). (usra.ca)
  • The PNS consists mainly of nerves, which are long fibers that connect the CNS to every other part of the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • Region
  • Often, since facial neoplasms have such an intimate relationship with the facial nerve, removing tumors in this region becomes perplexing as the physician is unsure how to manage the tumor without causing even more palsy. (wikipedia.org)
  • side
  • Superficial branch of radial nerve (innervating forearm and hand on the thumb side) Human locomotion is often examined from the perspective of the gait cycle. (wikipedia.org)
  • cause
  • Reactivation of herpes zoster virus, as well as being associated with Bell's palsy, may also be a direct cause of facial nerve palsy. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • Microglia Astrocyte Oligodendrocyte (CNS) vs Schwann cell (PNS) A neuron (also known as a neurone or nerve cell) is an excitable cell in the nervous system that processes and transmits information by electrochemical signaling. (wikipedia.org)