• GaAs
  • The metal organic precursors were di-tert-butyl gallium dithiocarbamates, for example GatBu2(S2CNMe2) and this was deposited onto GaAs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ternary
  • Ternary sulfides MIGaS2, MIIGa2S4 and MIIIGaS3 respectively have been of interest due to their unusual electrical properties and some of these can be prepared by reactions of Ga2S3 with metal sulfides e.g. (wikipedia.org)
  • tetrahedral
  • This anion links the gallium atom such that its tetrahedral environment is not altered, but what was a tricoordinated S atom now becomes a dicoordinated bridging atom. (wikipedia.org)
  • The crystal structures are related to those of ZnS with gallium in tetrahedral positions. (wikipedia.org)
  • phosphorus
  • As per black phosphorus, tin(II) sulfide can be ultrasonically exfoliated in liquids to produce atomically thin semiconducting SnS sheets that have a wider optical band gap (>1.5 eV) compared to the bulk crystal. (wikipedia.org)
  • anion
  • Ga2S3 dissolves in aqueous solutions of potassium sulfide, K2S to form K8Ga4S10 containing the (Ga4S10)8− anion which has an adamantane, molecular P4O10 structure. (wikipedia.org)
  • reaction
  • The method of production can determine the polymorphic form produced, the reaction of Ga(OH)3 with H2S at different temperatures is reported to produce a different polymorph depending on the temperature, α- 1020 K, β- 820 K and γ- above 873 K Ga2S3 disproportionates at high temperature forming the non-stoichiometric sulfide, Ga4Sx (4.8 (wikipedia.org)
  • copper
  • It is manufactured by depositing a thin layer of copper, indium, gallium and selenide on glass or plastic backing, along with electrodes on the front and back to collect current. (wikipedia.org)
  • The material is a solid solution of copper indium selenide (often abbreviated "CIS") and copper gallium selenide, with a chemical formula of CuInxGa(1-x)Se2, where the value of x can vary from 1 (pure copper indium selenide) to 0 (pure copper gallium selenide). (wikipedia.org)
  • The bandgap varies continuously with x from about 1.0 eV (for copper indium selenide) to about 1.7 eV (for copper gallium selenide). (wikipedia.org)
  • Elemental
  • Elemental gallium is a soft, silvery blue metal at standard temperature and pressure, a brittle solid at low temperatures, and a liquid at temperatures greater than 29.76 °C (85.57 °F) (above room temperature, but below the normal human body temperature). (wikipedia.org)
  • Elemental gallium is not found in nature, but it is easily obtained by smelting. (wikipedia.org)
  • glass
  • The glass forming ability of gallium(III) sulfide and lanthanum sulfide was discovered in 1976 by Loireau-Lozac'h, Guittard, and Flahut. (wikipedia.org)
  • however, with sodium or lanthanum sulphides it forms a glass, gallium lanthanum sulphide (GLS). (wikipedia.org)
  • Very pure gallium metal has a silvery color and its solid metal fractures conchoidally like glass. (wikipedia.org)
  • therefore, it should not be stored in glass or metal containers because the container may rupture when the gallium changes state. (wikipedia.org)
  • Of the four, gallium is the only one that is neither highly reactive (rubidium and caesium) nor highly toxic (mercury) and can therefore be used in metal-in-glass high-temperature thermometers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Unlike mercury, liquid gallium metal wets glass and skin, along with most other materials (with the exceptions of quartz, graphite, and Teflon), making it mechanically more difficult to handle even though it is substantially less toxic and requires far fewer precautions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gallium painted onto glass is a brilliant mirror. (wikipedia.org)
  • bismuth
  • Gallium shares the higher-density liquid state with a short list of other materials that includes water, silicon, germanium, antimony, bismuth, and plutonium. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chemical
  • Used as chemical reagent and catalyst when polymerization of hydrocarbon.tin sulphide also used in electronic manufacturing industry, abrasive material and so on. (rboschco.com)
  • The buffer is typically cadmium sulfide (CdS) deposited via chemical bath deposition. (wikipedia.org)
  • temperature
  • The melting point of gallium is used as a temperature reference point. (wikipedia.org)
  • The melting point of gallium, at 302.9146 K (29.7646 °C, 85.5763 °F), is just above room temperature, and is approximately the same as the average summer daytime temperatures in Earth's mid-latitudes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gallium is one of the four non-radioactive metals (with caesium, rubidium, and mercury) that are known to be liquid at, or near, normal room temperature. (wikipedia.org)
  • absorber
  • Based on the a detailed balance calculation using the material bandgap, the power conversion efficiency of a solar cell utilizing a tin(II) sulfide absorber layer could be as high as 32%, which is comparable to crystalline silicon. (wikipedia.org)
  • All aforementioned characteristics suggest tin(II) sulfide as an interesting material to be used as a solar cell absorber layer. (wikipedia.org)
  • mercury
  • Gallium alloys are used in thermometers as a non-toxic and environmentally friendly alternative to mercury, and can withstand higher temperatures than mercury. (wikipedia.org)
  • properties
  • Barriers for use include a low open circuit voltage and an inability to realize many of the above properties due to challenges in fabrication, but tin(II) sulfide still remains a promising material if these technical challenges are overcome. (wikipedia.org)
  • elements
  • The normal form of gallium(II) sulfide as made from the elements has a hexagonal layer structure containing Ga24+ units which have a Ga-Ga distance of 248pm. (wikipedia.org)
  • applications
  • Gallium(III) behaves in a similar manner to ferric salts in biological systems, and has been used in some medical applications, including pharmaceuticals and radiopharmaceuticals. (wikipedia.org)