• HFCS
  • The latter found in high amounts in added sugars such as sucrose and high fructose corn syrup (HFCS). (mdpi.com)
  • Teff offers the following: 1) this study does not provide evidence that HFCS is more likely to lead to obesity than sucrose, and 2) has no applicability to humans. (eatingwell.com)
  • The solutions of HFCS and sucrose used in all the studies-there were a few-in the Princeton report provided different levels of calories. (eatingwell.com)
  • In one of the studies, the authors reported that male rats had a higher body weight after being exposed to 12 hours of access to the HFCS plus their typical rat chow compared to 1) standard chow alone, 2) 12 hours of access to sucrose with chow, and 3) 24 hours of access to sucrose with chow. (eatingwell.com)
  • Finally, in a third study, they show body weight as a percent of baseline (this is appropriate) and show that rats who had free access to both chow and HFCS gained a tiny bit more weight than chow alone, 12 hours of HFCS or 12 hours of sucrose. (eatingwell.com)