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  • pods
  • Aphids start out in the upper canopy of the soybean and slowly move down the plant to lower leaves, stems, and pods. (lgseeds.com)
  • Later in the season the aphids can be found on all parts of the plant, feeding primarily on the undersides of leaves, but also on the stems and pods. (unl.edu)
  • The insect can also feed on the surface of soybean pods, leaving the seed vulnerable to excess moisture and secondary pathogens. (vt.edu)
  • leaf
  • Thrips feed by rupturing the cell walls of leaf cells and sucking the exudates. (vt.edu)
  • Bean leaf beetle is a common pest through all soybean production areas and has become more of a concern in the Midwest in recent years. (vt.edu)
  • It feeds by sucking plant sap, which can cause leaf curling and plant stunting and pod abortion. (vt.edu)
  • wings
  • Some aphids develop wings, which allow them to spread to other plants. (thebump.com)
  • Ants, however, exploit aphids by preventing them from leaving the colony by chewing off their wings or emitting a chemical that prevents young aphids from developing wings. (thebump.com)
  • cornicles
  • At the rear of the body, an aphid has two additional projections called cornicles. (thebump.com)
  • Most aphids have a pair of cornicles (or "siphunculi"), abdominal tubes through which they exude droplets of a quick-hardening defensive fluid containing triacylglycerols, called cornicle wax. (wikipedia.org)
  • insecticides
  • We only mention this pest here because some companies are promoting early-season control of aphid with soil insecticides. (vt.edu)
  • Although soil insecticides may provide some control to seedling soybeans, this is not an issue in Virginia. (vt.edu)
  • liquids
  • The mouthparts are variable, but usually function to sponge up liquids or they are needle-like and are used to pierce and suck-up liquids. (grovida.us)