• 1999
  • The AACN, along with nurse executives and nurse educators designed the Clinical Nurse Leader role (the first new role in nursing in 35 years) in response to the Institute of Medicine's (IOM) comprehensive report on medical errors, To Err is Human: Building a Safer Health System, released in November 1999. (wikipedia.org)
  • centers
  • Kaldjian and his colleagues received survey responses from 538 faculty physicians, resident physicians and medical students from academic medical centers in the Midwest, Mid-Atlantic and Northeast regions of the United States. (emaxhealth.com)
  • Across the participating centers, the overall rate of medical errors decreased by 23 percent-from 24.5 to 18.8 errors per 100 admissions-after the introduction of I-PASS. (healthcanal.com)
  • By reviewing and correcting medical content in the manner promoted by Heilman (and with many of his contributions), in Wikipedia articles like that about Ebola, Wikipedia has become a source of information to the general public, thus being regarded among respected sites run by the World Health Organization and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, covering the topic. (wikipedia.org)
  • physicians
  • When it comes to disclosing medical errors to patients, there is a gap between physicians' attitudes and their real-world experiences admitting such errors. (emaxhealth.com)
  • From a survey of faculty physicians, resident physicians and medical students, researchers found that while nearly all respondents indicated that they would disclose a hypothetical error, less than half reported having disclosed an actual minor or major medical error. (emaxhealth.com)
  • We were interested in what factors or beliefs might be motivating physicians who are more likely to disclose errors to their patients. (emaxhealth.com)
  • Ninety-seven percent of the faculty and resident physicians indicated that they would disclose the hypothetical medical error that resulted in minor medical harm (resulting in prolonged treatment or discomfort) to a patient, and 93 percent responded that they would disclose the error if it caused major harm (disability or death) to a patient. (emaxhealth.com)
  • However, only 41 percent of faculty and resident physicians reported actually having disclosed a minor medical error, and only 5 percent responded as having disclosed a major error. (emaxhealth.com)
  • Taken at face value, the responses would imply that more than half of the physicians surveyed have never made a medical error in their careers. (emaxhealth.com)
  • The point remains, however, that there appears to be a discrepancy between how physicians and trainees believe they would act when faced with a medical error situation and how they have acted when in these situations, he said. (emaxhealth.com)
  • Fear of malpractice has been cited as a reason why doctors do not disclose medical errors, but the study authors report that their survey found that physicians who had been exposed to malpractice litigation were not less inclined to disclose errors. (emaxhealth.com)
  • Physicians with more experience were more willing to disclose medical errors, suggesting that with increased clinical competence and confidence, doctors become more comfortable with error disclosure, according to the study. (emaxhealth.com)
  • Kaldjian also noted preliminary survey data showing that physicians who indicated that forgiveness is an important part of their spiritual and religious belief systems were more likely to disclose medical errors to their patients. (emaxhealth.com)
  • Just as important, they can ensure that their clients consult with capable, independent physicians and specialists to assess the long-term medical implications of the harm they suffered. (sgklawyers.com)
  • In May, 2016, the British Medical Journal raised serious concerns among patients and physicians when it published a study that found that medical errors are the third leading cause of death in the United States. (ask4sam.net)
  • During a hospital stay tests are ordered by emergency department physicians, generalists, specialists, hospitalists and other medical staff. (innovations-report.com)
  • Medical education, from the first year of medical school through the end of residency training, requires learners to assume graded responsibility and autonomy in clinical practice while the trainees engender trust in their attending physicians (8) . (annals.org)
  • Patients and physicians have suspected this, but individual studies often offered inconclusive findings. (annals.org)
  • Differential diagnostic procedures are used by physicians and other trained medical professionals to diagnose the specific disease in a patient, or, at least, to eliminate any imminently life-threatening conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • As illustrated in Columbia Medical Center of Las Colinas v Bush, 122 S.W. 3d 835 (Tex. 2003), "following orders" may not protect nurses and other non-physicians from liability when committing negligent acts. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although anesthesiologists comprise only about 5% of physicians in the United States, anesthesiology became the leading medical specialty addressing issues of patient safety. (wikipedia.org)
  • Play media Since the beginning of his activity as a contributor to medicine-related Wikipedia articles in 2008, Heilman has been promoting the improvement of medical content by encouraging fellow physicians to take part. (wikipedia.org)
  • Emergency physicians generally practice in hospital emergency departments, pre-hospital settings via emergency medical services, and intensive care units, but may also work in primary care settings such as urgent care clinics. (wikipedia.org)
  • In countries following the Anglo-American model, emergency medicine was originally the domain of surgeons, general practitioners, and other generalist physicians, but in recent decades it has become recognised as a speciality in its own right with its own training programmes and academic posts, and the specialty is now a popular choice among medical students and newly qualified medical practitioners. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2000
  • For the study, they examined the findings of four prior studies that analyzed the medical death rate between 2000 and 2008. (reichandbinstock.com)
  • In 2000 alone, the extra medical costs incurred by preventable drug-related injuries approximated $887 million-and the study looked only at injuries sustained by Medicare recipients, a subset of clinic visitors. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another study notes that about 1.14 million patient-safety incidents occurred among the 37 million hospitalizations in the Medicare population over the years 2000-2002. (wikipedia.org)
  • He graduated from the University of Saskatchewan in 2000 with a Bachelor of Science in anatomy, and he subsequently earned his medical degree there in 2003. (wikipedia.org)
  • In November 2000, Senator Sinclair completed the "Report of the Pediatric Cardiac Surgery Inquest," a study into the deaths of twelve children in the pediatric cardiac surgery program of the HSC (Winnipeg Health Sciences Centre) in 1994. (wikipedia.org)
  • patients
  • Harm to patients as a result of alleged medical errors ranged from emotional injury to death. (oginski-law.com)
  • New procedures instituted in July to prevent surgical errors include double-checking patients' identities and using standardized procedures for marking patients' bodies in preparation for surgery. (ahcmedia.com)
  • Patients expect that these medical professionals will use that specialized training to ensure that they do not feel any pain during an operation, and that they will wake up from surgery better than they were before the procedure. (biklaw.com)
  • A recent study of a major American university health care system has revealed that disclosure of errors to patients does not increase liability costs. (sgklawyers.com)
  • The project's goals are twofold: to improve safety for patients, but also to reduce medical malpractice liability costs. (sgklawyers.com)
  • Four patients in an intensive-care unit at University of Maryland Medical Center have been isolated after lab tests showed that they have a relatively uncommon bacterial infection that is resistant to antibiotics. (baltimoresun.com)
  • The isolated patients at the hospital have a treatment team assigned to them, members of which wear gowns and gloves, and the hospital has minimized risks that the infection might spread to its nine other intensive-care units, said Dr. Harold Standiford, medical director of infection control. (baltimoresun.com)
  • Insurance companies, legislators and medical professionals have suggested a variety of potential solutions to the alarming rate of medical errors in America - from treating more patients at home to establishing harsher penalties for doctors who commit dangerous errors. (ask4sam.net)
  • Despite unprecedented levels of spending, preventable medical errors abound, uncoordinated care still frustrates patients and providers, and health care costs continue to rise (4) . (annals.org)
  • Wether or not that is what's best for patients is beyond me, although I believe there have been studies showing that there are a lot of medical errors associated with the constant trading off of patients from resident to resident once their shifts are over. (studentdoctor.net)
  • The word error in medicine is used as a label for nearly all of the problems harming patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Medical errors affect one in 10 patients worldwide. (wikipedia.org)
  • A 2009 study published in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons found no month-by-month differences in outcomes of medical trauma patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • A 2009 study published in the Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases found no evidence of the July effect for patients with acute ischemic stroke. (wikipedia.org)
  • A 2009 study published in the Southern Medical Journal found no difference in the medical management of patients with acute cardiovascular conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • A 2008 study published in The American Journal of Surgery found no seasonal difference in outcomes for cardiac surgery patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • in JAMA Surgery found no evidence of the July effect in patient-experience outcomes in surgical patients.http://archsurg.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2526244 In Britain, there is an influx of newly qualified doctors into the National Health Service (NHS) each August, and this period is associated with an increase in medical errors. (wikipedia.org)
  • The study also found that typically fewer patients attended A&E on the first Wednesday in August than the previous week. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patients in that study might also die during that 10-minute period. (wikipedia.org)
  • If the researcher feels there is an imminent danger posed by the device, he or she can use medical discretion to stop patients from participating in the study. (wikipedia.org)
  • Emergency medicine, also known as accident and emergency medicine, is the medical specialty concerned with caring for undifferentiated, unscheduled patients with illnesses or injuries requiring immediate medical attention. (wikipedia.org)
  • Emergency Medicine is a medical specialty-a field of practice based on the knowledge and skills required for the prevention, diagnosis and management of acute and urgent aspects of illness and injury affecting patients of all age groups with a full spectrum of undifferentiated physical and behavioral disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • America
  • In later life she studied for qualifications in America and Europe, including courses with the Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs and training as a disability equality facilitator with the International Labour Organization. (wikipedia.org)
  • found
  • In fact, a recent study found that such errors are a leading contributor to mortality in the U.S. (reichandbinstock.com)
  • Higher-quality studies have consistently found greater evidence of a true "July effect" throughout training. (annals.org)
  • A study released in 2016 found medical error is the third leading cause of death in the United States, after heart disease and cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2013, BMJ Open performed a study in which they found that "failure to diagnose" accounted for the largest portion of medical malpractice claims brought against health professionals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Furthermore, the study found that the most common result of this negligence was death of the patient. (wikipedia.org)
  • Studies in Nigeria have found around 47-53% of men and to 18-36% of women engage in extramarital sex. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other studies searching for the July effect have found variable evidence of an increased risk, with several studies finding no risk at all. (wikipedia.org)
  • A 2007 study published in the Annals of Surgery found a significant seasonal variation with surgical outcomes, with an increase in postsurgical morbidity and mortality associated with the beginning of the academic year. (wikipedia.org)
  • A 2006 Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics study found a small increase in the risks associated with cerebrospinal fluid shunt surgery in children during the months of July and August. (wikipedia.org)
  • An 2003 Obstetrics & Gynecology study found no July effect in obstetric procedures. (wikipedia.org)
  • Heilman also worked on a study with Microsoft which found that in the three countries where the Ebola outbreak had the largest impact, Wikipedia was the most popular source for information about the disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2015, Heilman and Andrew West published a study which found that the number of Wikipedia editors who focused on editing medical articles decreased by 40 percent from 2008 to 2013. (wikipedia.org)
  • He became interested in editing Wikipedia on a slow night shift, when he looked up the article on obesity and found that it contained many errors. (wikipedia.org)
  • patient
  • On the bright side, most adults also are confident that initiatives like the recently enacted hospital standards to help prevent surgical errors will prove to be effective in advancing patient safety. (ahcmedia.com)
  • This includes first and foremost an assessment of the compensation due the patient or surviving family members when a failure to adhere to medical standards leads to prolonged illness, a birth injury, additional surgeries or a person's untimely death. (sgklawyers.com)
  • Regardless of the road that a patient must ultimately travel in pursuit of fairness, medical malpractice law firms often provide a voice to clients on a contingent fee basis, alleviating a grieving family or suffering patient from advancing the cost of professional counsel and advocacy. (sgklawyers.com)
  • This method is essentially a process of elimination or at least a process of obtaining information that shrinks the "probabilities" of candidate conditions to negligible levels, by using evidence such as symptoms, patient history, and medical knowledge to adjust epistemic confidences in the mind of the diagnostician (or, for computerized or computer-assisted diagnosis, the software of the system). (wikipedia.org)
  • Failure to warn: a medical professional is alleged to have treated the patient without first warning the patient of known risks and obtaining the patient's informed consent to that course of treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dreyfus' work in e-Health has focussed on the patient information experience in the health system and the role of technology in error incident reporting in hospital settings. (wikipedia.org)
  • The resulting patient safety knowledge continually informs improvement efforts such as: applying lessons learned from business and industry, adopting innovative technologies, educating providers and consumers, enhancing error reporting systems, and developing new economic incentives. (wikipedia.org)
  • More than 160 000 adverse medical events per year have been suspected in the United States because of misidentification of patient or laboratory specimen. (wikipedia.org)
  • Barcodes have been noted to be the strong intervention to reduce labeling errors on specimen collection, by ensuring that the correct patient is receiving the correct analysis. (wikipedia.org)
  • An adverse event (AE) is any untoward medical occurrence in a patient or clinical investigation subject administered a pharmaceutical product and which does not necessarily have a causal relationship with this treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • An adverse event can also be declared in the normal treatment of a patient which is suspected of being caused by the medication being taken or a medical device used in the treatment of the patient. (wikipedia.org)
  • fatal
  • Some of these facility and doctor errors may go unnoticed, while others may lead to potentially fatal conditions. (reichandbinstock.com)
  • In an episode first broadcast on BBC1 on 5 May 1994, the character Dr. Claire Maitland consoles a junior who has just committed a fatal error with the dialogue: "You come out of medical school knowing bugger all. (wikipedia.org)
  • The 'July Effect': Worst Month For Fatal Hospital Errors, Study Finds", ABC News, 3 June 2010 "Valley Dr.: Surgery's `July effect' outdated", KTAR, 17 June 2010 Yaghoubian A, de Virgilio C, Chiu V, Lee SL (2010). (wikipedia.org)
  • clinical
  • 1994 Vimla Patel's Homepage Journal Articles Book Chapters Medline Publications Google Scholar Citations Elstein, A.S., Shulman, L.S., and Sprafka, S.A. Medical Problem-Solving: An Analysis of Clinical Reasoning. (wikipedia.org)
  • physician
  • If no diagnosis remains, it means either that the physician made an error, or that the condition is undocumented. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although a 'health care provider' usually refers to a physician, the term includes any medical care provider, including dentists, nurses, and therapists. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hand Hygiene
  • Hand Hygiene: A Handbook for Medical Professionals is an about-to-be-released book on how to properly hand infection control in a variety of circumstances. (taproot.com)
  • Analyses
  • These results, together with other detailed analyses about the production and consumption of medical content on Wikipedia, were published by the Journal of Medical Internet Research in 2015. (wikipedia.org)
  • Health
  • National funding is informed from our national health statistics, but those statistics don't recognize medical care gone awry as a cause of death. (valuesbasedpa.com)
  • Medical mishaps are not listed on death certificates and are not part of national health statistics so they don't get national funding. (valuesbasedpa.com)
  • The study, published in the August 17, 2010, issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine , considered 12 years of data from the University of Michigan Health System. (sgklawyers.com)
  • Her past work in health cognition includes studies of risk-taking behavior and sexual decision making as it pertains to HIV in youth and adolescents. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the United States, the full magnitude and impact of errors in health care was not appreciated until the 1990s, when several reports brought attention to this issue. (wikipedia.org)
  • year
  • Johns Hopkins Medicine did this study, and was conducted over an 8-year period. (valuesbasedpa.com)
  • having won the A.J. Christie Prize awarded to the top student in litigation, in his second year of legal studies. (wikipedia.org)
  • disclosure
  • But an atmosphere of disclosure also allows for a more prompt resolution of the legal aspects of medical malpractice. (sgklawyers.com)
  • One potential shortcoming of medical disclosure initiatives that are the brainchild of hospital administrators is that they also target their organization's bottom line. (sgklawyers.com)
  • treatment
  • Negligent treatment: a medical professional is alleged to have made a mistake that a reasonably competent professional in the same position would not have made. (wikipedia.org)
  • This process allows the sponsor and all the local investigators access to a set of data that might suggest potential problems with the study treatment while the study is still ongoing. (wikipedia.org)