• diseases
  • Smallpox is one of the deadliest diseases in history, killing about 30 to 40 percent of its victims and has killed more than 300 million people worldwide in the 20th century alone. (tbrnews.org)
  • One of the most feared diseases of human history, smallpox was still causing an estimated 2 million deaths every year as late as 1967. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1977
  • On 12 October 1977, two children with smallpox symptoms were discovered at an encampment near the small inland settlement of Kurtunawarey, around 90 km from Merca. (wikipedia.org)
  • epidemic
  • The 1837 Great Plains smallpox epidemic spanned 1836 through 1840, but reached its height after the spring of 1837 when an American Fur Company steamboat, the S.S. St. Peter, carried infected people and supplies into the Missouri Valley. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Mandan tribe, also called the People of the Pheasants, had previously experienced a major smallpox epidemic in 1780-81 which severely reduced their numbers down to less than a few thousand. (wikipedia.org)
  • Maalin
  • Ali Maow Maalin (also Mao Moallim and Mao' Mo'allim) (1954 - 22 July 2013) was a Somali hospital cook and health worker from Merca who is the last person known to be infected with naturally occurring Variola minor smallpox in the world. (wikipedia.org)
  • Merca Maalin worked as a cook at the hospital in the port-town of Merca in southern Somalia, as well as an occasional vaccinator for a WHO smallpox eradication team. (wikipedia.org)
  • pathogens
  • In an attempt to develop a warning system for a bioterror attack, the Environmental Protection Agency's air quality monitoring system was adapted (2003) to permit detection of an outdoor release of smallpox and other pathogens. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • biological
  • Smallpox was used as a biological weapon several times during the colonization of the Americas. (encyclopedia.com)
  • During World War I , Germany developed a biological warfare program based on the bacterium Bacillus anthracis and a strain of Pseudomonas known as Burkholderia mallei , which causes glanders disease in cattle. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Even the smallpox story, it turns out, testifies to a decidedly unsocialist fact: we can't defend ourselves against biological attacks without the private capital and expertise of a thriving, nimble, endlessly innovative civilian drug industry. (city-journal.org)
  • disease
  • By going deeper, we may reactivate the possibility that smallpox could become again a disease of humans in modern times. (nhpr.org)
  • In the late eighteenth century, Edward Jenner discovered that exposing a healthy person to cowpox, a relatively minor disease closely related to smallpox, by means of a cut in the arm, tended to make this "vaccinated" person resistant to smallpox. (newchurchhistory.org)
  • Smallpox is broadly classified into major smallpox (variola major) and minor smallpox (variola minor), reflecting clinical features and disease severity, with subcategories in each. (psychiatryadvisor.com)
  • The nomadic people of the Ogaden Desert retained endemic smallpox with an unusually mild form of the disease, which facilitated persistence in the population. (wikipedia.org)
  • The incident caused ten individuals to contract smallpox and three unvaccinated individuals (a woman and two children) died from the haemorrhagic form of the disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • A massive public health response to the smallpox cases in Aral ensued once the disease was recognized. (wikipedia.org)
  • As observed by academic researchers in 1945, "Smallpox killed more Indians in the early centuries than did any other single disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Like all smallpox victims, he was at serious risk of dying, but he survived the disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • This article discusses smallpox as it existed in Mozart's time, the decision taken in 1764 by Mozart's father Leopold not to inoculate his children against the disease, the course of Mozart's illness, and the aftermath. (wikipedia.org)
  • Smallpox in 18th-century Europe was a devastating disease, recurring in frequent epidemics and killing or disfiguring millions of people. (wikipedia.org)
  • viruses
  • If it is true that these viruses survive in the same way those amoeba viruses survive, then smallpox is not eradicated from the planet - only [from] the surface," Claverie says. (nhpr.org)
  • indigenous
  • There have been many documented cases of smallpox being intentionally spread among the indigenous people of the Americas by colonizers. (wikipedia.org)
  • thus
  • Thus, many parents felt that they would rather do nothing, risking future smallpox arriving at random, rather than carry out a deliberate act that might well kill their children immediately. (wikipedia.org)
  • time
  • I called [future Soviet General Secretary Yuri] Andropov, who at that time was Chief of KGB, and informed him of the exclusive recipe of smallpox obtained on Vozrazhdenie Island. (wikipedia.org)
  • world
  • There, in the frame of three-year-old Rahima Banu, the World Health Organization finally cornered smallpox, the most dreadful killer on the planet. (city-journal.org)
  • Smallpox was declared to have been eradicated globally by the World Health Organization (WHO) two years later. (wikipedia.org)
  • This endeavour was carried out by the World Health Organization under the Smallpox Eradication Program. (wikipedia.org)
  • program
  • Burgasov, former Chief Sanitary Physician of the Soviet Army, former Soviet Vice-Minister of Health and a senior researcher within the Soviet BW program, described the incident: On Vozrozhdeniya Island in the Aral Sea, the strongest recipes of smallpox were tested. (wikipedia.org)
  • children
  • Five adults ranging in age from 23 to 60, and three children (4 and 9 months old, and a 5-year-old) were diagnosed with smallpox both clinically and by laboratory testing. (wikipedia.org)
  • The two youngest children and the 23-year-old subsequently developed the haemorrhagic form of smallpox and died. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Mozarts were renting rooms in the home of the goldsmith Johann Schmalecker, and were horrified when all three of Schmalecker's children came down with smallpox. (wikipedia.org)
  • early
  • In November 1763, while six months pregnant, Isabella fell ill with smallpox and went into premature labor, resulting in the birth of their second child, Archduchess Maria Christina, who, having come too early, died shortly after being born. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, during the late 1630s, smallpox killed over half of the Wyandot (Huron), who controlled most of the early North American fur trade in what became Canada. (wikipedia.org)