• outbreak
  • As an outbreak of smallpox would certainly not be confined to that country, frantic searches have been, and are being, conducted to locate the thieves and prevent a world-wide epidemic that could kill off half the world's population. (tbrnews.org)
  • But it is actually quite difficult to calculate the damage a smallpox outbreak would cause--especially if the disease were seeded in many locations at once, the most dangerous scenario. (prospect.org)
  • The Aral smallpox incident was a July 30, 1971 outbreak of the viral disease which occurred as a result of a field test at a Soviet biological weapons (BW) facility on an island in the Aral Sea. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to Soviet General Pyotr Burgasov (Peter Burgasov), field testing of 400 grams of smallpox at Aralsk-7 caused an outbreak on 30 July 1971. (wikipedia.org)
  • The high ratio of haemorrhagic smallpox cases in this outbreak, combined with the rate of infectivity and the testimony of General Burgasov, has led to the understanding that an enhanced weaponized strain of smallpox virus was released from Aralsk-7 in 1971. (wikipedia.org)
  • The 1978 smallpox outbreak in the United Kingdom claimed the life of Janet Parker (1938-1978), a British medical photographer, who became the last recorded person to die from smallpox. (wikipedia.org)
  • A similar outbreak had occurred at the University of Birmingham Medical School in 1966, when Tony McLennan, who was also a medical photographer and worked in the same laboratory later used by Parker, contracted smallpox. (wikipedia.org)
  • virulent smallpox
  • A single scab of highly virulent smallpox could be the size of a small pill and be more than enough to wipe out any major city. (slashdot.org)
  • Administration officials said the C.I.A. was still trying to determine whether Dr. Maltseva traveled to Iraq in 1990, and whether she shared a sample of what might be a particularly virulent smallpox strain with Iraqi scientists. (freerepublic.com)
  • Last June, experts from the Monterey Institute of International Studies, drawing on those Kazakh records and interviews with survivors, published a report saying the epidemic was a result of open-air tests of a particularly virulent smallpox strain on Vozrozhdeniye Island in the Aral Sea. (freerepublic.com)
  • World Health Organ
  • World Health Organization records in Geneva and interviews with scientists who worked with her confirmed that Dr. Maltseva visited Iraq at least twice, in 1972 and 1973, as part of the global campaign to eradicate smallpox. (freerepublic.com)
  • There, in the frame of three-year-old Rahima Banu, the World Health Organization finally cornered smallpox, the most dreadful killer on the planet. (city-journal.org)
  • Smallpox was declared to have been eradicated globally by the World Health Organization (WHO) two years later. (wikipedia.org)
  • lethal
  • More broadly, the Russian government's refusal to share smallpox and other lethal germ strains for study by the United States, or to answer questions about the fate of such strains, has reinforced American concerns about whether Russia has abandoned what was once the world's most ambitious covert germ weapons program. (freerepublic.com)
  • Alibek, former first deputy director of the Soviet bioweapons program, Russian scientists weaponized India-67, an extremely lethal smallpox strain, years ago. (prospect.org)
  • Smallpox, which is the most lethal and devastating viral infection in history, first emerged among agricultural communities in India about 11,000 years ago. (wikipedia.org)
  • virus
  • There have been very strong rumors, with some facts evident, that a splinter Muslim group has possession of stolen verola (smallpox) virus stolen from a German laboratory,that they have been planning to release in Israel. (tbrnews.org)
  • Most experts believe that the Iraqis also possess the virus--not least because Iraqi soldiers captured during the Gulf War showed evidence of having been recently vaccinated for smallpox, and this was 10 years after the disease was supposed to have disappeared from the earth. (prospect.org)
  • An especially virulent strain (codenamed India-1967 or India-1) was brought from India in 1967 by a special Soviet medical team that was sent to India to help eradicate the virus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Smallpox virus preferentially attacks skin cells, causing the characteristic pimples (called macules) associated with the disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Alastrim, also known as variola minor, was the milder strain of the variola virus that caused smallpox. (wikipedia.org)
  • The government inquiry into Parker's death by R.A. Shooter found that while working at the University of Birmingham Medical School, she was accidentally exposed to a strain of smallpox virus that had been grown in a research laboratory on the floor below her workplace, and that the virus had most likely spread from that laboratory through ducting. (wikipedia.org)
  • At the time of Parker's death, the laboratory at University of Birmingham Medical School was conducting research on variants of smallpox virus known as "whitepox viruses", which were considered to be a threat to the success of the World Health Organisation's smallpox eradication programme. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1977
  • On 12 October 1977, two children with smallpox symptoms were discovered at an encampment near the small inland settlement of Kurtunawarey, around 90 km from Merca. (wikipedia.org)
  • epidemic
  • Formerly secret Soviet records also show that in 1971, she was part of a covert mission to Aralsk, a port city in what was then the Soviet republic of Kazakhstan, north of the Aral Sea, to help stop an epidemic of smallpox. (freerepublic.com)
  • 1967
  • One of the most feared diseases of human history, smallpox was still causing an estimated 2 million deaths every year as late as 1967. (wikipedia.org)
  • diseases
  • Smallpox is one of the deadliest diseases in history, killing about 30 to 40 percent of its victims and has killed more than 300 million people worldwide in the 20th century alone. (tbrnews.org)
  • Smallpox is one of two infectious diseases to have been eradicated, the other being rinderpest in 2011. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is important to note that all of the classical and modern biological weapons organisms are animal diseases, the only exception being smallpox. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diseases associated with this family include smallpox. (wikipedia.org)
  • vaccines
  • The institute where she worked housed what Russia said was its entire national collection of 120 strains of smallpox, and some experts fear that she may have provided the Iraqis with a version that could be resistant to vaccines and could be more easily transmitted as a biological weapon. (freerepublic.com)
  • Because if there are strains that present a unique problem with respect to vaccines and treatment, it is in the interests of all freedom-loving people to have as much information as possible. (freerepublic.com)
  • viruses
  • If it is true that these viruses survive in the same way those amoeba viruses survive, then smallpox is not eradicated from the planet - only [from] the surface," Claverie says. (nhpr.org)
  • Parker often worked in a darkroom above a laboratory where research on smallpox viruses was being conducted. (wikipedia.org)
  • disease
  • The possibility that Iraq possesses this strain is one of several factors that has complicated Mr. Bush's decision, expected this week, about how many Americans should be vaccinated against smallpox, a disease that was officially eradicated in 1980. (freerepublic.com)
  • By going deeper, we may reactivate the possibility that smallpox could become again a disease of humans in modern times. (nhpr.org)
  • The nomadic people of the Ogaden Desert retained endemic smallpox with an unusually mild form of the disease, which facilitated persistence in the population. (wikipedia.org)
  • The incident caused ten individuals to contract smallpox and three unvaccinated individuals (a woman and two children) died from the haemorrhagic form of the disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • A massive public health response to the smallpox cases in Aral ensued once the disease was recognized. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because alastrim was a less debilitating disease than smallpox, patients were more frequently ambulant and thus able to infect others more rapidly. (wikipedia.org)
  • Attacks
  • Even the smallpox story, it turns out, testifies to a decidedly unsocialist fact: we can't defend ourselves against biological attacks without the private capital and expertise of a thriving, nimble, endlessly innovative civilian drug industry. (city-journal.org)
  • viral
  • Serguei Popov: A gene responsible for hemorrhage formation was included in one viral strain and diphtheria toxin gene in another bacterial strain. (biology-online.org)
  • The officials said several American scientists were told in August that Iraq might have obtained the mysterious strain from Nelja N. Maltseva, a virologist who worked for more than 30 years at the Research Institute for Viral Preparations in Moscow before her death two years ago. (freerepublic.com)
  • laboratory
  • Five adults ranging in age from 23 to 60, and three children (4 and 9 months old, and a 5-year-old) were diagnosed with smallpox both clinically and by laboratory testing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pregnant
  • In November 1763, while six months pregnant, Isabella fell ill with smallpox and went into premature labor, resulting in the birth of their second child, Archduchess Maria Christina, who, having come too early, died shortly after being born. (wikipedia.org)
  • form
  • The two youngest children and the 23-year-old subsequently developed the haemorrhagic form of smallpox and died. (wikipedia.org)
  • person
  • The common claim is that a smallpox attack, if it were to happen, would kill about one infected person in three. (prospect.org)