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  • risk
  • Additionally, drug-eluting stents don't increase the risk of death, and they're more likely to prevent narrowing of the arteries than bare-metal stents. (lww.com)
  • strong
  • The results, write the authors, "provide strong evidence of the beneficial effects" of drug-eluting stents compared with bare-metal stents. (lww.com)

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  • post-stent
  • A number of other steps may or may not be performed, including the use of a cerebral protection device, pre- or post-stent balloon dilation and cerebral angiography. (wikipedia.org)
  • carotid artery
  • Doctors also may use stents to treat carotid artery disease . (nih.gov)
  • Researchers continue to explore the risks and benefits of carotid artery stenting. (nih.gov)
  • An interim report from ICSS demonstrates no overall difference between surgery and stenting for both major strokes and death, but again did show more minor strokes (resolved within 30 days) with stents and open surgery was safer than CAS in the treatment of symptomatic carotid artery disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • cardiac
  • A team in Peter Munk Cardiac Centre's cardiac catheterization lab inserted the stent as they repaired the narrow artery of a patient with angina. (uhn.ca)
  • Although there is no specific cardiac stent diet, people who have had a cardiac stent and been diagnosed with heart disease should. (livestrong.com)
  • This produced the bombshell finding that patients with coated stents had double the risk of cardiac problems after stopping Plavix than those with plain metal stents. (dailystrength.org)
  • A cardiac angiography will follow to ensure that the stent is keeping the artery open. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Early and late major adverse cardiac events, revascularizations, and scaffold thromboses have been uncommon and similar to the Xience DES, a market leader in the drug eluting stent category. (wikipedia.org)
  • restenosis
  • By forming a rigid support, the stent can prevent the vessel from reclosing (a process called restenosis) and reduce the need for coronary bypass surgery. (encyclopedia.com)
  • These coated stents have significantly reduced restenosis rates - down to 3% - in some clinical studies. (encyclopedia.com)
  • by releasing an antiproliferative drug (drugs typically used against cancer or as immunosuppressants), they can help avoid this in-stent restenosis (re-narrowing). (wikipedia.org)
  • bladder
  • Drugs used for the treatment of OAB (over active bladder) are sometimes given to reduce or eliminate the increased urgency and frequency of urination caused by the presence of the stent. (wikipedia.org)
  • The stent inserted has a small rare earth magnet attached to its bladder end which dangles freely within the bladder. (wikipedia.org)
  • A temporary stent will not provide voiding function if the patient does not have a working bladder and external sphincter. (wikipedia.org)
  • scaffold
  • Researchers want to learn more about this stent so that they can better understand which patients might benefit most from having this kind of a scaffold inserted. (uhn.ca)
  • A stent is a small wire mesh tube used to open and support a narrowed artery, much like a scaffold. (orlandohealth.com)
  • The main purpose of a stent is to counteract significant decreases in vessel or duct diameter by acutely propping open the conduit by a mechanical scaffold or stent. (yahoo.com)
  • bioabsorbable
  • The stent used is the only bioabsorbable stent available for clinical use right now and is currently only available by special access from Health Canada. (uhn.ca)
  • Bioabsorbable scaffolds, or naturally dissolving stents, that have been investigated include base materials that are either metals or polymers. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is much short of the three-to-six month window desired for bioabsorbable stents. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1947
  • Born in London in 1947, Stent attended Cambridge University, where she received her B.A. in economics and modern history. (wikipedia.org)
  • resorbable
  • Substantial improvements have been made, including the use of more biocompatible materials, anti-inflammatory drug-eluting stents, resorbable stents, and others. (wikipedia.org)
  • Clinical research has shown that resorbable scaffolds, or naturally dissolving stents, offer comparable efficacy and safety profile to drug-eluting stents. (wikipedia.org)
  • Calidris
  • A stint is one of several very small waders in the paraphyletic "Calidris" assemblage - often separated in Erolia - which in North America are known as peeps. (wikipedia.org)
  • blood clots
  • Doctors think these stents may raise the risk of life-threatening blood clots months and even years later unless people stay on Plavix, an anti-clotting drug whose long-term safety in stent patients has not been established. (dailystrength.org)
  • Aspirin can help decrease the possibility of blood clots forming at the stent. (encyclopedia.com)
  • 1856
  • In 1856, Stent added several other materials to the gutta-percha, notably stearine, which markedly improved the plasticity of the material as well as its stability. (wikipedia.org)
  • interventional
  • This new stent may turn out to be better for patients because there's no metal,' says Dr. Vlad Dzavik, deputy head, Division of Cardiology and Director of Interventional Cardiology Research, University Health Network. (uhn.ca)
  • alleviate
  • Stents are often used to alleviate diminished blood flow to organs and extremities beyond an obstruction in order to maintain an adequate delivery of oxygenated blood. (yahoo.com)
  • The artery-opening stent can temporarily alleviate chest pain, but does not contribute to longevity. (wikipedia.org)
  • In medicine, a stent is any device which is inserted into a blood vessel or other internal duct in order to expand the vessel to prevent or alleviate a blockage. (wikipedia.org)
  • vessel
  • It is critically important that the framework of the stent be in direct contact with the walls of the vessel to minimize potential complications such as blood clot formation. (wikipedia.org)
  • urine
  • A ureteral stent, sometimes as well called ureteric stent, is a thin tube inserted into the ureter to prevent or treat obstruction of the urine flow from the kidney. (wikipedia.org)
  • In many cases these tumors are inoperable and the stents are used to ensure drainage of urine through the ureter. (wikipedia.org)
  • A prostatic stent is a stent used to keep open the male urethra and allow the passing of urine in cases of prostatic obstruction and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). (wikipedia.org)
  • The Spanner temporary prostatic stent maintains urine flow and allows natural voluntary urination. (wikipedia.org)
  • The temporary prostatic stent is typically used to help patients maintain urine flow after procedures that cause prostatic swelling, such as brachytherapy, cryotherapy, TUMT, TURP. (wikipedia.org)
  • metallic
  • FDA public health notification: complications from metallic tracheal stents in patients with benign airway disorders, 2005 www.fda.gov/cdrh/safety/072905-tracheal.html (Accessed on January 15, 2007). (uptodate.com)
  • Endoscopic stents are commonly referred to as self-expandable metallic stents (SEMS). (wikipedia.org)
  • blockage
  • The stent is usually a stainless steel mesh tube that is available in various sizes to match the size of the artery and hold it open after the blockage in the artery has been treated. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Common practice in the US is to predilate the blockage before delivering the stent. (wikipedia.org)
  • The main complications with ureteral stents are dislocation, infection and blockage by encrustation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Prosthesis
  • As Ariel Roguin describes in his paper "Stent: The Man and Word Behind the Coronary Metal Prosthesis", the current acceptable origin of the word stent is that it derives from the name of a dentist. (wikipedia.org)
  • chest pain
  • Former President Bill Clinton was taken to New York's Columbia-Presbyterian Hospital this afternoon with complaints of chest pain and subsequently received two stents, according to a statement from his office. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Stents reduce chest pain and have been shown to improve survivability in the event of an acute myocardial infarction. (wikipedia.org)
  • Metal
  • Traditional stents are made of metal, which can complicate bypass surgery if the patient needs that in the future. (uhn.ca)
  • Dr. Dzavik is quick to point out that this does not make metal stents obsolete. (uhn.ca)
  • Metal stents can save the life of a patient having a heart attack and can stop the angina of a patient with more chronic symptoms. (uhn.ca)
  • These gizmos, called drug-coated stents, worked so much better than plain old metal ones that 6 million people worldwide received them in the few years they have been available. (dailystrength.org)
  • Many are returning to the old metal stents, and some are fundamentally rethinking when to use stents at all and are considering alternatives like bypass surgery or medications. (dailystrength.org)
  • Stents usually are made of metal mesh, but sometimes they're made of fabric. (nih.gov)
  • The physician expands the balloon which deforms the metal stent to its expanded size. (wikipedia.org)
  • Metal stent candidates are iron, magnesium, zinc and their alloys. (wikipedia.org)
  • Permanent stents are often metal coils, which are inserted into the male urethra. (wikipedia.org)
  • temporary
  • These effects are generally temporary and disappear with the removal of the stent. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are two types of prostatic stent: temporary and permanent. (wikipedia.org)
  • At the present time, there is one temporary prostatic stent that has received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval. (wikipedia.org)
  • A novel temporary prostatic stent for the relief of prostatic urethral obstruction. (wikipedia.org)
  • CYPHER
  • Two brands are sold in the United States - Taxus, by Boston Scientific Corp., and Cypher, by Johnson & Johnson\'s Cordis Corp. Labels say patients should take baby aspirin and Plavix for three months with Cypher and six months with Taxus, based on how long the stents release medication and how long doctors believed it took for the artery to repair itself by forming a new lining. (dailystrength.org)
  • One coated stent brand, the Cordis CYPHER, became the first coated stent approved by the FDA in April 2003. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Cypher is a brand of drug-eluting coronary stent from Cordis Corporation, a Johnson & Johnson company. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Cypher stent was approved for use by the FDA in 2003. (wikipedia.org)
  • Following claims of inconsistent manufacturing processes and poor sales, Johnson & Johnson have announced that it will stop selling Cypher stents by the end of 2011. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1987
  • Shortly thereafter in 1987, Julio Palmaz (known for patenting a balloon-expandable stent) and Richard Schatz implanted their similar stent into a patient in Germany. (wikipedia.org)
  • open
  • Stents are used to open blockages in a tubule structure. (yahoo.com)
  • Their stents are still fully open. (medhelp.org)
  • The stent helps support the artery and keep it open. (nih.gov)
  • According to the author, from the use of Stent's compound as a support for facial tissues evolved the use of a stent to hold open various bodily structures. (wikipedia.org)
  • They found that there was no significant differences out to four years of follow-up between surgery and carotid stenting when counting all three, but carotid endarterectomy (CEA) has a higher risk of heart attacks and CAS has a higher risk of minor stroke than open surgery. (wikipedia.org)
  • The open, diamond-shape cell design of the stent allows the stent to eventually become embedded in the urethra, thus minimizing the risk for encrustation and migration. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lung
  • The benefit of having a drug-eluting stent is tremendous,\" said Dr. Elizabeth Nabel, director of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. (dailystrength.org)
  • Cambridge University
  • Stent received her bachelor's from Cambridge University, her Master of Science with distinction from the London School of Economics and Political Science, and her master's and doctorate from Harvard University. (brookings.edu)