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  • Diseases
  • Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 or human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-I), also called the adult T-cell lymphoma virus type 1, is a retrovirus of the human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV) family that has been implicated in several kinds of diseases including very aggressive adult T-cell lymphoma (ATL), HTLV-I-associated myelopathy, uveitis, Strongyloides stercoralis hyper-infection and some other diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • folliculitis
  • A boil, also called a furuncle, is a deep folliculitis, infection of the hair follicle. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sometimes the infections are relatively limited (such as a stye, boil, furuncle, or carbuncle), but other times they may spread to other skin areas (causing cellulitis, folliculitis, or impetigo). (wikipedia.org)
  • vancomycin
  • In fact, because vancomycin has poor gastrointestinal absorption, the only infection it can effectively treat orally is Clostridium difficile . (ama-assn.org)
  • patients
  • It is important to be aware that despite the differences described above for HA-MRSA and CA-MRSA, over time, it has become increasingly difficult to distinguish between them, since patients can become colonized with MRSA in one setting, but then demonstrate evidence of infection in another location. (clinicalpainadvisor.com)
  • In this model the transmission of staphylococcal infection was assumed to occur after contact with the transiently colonized hands of HCWs, who, in turn, acquire contamination only by touching colonized patients. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Through regular cleansing of hands, healthcare workers (HCWs) reduce the risk to transmitting nosocomial pathogens between patients and thus reduce the risk of exogenously-acquired infection. (biomedcentral.com)
  • All consecutive patients with a staphylococcal PJI infection of the hip, knee or shoulder prosthesis will be included, if no exclusion criterion is present, obviating the selection bias. (bioportfolio.com)
  • organism
  • Milder side-effects include: Hypokalemia Nausea and vomiting Diarrhea, often due to suppression of normal gastrointestinal bacteria, which, on occasion, leads to a more serious super-infection with an organism like Clostridium difficile Abdominal pain Yeast infections (thrush) affecting the mouth and tongue or vagina Agranulocytosis, neutropenia There is evidence that it induces cytochrome P-450 enzymes specifically CYP2C9. (wikipedia.org)
  • Prevention
  • 1 year of age, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention defines CoNS infection as the presence of clinical sepsis (e.g., hyperthermia, hypothermia, apnea, or bradycardia) and isolation of CoNS organisms, either cultured from two or more blood cultures drawn on separate occasions or obtained from at least one blood culture in a patient with an intravascular line, where the physician begins appropriate antimicrobial therapy. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • clinical
  • Finally, a deeper evaluation of the role of neutrophils and macrophages subtypes as well as their cooperation in promoting extravasation and activation of neutrophils and a better knowledge of the function of cytokines and T cells in promoting staphylococcal killing represent a critical step for planning of clinical trials and future vaccine development. (frontiersin.org)
  • Infants with clinical sepsis and culture-positive CoNS infection had lower mortality rates than infants with clinical sepsis and negative blood culture results. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • acute
  • However, it is currently unclear whether children who are highly susceptible to infection because of severe acute malnutrition (SAM) or HIV should be treated with antimicrobials specifically to cover CoNS. (lshtm.ac.uk)
  • These newly formed antibodies would arrive too late in an acute infection, however, so what we think of as "immunology" constitutes only the second half of the process. (wikipedia.org)
  • It most commonly refers to an acute spread of infection into the eye socket from either the adjacent sinuses or through the blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • species
  • S. saprophyticus, another coagulase-negative species that is part of the normal vaginal flora, is predominantly implicated in uncomplicated lower genitourinary tract infections in young sexually active women. (wikipedia.org)
  • Latex kits designed to detect both protein A and clumping factor also distinguish S. aureus from other staphylococcal species. (mhmedical.com)
  • healthcare
  • Hand hygiene is generally considered to be the most important measure that can be applied to prevent the spread of healthcare-associated infection (HAI). (biomedcentral.com)
  • resistance
  • The mecA gene, which is found in staphylococcal cassette chromosome SCC mec , codes for penicillin-binding protein (PBP) 2A, and this confers resistance to beta-lactam and non-beta-lactam antibiotics. (clinicalpainadvisor.com)
  • streptococcal
  • bloody opalescent discharge in streptococcal infection, while greenish discharge is seen in pseudomonas ulcer Bloody (sanguineous), usually seen in malignant ulcers and in healing ulcers with healthy granulation tissue Seropurulent Serosanguinous Serous with sulphur granules, seen in actinomycosis Yellowish, as seen in tuberculous ulcer The wounds from which ulcers arise can be caused by a wide variety of factors, but the main cause is impaired blood circulation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Streptococcal infections are identified on culture by their formation of pairs or chains. (wikipedia.org)
  • protein
  • 11 Some investigators have defined CoNS infection as either two positive blood cultures drawn within two days of each other or one positive blood culture and observed elevated C-reactive protein within two days of the CoNS positive culture. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • meningitis
  • Complications include hearing loss, blood infection, meningitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, and optic nerve damage (which could lead to blindness). (wikipedia.org)
  • streptococcal
  • bloody opalescent discharge in streptococcal infection, while greenish discharge is seen in pseudomonas ulcer Bloody (sanguineous), usually seen in malignant ulcers and in healing ulcers with healthy granulation tissue Seropurulent Serosanguinous Serous with sulphur granules, seen in actinomycosis Yellowish, as seen in tuberculous ulcer The wounds from which ulcers arise can be caused by a wide variety of factors, but the main cause is impaired blood circulation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Streptococcal infections are identified on culture by their formation of pairs or chains. (wikipedia.org)
  • enzyme
  • The Effect of Proteolytic Enzyme Serratiopeptidase in the Treatment of Experimental Implant-Related Infection", The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. (wikipedia.org)
  • opportunistic
  • Opportunistic infection may be caused by microbes ordinarily in contact with the host, such as pathogenic bacteria or fungi in the gastrointestinal or the upper respiratory tract, and they may also result from (otherwise innocuous) microbes acquired from other hosts (as in Clostridium difficile colitis) or from the environment as a result of traumatic introduction (as in surgical wound infections or compound fractures). (wikipedia.org)
  • meningitis
  • Complications include hearing loss, blood infection, meningitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, and optic nerve damage (which could lead to blindness). (wikipedia.org)
  • MRSA
  • MRSA is responsible for several difficult-to-treat infections in humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • MRSA began as a hospital-acquired infection, but has developed limited endemic status and is now community-acquired as well as livestock-acquired. (wikipedia.org)
  • inflammation
  • PPIB contributes to the replication and infection of viruses causing diseases such as AIDS, hepatitis C, measles, and influenza A. Thus, therapeutic targeting of PPIB with selective inhibitors may prove effective in combating viral infections and inflammation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mammalian hosts react to infections with an innate response, often involving inflammation, followed by an adaptive response. (wikipedia.org)
  • diseases
  • Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 or human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-I), also called the adult T-cell lymphoma virus type 1, is a retrovirus of the human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV) family that has been implicated in several kinds of diseases including very aggressive adult T-cell lymphoma (ATL), HTLV-I-associated myelopathy, uveitis, Strongyloides stercoralis hyper-infection and some other diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • patients
  • Like many other coagulase-negative staphylococci, S. hominis may occasionally cause infection in patients whose immune systems are compromised, for example by chemotherapy or predisposing illness. (wikipedia.org)
  • common
  • To get around the usage annoyance, it is common for health professionals to speak of colonization (rather than infection) when they mean that some of the pathogens are present but that no clinically apparent infection (no disease) is present. (wikipedia.org)
  • treatment
  • cialis chemicals anti-bacterial are immediately read as severity attention to use and provide current cations that Do mentioned by Body of the archives with the fungus ED-treatment questions, in treatment with eating infections. (wayneswheelsnc.com)
  • result
  • However, only about 1-5% of infected persons are thought to develop cancer as a result of the infection with HTLV-I over their lifetimes. (wikipedia.org)
  • rate
  • The infection rate is about 1% in Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, and Vanuatu, where the genotype C predominates. (wikipedia.org)
  • appears
  • HTLV-I infection in the United States appears to be about half as prevalent among IV drug users and about one-tenth as prevalent in the population at large as HIV infection. (wikipedia.org)