• Effects of Splenectomy
  • Effects of Splenectomy on Spontaneously Chronic Pancreatitis in aly/aly Mice," Clinical and Developmental Immunology , vol. 2010, Article ID 614890, 8 pages, 2010. (hindawi.com)
  • Furthermore, we investigated the effects of splenectomy on the infiltration of CD4 + T, CD8 + T, B cells and macrophages into pancreatic tissues and the relationship between mononuclear cells and pancreatitis developing in splenectomized aly/aly mice, which have a complete absence of secondary lymphoid organs. (hindawi.com)
  • infection
  • Specifically, splenectomy increases the risks of postoperative and long-term infection, and the procedure is associated with excessive transfusion requirements. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Risk for infection after splenectomy is familiar, but blood clots and, by extension, pulmonary hypertension are emerging as another possible threat. (acpinternist.org)
  • These bacteria often cause a sore throat under normal circumstances but after splenectomy, when infecting bacteria cannot be adequately opsonized, the infection becomes more severe. (wikipedia.org)
  • The risk to asplenic patients has been expressed as equivalent to an adult dying in a road traffic accident (in every 100 people without spleens, 1 to 5 would develop a severe infection per decade) (reference UK Splenectomy Trust Advice)-hence sensible precautions are advisable. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because of the increased risk of infection, physicians administer oral antibiotics as a prophylaxis after a surgical splenectomy (or starting at birth, for congenital asplenia or functional asplenia). (wikipedia.org)
  • trauma
  • Unstable trauma patients who have suspicion of splenic injury and evidence of blood, either by deep perintoneal lavage or by a focus abdominal songraphic technique study, should proceed straight to the operating room for exploration, and preferably undergo a splenic repair versus splenectomy. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • The indication for splenectomy can be divided into six categories: hypersplenism, trauma/injury, autoimmune/erythrocyte disorder, primary tumor/mass, incidental, and diagnostic. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • Acquired asplenia occurs for several reasons: Following splenectomy due to splenic rupture from trauma or because of tumor After splenectomy with the goal of interfering with splenic function, as a treatment for diseases (e.g. idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, thalassemia, spherocytosis), in which the spleen's usual activity exacerbates the disease Due to underlying diseases that destroy the spleen (autosplenectomy), e.g. sickle-cell disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Occasionally
  • Occasionally, splenectomy may be required for patients with very large spleens who haven't responded to or who relapse after treatment with cladribine (Leustatin®), penostatin (Nipent®), rituximab (Rituxan®) and BL22. (llscanada.org)
  • patients
  • However, splenectomy has been shown to increase the risk of secondary acute leukemia in patients with Hodgkin's disease. (encyclopedia.com)
  • When categorized by gender, splenectomies are roughly split down the middle between male and female, with 45% of patients being men and 55% being women. (acpinternist.org)
  • According to a scientific review published in 2015 in the World Journal of Respirology, pulmonary vascular changes indicative of microthromboembolism appeared in 54% of splenectomized patients with thalassemia compared with 16% of those who had not had splenectomy. (acpinternist.org)
  • The reasons behind CTEPH have remained elusive, but new research is starting to shed more light on the issue and on the important role of primary care in monitoring and treating patients after splenectomy. (acpinternist.org)
  • There also is some conjecture that post-splenectomy patients may be at elevated risk of subsequently developing diabetes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Splenectomy patients typically have Howell-Jolly bodies and less commonly Heinz bodies in their blood smears. (wikipedia.org)
  • Splenectomy is indicated in patients with severe uncontrollable haemorrhage. (wikipedia.org)
  • acute
  • A study that Dr. Crary coauthored in 2009 for the journal Blood observed that acute portal vein thrombosis often occurred after splenectomy, but the various reasons behind that were unclear. (acpinternist.org)
  • Mice
  • Inflammation infiltration and development of the pancreatitis in aly/aly mice were suppressed effectively after splenectomy, which was, at least partly, correlated to inhibition of the infiltration of T and B cells in pancreatic tissues but not to macrophages. (hindawi.com)
  • clinical
  • Consideration of two cases studied by the authors indicates that marked clinical improvement may be associated with splenectomy in selected cases of agnogenic myeloid metaplasia. (bmj.com)
  • often
  • but due to the complications associated with splenectomy (low blood cell counts, fatigue , frequent infections, and easy bleeding or bruising), physicians are now more often recommending chemotherapy. (encyclopedia.com)
  • years
  • It is suggested that splenectomized persons receive the following vaccinations, and ideally prior to planned splenectomy surgery: Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (not before 2 years of age). (wikipedia.org)
  • surgery
  • The incidence of thrombosis involving the portal venous system after splenectomy ranges from 5% to 37%, all occurring within two months of surgery. (acpinternist.org)
  • done
  • Fewer splenectomies are being done, but thromboembolic disease afterward is now more recognized and therefore being diagnosed more frequently. (acpinternist.org)
  • According to a 2014 study published in the Journal of the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons , 7,050 splenectomies were done in 2007, 6,304 took place in 2008, 6,174 took place in 2009, and 5,998 took place in 2010. (acpinternist.org)
  • less
  • Splenectomy is actually being performed less frequently, but thromboembolic disease following splenectomy is perhaps now more recognized and therefore being diagnosed more frequently," said Shelley Crary, MD, a pediatrician and associate professor of pediatric hematology-oncology at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. (acpinternist.org)