• respiratory
  • Spirometry is invaluable as a screening test of general respiratory health in the same way that blood pressure provides important information about general cardiovascular health. (ersjournals.com)
  • Due to the patient cooperation required, spirometry can only be used on children old enough to comprehend and follow the instructions given (6 years old or more), and only on patients who are able to understand and follow instructions - thus, this test is not suitable for patients who are unconscious, heavily sedated, or have limitations that would interfere with vigorous respiratory efforts. (wikipedia.org)
  • Spirometry is used to help detect, but not diagnose, respiratory issues like COPD, and asthma. (wikipedia.org)
  • FEV1
  • The most common parameters measured in spirometry are Vital capacity (VC), Forced vital capacity (FVC), Forced expiratory volume (FEV) at timed intervals of 0.5, 1.0 (FEV1), 2.0, and 3.0 seconds, forced expiratory flow 25-75% (FEF 25-75) and maximal voluntary ventilation (MVV), also known as Maximum breathing capacity. (wikipedia.org)
  • spirometer
  • Thoracic, abdominal, or cerebral aneurysms Cataracts or recent eye surgery Recent thoracic or abdominal surgery Nausea, vomiting, or acute illness Recent or current viral infection Undiagnosed hypertension The spirometry test is performed using a device called a spirometer, which comes in several different varieties. (wikipedia.org)
  • workplace
  • This course is intended for nurses, medical assistants, and other occupational health and safety practitioners who are responsible for conducting spirometry in the workplace or other settings. (uiowa.edu)
  • Methods Spirometry was carried out as part of a research study investigating the relationship between workplace exposures and ill health in the brick, stone and foundry industries. (ersjournals.com)
  • expiratory
  • In this document, the most important aspects of spirometry are the forced vital capacity (FVC), which is the volume delivered during an expiration made as forcefully and completely as possible starting from full inspiration, and the forced expiratory volume (FEV) in one second, which is the volume delivered in the first second of an FVC manoeuvre. (ersjournals.com)
  • tests
  • However, there are some instances when spirometry tests can do more harm than good and are contraindicated. (news-medical.net)
  • Additionally, unstable angina, uncontrolled hypertension or a recent myocardial infarction (heart attack) or stroke are also contraindications for spirometry tests. (news-medical.net)
  • Sometimes, to assess the reversibility of a particular condition, a bronchodilator is administered to counteract the effects of the bronchoconstrictor before repeating the spirometry tests. (wikipedia.org)
  • guidelines
  • Over the past decade or so, spirometry guidelines have increasingly been moving towards recommending a sitting posture, but stressing the importance of recording the testing posture. (personneltoday.com)
  • procedure
  • It highlights that some workers were not able to perform reproducible spirometry despite coaching from a healthcare professional using a rigorous operating procedure. (ersjournals.com)
  • cause
  • Other contraindications for spirometry include coughing up blood (hemoptysis) without a known cause, active tuberculosis and a history of syncope associated with forced exhalation. (news-medical.net)