• Religiousness
  • However, 92% believed that religion and mental illness were connected and that religious issues should be addressed in treatment, and while 42% believed religiousness could lead to mental illness, 61% said that it could protect against mental illness. (rcpsych.org)
  • ISBN 978-1-57230-711-7 Multidimensional Measurement of Religiousness/Spirituality (book containing 2 chapters, scales, by Pargament) VITA: Kenneth I. Pargament, BGSU Kenneth I. Pargament (2007). (wikipedia.org)
  • 2002
  • 1992 - American Heart Association Research Fellowship 1997 - Basic Science Award, Ohio University College of Osteopathic Medicine 2002 - ECOG Young Investigators Award 2002 - CEC- Clinical Pharmacology of Anti-tumor Drugs 2005 - Fellow, American College of Physicians 2011 - D Magazine - Best Doctors: Oncology-Hematology Initial management of metastatic disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2002 "Healing and Religion: A Jewish Perspective," Yale Journal for Humanities in Medicine, special issue "Spirituality, Religious Wisdom, and Care of the Patient. (wikipedia.org)
  • She founded the "Religions, Medicines, and Healing Group" program unit of the American Academy of Religion (AAR) in 2002, and served as co-chair until 2010, when she moved to the group's Steering Committee. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dr. Barnes served as the Regional Director of the New England/Maritimes Region of the American Academy of Religion, and a member of the AAR Board of Directors, from 2002-2008. (wikipedia.org)
  • world religions
  • Susan Starr Sered (born 1955) is Professor of Sociology at Suffolk University and Senior Researcher at Suffolk University's Center for Women's Health and Human Rights, having previously been the director of the "Religion, Health and Healing Initiative" at the Harvard University Center for the Study of World Religions, and a Professor of Sociology and Anthropology at Bar-Ilan University, Israel. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1999
  • Since 1999, Barnes has been a member of the faculty of Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), where she founded and directed an urban ethnographic program-the Boston Healing Landscape Project (BHLP), a program for the study of religions, medicines, and healing funded by the Ford Foundation from 2001-2007. (wikipedia.org)
  • complementary
  • Abstract Objectives: To explore the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for infertility in a multicultural healthcare setting and to compare Western and non-Western infertility patients' reasons for using CAM and the meanings they attribute to CAM use. (biomedsearch.com)
  • P]hysic and faith", wrote historian of medicine Ray Porter "while generally complementary. (wikipedia.org)
  • by Alfredo Gomez-Beloz Ph.D., M.P.H.,1 and Noel Chavez Ph.D., R.D., L.D.2, The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine Vol. 7, No. 5, 2005 "Botánicas: Globalization of Religion through Commodity" Archived September 11, 2006, at the Wayback Machine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Her subsequent research explores relationships between cultural, religious/spiritual, and therapeutic pluralism-particularly in the United States-and complementary and alternative and integrative medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • The BHLP's research focused on complementary and alternative medicine among the culturally complex patient communities in the Boston area. (wikipedia.org)
  • beliefs
  • Do Patients Want Physicians to Inquire About Their Spiritual or Religious Beliefs If They Become Gravely Ill? (upenn.edu)
  • The influence of spiritual beliefs and practices on the treatment preferences of African Americans: a review of the literature. (jamanetwork.com)
  • Even in the 1st century AD, Josephus had used the Greek term ioudaismos, which some translate as Judaism today, even though he used it as an ethnic term, not one linked to modern abstract concepts of religion as a set of beliefs. (wikipedia.org)
  • comparative religion
  • The study of religion encompasses a wide variety of academic disciplines, including theology, comparative religion and social scientific studies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Barnes received her BA in American Studies from Smith College, her Master of Theological Studies from Harvard Divinity School, and her M.A. and Ph.D. from Harvard University in Comparative Religion and the allied field of Medical Anthropology. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mentored by historian and Comparative Religion scholar John B. Carman, Chinese religion scholar Tu Weiming, and medical anthropologist Arthur Kleinman, her early ethnographic work centered on Chinese healing practices in the United States, particularly in the region of Boston, Massachusetts. (wikipedia.org)
  • histories
  • Religions have sacred histories and narratives, which may be preserved in sacred scriptures, and symbols and holy places, that aim mostly to give a meaning to life. (wikipedia.org)
  • As part of this project, Dr. Barnes has conducted fieldwork funded by the National Library of Medicine, and gathered hundreds of oral histories in regions throughout the United States, while also building an archive of related source materials. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1998
  • My 1998 Scientific Review of Alternative Medicine article about Matthews' study-in-progress concentrated on media coverage that the research was receiving even as the data were still being collected. (gpposner.com)
  • practices
  • This chapter presents a brief history of Suriname, addresses the ethnopharmacological practices of Maroons and Creoles as well as Hindustanis and Javanese, and concludes with a few remarks on the previsions provided by the country's rich plant-based traditional medicine. (intechopen.com)
  • But conservative Islam has steadily gained sway in the historically moderate country, and religious bodies have issued edicts forbidding a range of animist spiritual practices as idolatrous. (newslook.com)
  • However, most botánica have products associated with other spiritual practices such as candomblé, curanderismo, espiritismo, macumba and santería. (wikipedia.org)
  • All these businesses have some parallels with shops specializing in traditional Chinese medicine and similar practices from outsides the Americas. (wikipedia.org)
  • World's
  • World's largest Science, Technology & Medicine Open Access book publisher. (intechopen.com)
  • The society has claimed that various disasters may be prevented or relieved by prayer, often aided by "Spiritual Energy Batteries" meant to store healing psychic energy The society also believes that it is to make the way for the "Next Master," a messianic figure who will descend upon Earth in a flying saucer, possessing 'magic' more powerful than all the world's armies. (wikipedia.org)
  • psychological
  • Religion is an important psychological and social factor that may serve either as a powerful resource for healing or be intricately intertwined with psychopathology. (rcpsych.org)
  • He currently studies various relationships between religion, psychological well-being and stress, as well as other closely related subjects. (wikipedia.org)
  • Systema draws upon breathing and relaxation techniques, as well as elements of Russian Orthodox thought, to foster self-conscience and calmness, and to benefit the practitioner in different levels: the physical, the psychological and the spiritual. (wikipedia.org)
  • Research
  • Recent research, however, has uncovered findings which suggest that to some patients religion may also be a resource that helps them to cope with the stress of their illness or with dismal life circumstances. (rcpsych.org)
  • Included are research papers and notes on heart disease, religion and medicine, the spiritual factors in healing, and psychosomatic illness as well as personal and professional correspondence. (dartmouth.edu)
  • Also included are personal and professional correspondence, as well as case studies, documenting his work in and research of cardiac illnesses, psychosomatic illnesses and spiritual factors in healing. (dartmouth.edu)
  • largely
  • These negative views toward religion were based largely on clinical experience, anecdotal reports and the personal opinions of influential psychiatrists. (rcpsych.org)
  • John A. Saliba states that unlike many other New Age or UFO religions, the Aetherius Society is largely considered uncontroversial, although its esoteric and millenarian aspects are sometimes ridiculed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Oncology
  • He is also the reviewer for several other journals including New England Journal of Medicine, The Lancet and Lancet Oncology. (wikipedia.org)
  • faith
  • Banks, J. W. " The Importance of Incorporating Faith and Spirituality Issues in the Care of Patients with Chronic Daily Headache . (upenn.edu)
  • Depression
  • Johnsons (2008) recent review also concludes that there is a positive association between religion and lower rates of depression. (hhs.gov)
  • He finds that 116 studies find positive effects of religion on reducing depression, 43 find null effects, and 4 find negative effects. (hhs.gov)
  • folk
  • A botánica (often written botanica and less commonly known as a hierbería or botica) is a retail store that sells folk medicine, religious candles and statuary, amulets, and other products regarded as magical or as alternative medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Islam
  • Its advocates insist shamanism doesn't clash with Islam or western medicine - rather it fills a vital mystical role in an increasingly emotionally-challenging modern world. (newslook.com)
  • Study
  • Dr. Matthews was discussing his nearly completed study on the medical efficacy of intercessory prayer before "a slightly bewildered crowd" of future doctors at St. Louis University School of Medicine. (gpposner.com)
  • Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, 43(3), 409-418. (wikipedia.org)
  • Desiderius Erasmus (1466-1536) helped revive knowledge of ancient Greek medicine, Renaissance popes were often patrons of the study of anatomy, and Catholic artists such as Michelangelo advanced knowledge of the field through sketching cadavers. (wikipedia.org)
  • More recently, she published New Geographies of Religion and Healing: States of the Field, a monograph on the state of the history and more recent developments in this interdisciplinary area of study. (wikipedia.org)
  • associate
  • Since 2009, he has been editor-in-chief of the Journal of Behavioral Medicine, where he was earlier an associate editor (2005-2009). (wikipedia.org)
  • traditional medicine
  • All these groups have made their own specific contribution to Suriname's traditional medicine, which has resulted in a myriad of remedies against many disorders, mainly employing a variety of plants. (intechopen.com)
  • Ritual uses of palms in traditional medicine in sub-Saharan Africa: a review. (biomedsearch.com)
  • This is particularly prevalent in traditional Asian martial arts which may teach bone-setting, herbalism, and other aspects of traditional medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • however
  • It is, however, a challenge to find detailed information on the ritual use of palms, which are an inextricable part of African medicinal and spiritual systems. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Healing
  • Stefan Isaksson notes that it has "become a complex religious belief system that includes an extraterrestrial hierarchy of various spiritual masters and such concepts as universal karma and religious healing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Before founding the Aetherius Society, King had been deeply involved in spiritual healing and had joined various theosophically-based metaphysical groups in London that were a marginal part of the religious scene. (wikipedia.org)
  • He was known as a medicine man and spiritual leader who worked to preserve the history, religion, and herbal healing methods of his people. (wikipedia.org)
  • This anthropologically influenced cultural history examines how understandings of medicine, religion, race, and the body informed how Westerners in both Europe and later the U.S. understood and responded to the Chinese and their healing traditions from the thirteenth century through 1848. (wikipedia.org)
  • More recently, she published Chinese Medicine and Healing: An Illustrated History (co-edited with TJ Hinrichs, Harvard University Press, 2013). (wikipedia.org)
  • She is currently writing a book on the cultural and social history of Chinese medicine and healing traditions in the United States, beginning in 1849 and continuing up through the present. (wikipedia.org)
  • and Teaching Religion and Healing (co-edited with Ines Talamantez, Oxford University, 2006). (wikipedia.org)
  • She also co-edited a series with Sered on religion and healing, for Praeger Press, a division of Greenwood. (wikipedia.org)
  • emphasis
  • Traditional Korean martial arts place emphasis on the development of the practitioner's spiritual and philosophical development. (wikipedia.org)
  • Assessment
  • Studies of psychiatrists in the UK, Canada and the USA suggest that there remains widespread prejudice against religion and little integration of it into the assessment or care of patients. (rcpsych.org)
  • The majority (92%) recognised the importance of spiritual dimensions in their patients' lives and a quarter considered referral to the chaplaincy service, but more complete integration of spiritual advisors into the assessment and management of individual cases was rare. (rcpsych.org)
  • mystical
  • A religious experience (sometimes known as a spiritual experience, sacred experience, or mystical experience) is a subjective experience which is interpreted within a religious framework. (wikipedia.org)
  • medical
  • Initiatives such as the Association of American Medical Colleges' Medical School Objectives Program have helped to clarify the spiritual competencies that should be developed in learners. (umhsheadlines.org)
  • The Michigan Medicine Web site does not provide specific medical advice and does not endorse any medical or professional service obtained through information provided on this site or any links to this site. (umhsheadlines.org)
  • William N. Chambers began his career at Dartmouth Medical School in 1946 as a teaching fellow in medicine. (dartmouth.edu)
  • Elias Smith's career particularly emphasized medical and spiritual reform. (wikipedia.org)
  • Linda L. Barnes (born 1953) is an American medical anthropologist, a Professor of Family Medicine at Boston University School of Medicine, and in the Graduate Division of Religious Studies at Boston University. (wikipedia.org)
  • aspects
  • Closely mapped to the Royal College of Surgeons syllabus on retrieval and transfer medicine, this title comprehensively covers all aspects of retrieval medicine, from basic flight physiology to more complex retrievals and common pitfalls. (oup.com)
  • chapters
  • Topics include retrieval systems and coordination, crisis resource management, shock, and a range of chapters focusing on responding to specific areas of medicine when encountered in the retrieval environment, such as cardiology and obstetrics and gynaecology. (oup.com)
  • cultures
  • The concept of religion was formed in the 16th and 17th centuries, despite the fact that ancient sacred texts like the Bible, the Quran, and others did not have a word or even a concept of religion in the original languages and neither did the people or the cultures in which these sacred texts were written. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other Alaskan Native cultures have traditionally had similar spiritual mediators, although Alaskan Native religion has many forms and variants. (wikipedia.org)
  • care
  • Ariana, R. " Palliative Care and Spirituality . (upenn.edu)
  • We used a qualitative approach to explore barriers to biomedical care and reasons for use of traditional medicines for the treatment of cervical cancer in Gulu, northern Uganda. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Puchalski CM, Vitillo R, Hull SK, Reller N. Improving the spiritual dimension of whole person care: reaching national and international consensus. (jamanetwork.com)
  • True G, Phipps EJ, Braitman LE, Harralson T, Harris D, Tester W. Treatment preferences and advance care planning at end of life: the role of ethnicity and spiritual coping in cancer patients. (jamanetwork.com)
  • development
  • and incorporating spirituality into professional and personal development. (umhsheadlines.org)
  • Cathedral schools evolved into a well integrated network of medieval universities and Catholic scientists (many of them clergymen) made a number of important discoveries which aided the development of modern science and medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • people
  • When there were people he placed them upon the earth, but he soon observed that they were subject to sickness, misery, and death, and that unless he provided them with the Sacred Medicine they would soon become extinct. (wikipedia.org)
  • After consulting as to what would be best for the comfort and welfare of the Anishinaabeg, these manidoog agreed to ask Gichi Manidoo to communicate the Mystery of the Sacred Medicine to the people. (wikipedia.org)