• Araneae
  • Despite the common names, they are neither true scorpions (order Scorpiones) nor true spiders (order Araneae). (wikipedia.org)
  • Like that of the spider order, the Araneae, the body plan of the Solifugae has two main tagmata: the prosoma, or cephalothorax, is the anterior tagma, and the 10-segmented abdomen, or opisthosoma, is the posterior tagma. (wikipedia.org)
  • As shown in the illustrations, the solifugid prosoma and opisthosoma are not separated by nearly as clear a constriction and connecting tube or "pedicel" as occurs in "true spiders", the order Araneae. (wikipedia.org)
  • Family: Scytodidae Blackwall, 1864", World Spider Catalog, Natural History Museum Bern, retrieved 2015-11-16 Arachnology Home Pages: Araneae Info about Spitting spider Scytodes thoracica Platnick, N.I. 2003. (wikipedia.org)
  • Checklist of Danish Spiders (Araneae). (wikipedia.org)
  • proteins
  • Functional characterization of venom proteins has important biomedical applications, including the identification of drug leads or probes for cellular receptors. (jove.com)
  • This technique has the advantage over protocols that isolate venom from whole gland homogenates, which do not separate genuine venom components from cellular proteins that are not secreted as part of the venom. (jove.com)
  • The venom collection procedure is followed by a protocol for dissecting spider venom glands, with results demonstrating that this leads to the characterization of venom-expressed proteins and peptides at the sequence level. (jove.com)
  • The injection of venom precedes the injection with digestive fluid, and the overlap of proteins between venom and digestive fluid suggests an early involvement in EOD. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The molecular background with respect to the proteins used for silk, venom and digestive fluids, however, is still understudied. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The venom contains at least 286 compound and 49 novel proteins. (wikipedia.org)
  • commonly
  • Cupiennius salei, commonly called the tiger wandering spider, is a large spider belonging to a group of wandering spiders found in Central America (also one of many diverse types that mistakenly get called banana spiders), although this species is specifically from Eastern Mexico, Guatemala, Belize and Honduras. (wikipedia.org)
  • Austracantha minax is most commonly known as "jewel spiders" due to their body colouration. (wikipedia.org)
  • small spiders
  • They are relatively small spiders, reaching a maximum total body length of only around 12 mm (0.47 in) for females, and 5 mm (0.20 in) for males. (wikipedia.org)
  • large
  • In the mid-1950s it was realised that the spider is an ideal model for biological research because of its large size, inactive behaviour, and ease of breeding in laboratories. (wikipedia.org)
  • During about August of the same year, the female will create a large, white egg sac, containing roughly 50-130 eggs, which is then transported outside and hung from the edges of the web with multiple radiating bands of silk. (wikipedia.org)
  • Only female spiders have venom glands large enough for a bite to be harmful and require medical treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • The medium to large spiders range from eight to twenty-three millimeters long. (wikipedia.org)
  • The female black widow has unusually large venom glands and its bite can be particularly harmful to humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • bite
  • Studies focussing on the behavioural adaptations to different life styles in spiders, cursorial or web building, diurnal or nocturnal, attack wrapping or bite attacking (based on venom use), are numerous. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Then, before the insect can extricate itself, the spider rushes over to bite it and wrap it in silk. (wikipedia.org)
  • world's
  • citation needed] While the world's biggest spiders are mygalomorphs-Theraphosa blondi (Latreille, 1804) has a body length of 10 cm, and a leg span of 28 cm-some species are less than one millimeter long. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • Representative results demonstrate the detection of known venom peptides from the collected sample using mass spectrometry. (jove.com)
  • It is often known as the garden centre spider because it is found on houseplants growing in hothouses in garden centres and is able to survive the winter in greenhouses that are heated to maintain a temperature well above freezing point. (wikipedia.org)
  • Solifugae is an order of animals in the class Arachnida known variously as camel spiders, wind scorpions, sun spiders, or solifuges. (wikipedia.org)
  • Later it was realized that the common ancestors of all spiders had these features (a state known as symplesiomorphy). (wikipedia.org)
  • In some parts of Australia they are also widely known as "Christmas spiders" because they are most numerous during the summer months (December and January). (wikipedia.org)
  • In Japan, the Kimura spider (Heptathela kimurai) is well known. (wikipedia.org)
  • widespread
  • While the importance of these proteases in spider venom and digestive fluid was previously noted, we now highlight their widespread use across different spider taxa. (biomedcentral.com)
  • This may sometimes be specified further as "Australian jewel spiders" due to the common name being shared with the unrelated North American jewel spider Araneus gemmoides, as well as the widespread jewel box spider Gasteracantha cancriformis. (wikipedia.org)
  • kimura
  • The Kimura spider, or kimura-gumo in Japanese, Heptathela kimurai, is an Old World spider, found primarily in Japan and named after Arika Kimura, who collected it in 1920. (wikipedia.org)
  • tarantula
  • For now it is impossible to know whether foot silk pre-dates web spinning, or whether this type of tarantula evolved it separately. (blogspot.com)
  • For example, it could instead be true that copies of silk glands sprouted up on the feet of a species of tarantula, which proved to be useful when climbing. (blogspot.com)
  • The word "tarantula" has been applied to several very different kinds of spider . (blogspot.com)
  • Scorpions
  • In scorpions and some spiders, however, the blood contains haemocyanin, a copper-based pigment with a similar function to haemoglobin in vertebrates. (wikipedia.org)