• world's
  • Species 2000 is a federation of database organizations across the world that compiles the Catalogue of Life, a comprehensive checklist of the world's species, in partnership with the Integrated Taxonomic Information System (ITIS). (wikipedia.org)
  • Over 40% of the world's species are estimated to be at risk of extinction. (wikipedia.org)
  • Strange and endangered species - A schoolboy reaches out to touch a humpheaded Maori wrasse as it swims in the world's largest Great Barrier Reef exhibit at the Sydney Aquarium in June 2003. (cnn.com)
  • 2001
  • Altered Species, early knowned as Rodentz, is a 2001 horror film, about a scientist who has found a way to regenerate damaged tissue in the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • The creation of Species 2000 was initiated by Frank Bisby and colleagues at the University of Reading in the UK in 1997 and the Catalogue of Life was first published in 2001. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2000
  • While administrators and member organizations of Species 2000 are located across the world, the secretariat is located at the University of Reading. (wikipedia.org)
  • binomial
  • In open nomenclature it indicates that available material or evidence suggests that the proposed species is related to, has an affinity to, but is not identical to, the species with the binomial name that follows. (wikipedia.org)
  • extinction
  • Bonn, Germany, May 22, 2008 (IUCN/Wiley-Blackwell) - The first study to determine the global status of 21 species of oceanic pelagic sharks and rays reveals that 11 of them are threatened with extinction, says IUCN on International Biodiversity Day. (iucn.org)
  • The 2008 IUCN Red List Birds Update makes grim reading with 1,226 species of birds threatened with extinction. (iucn.org)
  • defines
  • In the nomenclature codes of zoology and bacteriology, no taxonomic ranks are defined at the level between subgenera and species, while the botanical code defines four ranks below genera (section, subsections, series and subseries). (wikipedia.org)
  • meanings
  • Several terms are used synonymously for a species complex, but some of them may also have slightly different, or more narrow meanings. (wikipedia.org)
  • Unlike their more general use elsewhere, the List uses the terms "endangered species" and "threatened species" with particular meanings: "Endangered" (EN) species lie between "Vulnerable" (VU) and "Critically Endangered" (CR) species, while "Threatened" species are those species determined to be Vulnerable, Endangered or Critically Endangered. (wikipedia.org)
  • distinguish
  • Introduction of a species outside its native range is all that is required to be qualified as an "introduced species" such that one can distinguish between introduced species that may not occur except in cultivation, under domestication or captivity whereas others become established outside their native range and reproduce without human assistance. (wikipedia.org)
  • biology
  • In biology, a species is the basic unit of biological classification and a taxonomic rank, as well as a unit of biodiversity, but it has proven difficult to find a satisfactory definition. (wikipedia.org)
  • Modern biology understands a species as "separately evolving metapopulation lineage" but acknowledges that the criteria to delimit species may depend on the group studied. (wikipedia.org)
  • Naturalisation (biology) Invasive species Weed Morse A.P. 1916. (wikipedia.org)
  • aquatic
  • 3.1 The Marine Resources Department coordinates all aspects of aquatic non-indigenous species. (mbl.edu)
  • 3.1.3 May be requested to develop and submit a Non-indigenous Aquatic Organism Risk Analysis Protocol or a Species Specific Containment Protocol ( both to be written ) for review by the Non-indigenous Species Risk and Management Committee ( to be constituted ). (mbl.edu)
  • occur
  • Western juniper may hybridize with Utah juniper ( J. osteosperma ) where the two species occur together in northwestern Nevada east of California's Warner Mountains. (fed.us)
  • conserve
  • Work with our partners to conserve species and their habitat so that listing under the ESA is not necessary. (fws.gov)
  • reproductive
  • They are identified by the rigorous study of differences between individual species, making use of minute morphological details, tests of reproductive isolation, or DNA-based methods such as molecular phylogenetics or DNA barcoding. (wikipedia.org)
  • habitat
  • Listed as Near Threatened because its Extent of Occurrence is probably not much greater than 20,000 km2, and its habitat is in decline, thus making the species close to qualifying for Vulnerable. (iucnredlist.org)
  • Efforts to survey the species over the past two decades have been hampered by the remote nature of its habitat, the patchiness of their distribution and years of civil unrest within the DRC. (worldwildlife.org)
  • Protect endangered and threatened species and their habitat, and work with our partners to help them recover. (fws.gov)
  • Section 4 of the ESA directs us to list species as endangered or threatened when they are imperiled, and to designate critical habitat that's essential for their continued existence. (fws.gov)
  • All Federal agencies have a responsibility to ensure that their actions do not jeopardize the existence of any listed species or adversely modify designated critical habitat. (fws.gov)
  • genera
  • Eleven countries in the arid and semi-arid regions of the world participated in the systematic collection of seeds of some 281 provenances of 43 species, mainly of the genera Acacia and Prosopis , and in the establishment of comparative trials. (fao.org)
  • example
  • An example of a superspecies is Species aggregate Used for a species complex, especially in plant taxa where polypoidy and apomixis are common. (wikipedia.org)
  • An example is the species of dink frog, Diasporus ventrimaculatus, originally described as Diasporus ventrimaculatus sp. (wikipedia.org)
  • belongs
  • In a suitable context it also may suggest the possibility that the shell belongs to a species that has not yet been described. (wikipedia.org)
  • Humans
  • Humans have been reintroducing species for food and pest control for thousands of years. (wikipedia.org)
  • It may have had help from humans as an introduced species or it may not. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bonobos and chimpanzees look very similar and both share 98.7% of their DNA with humans-making the two species our closest living relatives. (worldwildlife.org)
  • exotic
  • All transport media (to include water and organic packing material) and containers will be disposed of in such a way to prevent the introduction of non-indigenous (exotic) species or pathogens into the local environment. (mbl.edu)
  • ecosystem
  • Some have a negative effect on a local ecosystem, while other introduced species may have no negative effect or only minor impact. (wikipedia.org)
  • Origin
  • Charles Darwin's 1859 book The Origin of Species explained how species could arise by natural selection. (wikipedia.org)
  • A cryptogenic species ("cryptogenic" being derived from Greek "κρυπτός", meaning hidden, and "γένεσις", meaning origin) is a species whose origins are unknown. (wikipedia.org)
  • This term, introduced by Ernst Mayr in 1942, was initially used with the same meaning as cryptic species, but later authors emphasized the common phylogenetic origin. (wikipedia.org)
  • important
  • The Seven Species have played an important role in the food of the Israelites (later: Jews) in the Land of Israel and the religious traditions of Judaism. (wikipedia.org)
  • The seven species are all important ingredients in Israeli cuisine today Cooper 1993, pp. 4-9. (wikipedia.org)
  • The choice of B {\displaystyle {\mathcal {B}}} as the category on which species operate is important. (wikipedia.org)
  • With the Arctic grayling, T. thymallus is one of the economically important Thymallus species, being raised commercially and fished for sport. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is an important species in many early- to late-seral and subclimax plant communities in Idaho [ 53 ]. (fed.us)
  • Scientists
  • Scientists and conservationists need a species definition which allows them to work, regardless of the theoretical difficulties. (wikipedia.org)
  • The effects of introduced species on natural environments have gained much scrutiny from scientists, governments, farmers and others. (wikipedia.org)
  • There have been calls from scientists to consider a species "invasive" only in terms of their spread and reproduction rather than the harm they may cause. (wikipedia.org)
  • list
  • These two grains are mentioned first in the biblical list of the Seven Species of the land of Israel and their importance as food in ancient Israelite cuisine is also seen in the celebration of the barley harvest at the festival of Shavuot and of the wheat harvest at the festival of Sukkot. (wikipedia.org)
  • The "description format" of a structure (such as adjacency list versus adjacency matrix for graphs) is irrelevant, because species are purely algebraic. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2012, the IUCN Red List featured 3079 animal and 2655 plant species as endangered (EN) worldwide. (wikipedia.org)
  • populations
  • Those species of "Near Threatened" (NT) and "Least Concern" (LC) status have been assessed and found to have relatively robust and healthy populations, though these may be in decline. (wikipedia.org)
  • terms
  • In combinatorial mathematics, the theory of combinatorial species is an abstract, systematic method for analysing discrete structures in terms of generating functions. (wikipedia.org)
  • include
  • Other ways of defining species include their karyotype, DNA sequence, morphology, behaviour or ecological niche. (wikipedia.org)
  • widely
  • At the time, however, it was still widely believed that there was no organic connection between species, no matter how similar they appeared. (wikipedia.org)
  • sufficient
  • In the 19th century, biologists grasped that species could evolve given sufficient time. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acclimatized species are not necessarily optimally adjusted to their new environment and may just be physically/behaviorally sufficient for the new environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • often
  • Any structure - an instance of a particular species - is associated with some set, and there are often many possible structures for the same set. (wikipedia.org)
  • More generally, the term is often applied when species, even if known to be distinct, cannot be reliably distinguished based on their morphology. (wikipedia.org)
  • The term "grayling" is often used to refer generically to the Thymallus species, and T. thymallus is sometimes called the European grayling for clarity. (wikipedia.org)
  • The impacts of this species are difficult to determine because it is often lumped together with other species in the family. (michigan.gov)
  • definition
  • John Ray, an English naturalist, was the first to attempt a biological definition of species in 1686, as follows: No surer criterion for determining species has occurred to me than the distinguishing features that perpetuate themselves in propagation from seed. (wikipedia.org)
  • This leads to the formal definition of a combinatorial species. (wikipedia.org)
  • Obviously, the concept is closely tied to the definition of a species. (wikipedia.org)
  • Formal definition from the United States Environmental Protection Agency: A species that has been intentionally or inadvertently brought into a region or area. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, some sources add to that basic definition "and are now reproducing in the wild", which removes from consideration as introduced species that were raised or grown in gardens or farms that do not survive without tending by people. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to a practical definition, an invasive species is one that has been introduced and become a pest in its new location, spreading (invading) by natural means. (wikipedia.org)
  • The biological definition of invasive species, on the other hand, makes no reference to the harm they may cause, only to the fact that they spread beyond the area of original introduction. (wikipedia.org)
  • another
  • If as Linnaeus thought, species were fixed, there would be no problem, but evolutionary processes cause species to change continually, and to grade into one another. (wikipedia.org)
  • one species never springs from the seed of another nor vice versa. (wikipedia.org)
  • aegis would mean that this shell somewhat resembles the shell of Lucapina aegis, but is thought more likely to be another species, either closely related to, or closely resembling Lucapina aegis. (wikipedia.org)
  • The difference between one species and another is that they build a different set of structures out of the same base set. (wikipedia.org)
  • status
  • We identify and assess the status of imperiled species that may need protection under the ESA. (fws.gov)
  • plant
  • Two or more taxa once considered conspecific (of the same species) may later be subdivided into infraspecific taxa (taxa within a species, such as bacterial strains or plant varieties), but this is not a species complex. (wikipedia.org)