• larvae
  • Life-cycle is a complete metamorphosis with larvae that are non-parasitic, living in environments such as pools of water, soil, streams. (wikipedia.org)
  • Varroa mites have been found on Tricia larvae of some wasp species, such as Vespula vulgaris, and flower-feeding insects such as the bumblebee, Bombus pennsylvanicus, the scarab beetle, Phanaeus vindex, and the flower-fly, Palpada vinetorum. (wikipedia.org)
  • risks
  • Furthermore, the AVMA also does not support the use of nonhuman primates as assistance or service animals because of animal welfare concerns, the potential for serious injury, and zoonotic risks. (avma.org)
  • The risks posed to and by nonhuman primates maintained by private individuals fall into four broad categories: inadequate husbandry, physical injury to humans and other domestic animals, disease transmission, and ecosystem concerns. (avma.org)
  • African trypanosomiasis is a vector-borne parasitic disease causing serious risks to the lives of about 60 million people and 48 million cattle globally. (mdpi.com)
  • Wuchereria
  • When a new species (now called Brugia pahangi) was discovered in 1956 from dog and cat, J. J. C. Buckley and J. F. B. Edeson named it Wuchereria pahangi after the village Pahang in Malay, where it was discovered. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another species Wuchereria patei was described by Buckley, with G. S. Nelson and R. B. Heisch, in 1958. (wikipedia.org)
  • The ones that mainly occupy lymph vessels and cause conditions such as adenolyrophangitis, elephantiasis, and filarial fever are: Brugia malayi Brugia timori Wuchereria bancrofti Three other medically important parasitic species are: Loa loa causes Loa loa filariasis also known as Calabar swelling Mansonella streptocerca, which causes streptocerciasis, an itchy condition that creates depigmented skin lesions sometimes mistaken for the first signs of leprosy. (wikipedia.org)
  • adult
  • Humans (for B. malayi and B. timori), and animals (for B. pahangi and B. patei) acts as the definitive hosts in which the adult worms cause filariasis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dermacentor varia´bilis the chief vector of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in the central and eastern United States, the dog being the principal host of the adult forms, but also parasitic on cattle, horses, rabbits, and humans. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The dog is the principal host of the adult forms, but also parasitic on cattle, horses, rabbits and humans. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The adults suck the "blood" (hemolymph) of adult honey bees for sustenance, leaving open wounds and transmitting diseases and viruses. (wikipedia.org)
  • A cysticercoid is an inflated sphere with distinct rostellar hooks, and each species has characteristic number and size of the hooks, which correspond to those of adult worms. (wikipedia.org)
  • The adult flies are nocturnal, spending the day sheltering in dark humid places such as on bark, among foliage, among leaf litter, in animal burrows, in termite mounds, and in cracks and crevices. (wikipedia.org)
  • The adult life is spent in the intestine of fowl, which is the definitive host, and juvenile period is in ant, particularly the species of Tetramorium, which is the intermediate host. (wikipedia.org)
  • It must succeed in invading its vector organism fairly soon, because, unlike adult filarial worms, microfilariae only survive for a few months to a year or two depending on the species and they develop no further unless they are ingested by a suitable blood-feeding female insect. (wikipedia.org)
  • symptoms
  • Treatment is easier when the disease is detected early and before neurological symptoms occur. (wikipedia.org)
  • If left untreated, the disease overcomes the host's defenses and can cause more extensive damage, broadening symptoms to include anemia, endocrine, cardiac, and kidney dysfunctions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Stress can trigger symptoms in susceptible animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Symptoms are generally caused by the species Eimeria zuernii and Eimeria bovis and include loss of appetite, fatigue, dehydration, and watery, sometimes bloody, diarrhoea. (wikipedia.org)
  • went extinct
  • Of the six extinct species, five went extinct in the Quaternary extinction event. (wikipedia.org)
  • The scimitar oryx or scimitar-horned oryx (Oryx dammah), also known as the Sahara oryx, is a species of Oryx once widespread across North Africa which went extinct in the wild in 2000. (wikipedia.org)
  • veterinary
  • THE NETHERLANDS - Experts in animal and human health called on the medical, veterinary, public health and related healthcare communities to collaborate more closely to prevent and combat diseases, reports Zoetis. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • Anton Pijpers, professor of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Utrecht, said: "Animal health is also about human health and the linkage between the two is fundamental, whether we are talking about zoonotic diseases that can be passed between animals and people or chronic disease that affect people and animals alike. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • Alejandro Bernal, Executive Vice President and Area President, Europe, Africa and Middle East at Zoetis and Chairman of IFAH-Europe, the organisation representing manufacturers of veterinary medicines, vaccines and other animal health products in Europe, explained: "Detecting and controlling disease in animals should not only occur after human cases, which is too often the case, it should start when outbreaks of zoonotic diseases are first seen in animals. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • I am Dr. Gail Golab, Director of the American Veterinary Medical Association's Animal Welfare Division. (avma.org)
  • Find information on animal health topics, written for the veterinary professional. (merckvetmanual.com)
  • This article provides an overview of parasitic flies from a veterinary perspective, with emphasis on the disease causing relationships between these flies and their host animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • All species of veterinary and medical importance are blood feeders, with various types of mouthparts (these variations do not relate clearly to dipteran taxonomy). (wikipedia.org)
  • cattle
  • Thereafter, the family lineage of bison and taurine cattle does not appear to be a straightforward "tree" structure as is often depicted in much evolution, because evidence of interbreeding and crossbreeding is seen between different species and members within this family, even many millions of years after their ancestors separated into different species. (wikipedia.org)
  • Amphistomiasis or paramphistomiasis (alternatively spelled amphistomosis or paramphistomosis) is a parasitic disease of livestock animals, more commonly of cattle and sheep, and humans caused by immature helminthic flatworms belonging to the order Echinostomida. (wikipedia.org)
  • subspecies
  • The North American species is composed of two subspecies, the Plains bison, B. b. bison, and the Wood bison, B. b. athabascae, which is the namesake of Wood Buffalo National Park in Canada. (wikipedia.org)
  • In another study, intended to note genetic differences between Oryx species, karyotypes of Oryx species and subspecies - namely O. gazella, O. b. beisa, O. b. callotis, O. dammah and O. leucoryx - were compared with the standard karyotype of Bos taurus. (wikipedia.org)
  • outbreaks
  • The benefits of research on the ecology and evolution of infectious diseases include development of theories of how diseases are transmitted, improved understanding of unintended health effects of development projects, increased capacity to forecast disease outbreaks, and knowledge of how infectious diseases emerge and reemerge. (nsf.gov)
  • Still other grantees will study the ecological drivers of infectious disease evolution in an emerging avian pathogen, while others will link models and policy using adaptive management for optimal control of disease outbreaks. (nsf.gov)
  • clinical
  • provide a clinical experience with emphasis on programmed health care delivery for a flock or herd of animals. (ufl.edu)
  • In Nigeria, trypanosomiasis seems to be re-emerging as an important livestock disease, assuming major clinical importance in small ruminants and extending to previously designated tsetse-free zones [ 2 , 3 ]. (mdpi.com)
  • The level of their infection and clinical pathogenicity is characteristic of each species. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diagnosis basically relies on a combination of postmortem analyses, clinical signs displayed by the animals, and response to drenching. (wikipedia.org)
  • trypanosomiasis
  • African trypanosomiasis, also known as sleeping sickness, is an insect-borne parasitic disease of humans and other animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other animals, such as cows, may carry the disease and become infected in which case it is known as animal trypanosomiasis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Trypanosoma vivax ( T. vivax ), Trypanosoma congolense ( T. congolense ) and to a lesser extent Trypanosoma brucei brucei ( T. b. brucei ) are the main species responsible for African animal trypanosomosis (AAT) called nagana in West Africa while T. b. rhodesiense and T. b. gambiense cause sleeping sickness (human African trypanosomiasis, HAT). (mdpi.com)
  • wild
  • Ever expanding suburban development means more people are encroaching on dwindling natural reserves, bringing people and livestock in ever closer contact with wild animals. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • More than 60 per cent of all infectious diseases that plague mankind are of wild animal origin and 75 per cent of emerging human diseases are zoonotic 1,3 . (thepoultrysite.com)
  • Infection situation among domestic and wild animals. (ajtmh.org)
  • The data support this belief: according to the Captive Wild Animal Protection Coalition, 1 more than 80% of health and behavioral issues with nonhuman primates arise from those that are kept as pets. (avma.org)
  • AVMA policy, based on considerable research and deliberation, supports limiting or prohibiting private ownership of indigenous and non-native wild animals that pose a substantial risk to public health, domestic animal health, or the ecosystem, or whose welfare is unacceptably compromised. (avma.org)
  • 2 The AVMA thereby supports related regulatory efforts to limit or prohibit private ownership, and importation for the purpose of private ownership, of such indigenous and non-native wild animals. (avma.org)
  • Precise numbers are difficult to elucidate, but Born Free USA and the Captive Wild Animal Protection Coalition estimate 4 that more than 15,000 nonhuman primates are owned by private individuals in the United States today. (avma.org)
  • Changes of human habitation to suburban areas, increased use of lands for agricultural purposes, increased hunting activities and consumption of wild boar meat have increased the chances of exposure of wild boars to domestic animals and humans. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • Table 1 lists the viruses that are known to be prevalent in wild boars with potential for transmission to domestic animals and humans. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • The long-tailed goral or Amur goral (Naemorhedus caudatus) is a species of wild goat found in the mountains of eastern and northern Asia, including Russia, China, and Korea. (wikipedia.org)
  • In humans and wild animals, infection is not easily identified. (wikipedia.org)
  • exotic
  • Today, it is bred in captivity in special reserves in Tunisia, Morocco and Senegal and on private exotic animal ranches in the Texas Hill Country. (wikipedia.org)
  • infect humans
  • Mansonella ozzardi Mansonella perstans Mansonella semiclarum (now regarded as a synonym of Mansonella perstans) Some Dirofilaria species usually parasitize animals such as dogs, but occasionally infect humans as well. (wikipedia.org)
  • feces
  • In humans, the primary source of infection is through contact with the feces of infected animals, especially domestic cats (the animal within which Toxoplasma gondii can reproduce). (psypost.org)
  • The disease spreads from one animal to another by contact with infected feces or ingestion of infected tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • leptospirosis
  • In the urban slums of Brazil, other grantees will study the influence on human health of leptospirosis--a common disease transmitted to people from animals. (nsf.gov)
  • pathogens
  • Animal and plant diseases cause significant losses in food production around the globe, with some pathogens also causing food-borne illnesses in humans,' says Sonny Ramaswamy, director of USDA's National Institute of Food and Agriculture. (nsf.gov)