Loading...
  • water
  • This hormone increases the absorption of water in the collecting ducts of the kidneys so that water is conserved while sodium and other electrolytes are excreted in the urine. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • It is often associated with deficient fluid volume due to diarrhea or vomiting when water is replaced faster than sodium. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • An increase in the serum sodium concentration ( hypernatremia ) occurs when insensible water loss is not replaced by drinking, as in a comatose patient with diabetes insipidus. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • NaOH
  • Sodium hypobromite arises by treatment of aqueous solution of bromine with base: Br2 + 2 NaOH → NaBr + NaOBr + H2O It can be prepared in situ for use as a reagent, such as in the synthesis of 3-aminopyridine from nicotinamide. (wikipedia.org)
  • Potassium
  • Dietary reference intakes for water, potassium, sodium, chloride, and sulfate / Panel on Dietary Reference Intakes for Electrolytes and Water, Standing Committee on the Scientific Evaluation of Dietary Reference Intakes, Food and Nutrition Board. (nap.edu)
  • Sodium, along with other electrolytes such as potassium , chloride , and bicarbonate (or total CO 2 ) , helps cells function normally and helps regulate the amount of fluid in the body. (labtestsonline.org)
  • Potassium sodium tartrate tetrahydrate , also known as Rochelle salt , is a double salt of tartaric acid first prepared (in about 1675) by an apothecary , Pierre Seignette , of La Rochelle , France . (wikipedia.org)
  • Potassium sodium tartrate and monopotassium phosphate were the first materials discovered to exhibit piezoelectricity . (wikipedia.org)
  • Sodium Potassium tartrate is also important in the food industry. (wikipedia.org)
  • comparing ion concentrations across the cell membrane, inside to outside, potassium measures about 40:1, and sodium, about 1:10. (wikipedia.org)
  • Due to having low atomic mass and large atomic radius, sodium is third-least dense of all elemental metals and is one of only three metals that can float on water, the other two being lithium and potassium. (wikipedia.org)
  • The melting (98 °C) and boiling (883 °C) points of sodium are lower than those of lithium but higher than those of the heavier alkali metals potassium, rubidium, and caesium, following periodic trends down the group. (wikipedia.org)
  • White phosphorus is reduced by sodium-potassium alloy: P4 + 12 Na → 4 Na3P Phosphorus reacts with sodium in an autoclave at 150 °C for 5 hours to produce Na3P. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1963
  • Sodium (1963-1983) was an Irish-bred, British-trained Thoroughbred racehorse and sire best known for winning the classic St Leger Stakes in 1966. (wikipedia.org)
  • alkali
  • Sodium is an alkali metal, being in group 1 of the periodic table, because it has a single electron in its outer shell that it readily donates, creating a positively charged ion-the Na+ cation. (wikipedia.org)
  • The preparation of this salt involves oxidizing a mixture of Bi2O3 and Na2O with air (as the source of O2): Na2O + O2 + Bi2O3 → 2 NaBiO3 The procedure is analogous to the preparation oxidation of manganese dioxide in alkali to give sodium manganate. (wikipedia.org)
  • In geochemical analysis, sodium cobaltinitrite is used to distinguish alkali feldspars from plagioclase feldspars in thin section. (wikipedia.org)
  • situ
  • The standard redox potential of sodium persulfate into hydrogen sulfate is 2.1 V, which is higher than that of hydrogen peroxide (1.8 V) but lower than ozone (2.2 V). The sulfate radical formed in situ has a standard electrode potential of 2.7 V. It is mainly used as a radical initiator for emulsion polymerization reactions for styrene based polymers such as Acrylonitrile butadiene styrene. (wikipedia.org)
  • acid
  • Moreover, although the lactic-acid starter culture to ferment corn or beets may contain milk, sodium lactate does not contain milk protein and need not be restricted by someone avoiding milk or those with a milk allergy. (wikipedia.org)
  • The selenous acid is neutralized to form sodium selenite. (wikipedia.org)
  • Protonation of sodium thiocyanate affords isothiocyanic acid, S=C=NH (pKa = −1.28). (wikipedia.org)
  • The use of erythorbic acid and sodium erythorbate as a food preservative has increased greatly since the U.S. Food and Drug Administration banned the use of sulfites as preservatives in foods intended to be eaten fresh (such as ingredients for fresh salads) and as food processors have responded to the fact that some people are allergic to sulfites. (wikipedia.org)
  • The mechanism of sodium stibogluconate is poorly understood, but is thought to stem from the inhibition of macromolecular synthesis via a reduction in available ATP and GTP, likely secondary to inhibition of the citric acid cycle and glycolysis. (wikipedia.org)
  • oxide
  • Sodium at standard temperature and pressure is a soft silvery metal that combines with oxygen in air and forms grayish white sodium oxide unless immersed in oil or inert gas, which are the conditions it is usually stored in. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sodium methoxide is used as an initiator of anionic addition polymerization with ethylene oxide, forming a polyether with high molecular weight. (wikipedia.org)
  • Methoxide
  • Sodium methoxide is a chemical compound with the formula CH3ONa. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sodium methoxide is prepared by carefully treating methanol with sodium: 2 Na + 2 CH 3OH → 2 CH 3ONa + H 2 The reaction is so exothermic that ignition is possible. (wikipedia.org)
  • The resulting solution, which is colorless, is often used as a source of sodium methoxide, but the pure material can be isolated by evaporation followed by heating to remove residual methanol. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the solid form, sodium methoxide is polymeric, with sheet-like arrays of Na+ centers, each bonded to four oxygen centers. (wikipedia.org)
  • The structure, and hence the basicity, of sodium methoxide in solution depends on the solvent. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sodium methoxide is a routinely used base in organic chemistry, applicable to the synthesis of numerous compounds ranging from pharmaceuticals to agrichemicals. (wikipedia.org)
  • This transformation is catalyzed by sodium methoxide. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sodium methoxide is highly caustic and reacts with water to give methanol, which is toxic and volatile. (wikipedia.org)
  • Alkoxide Methoxide Biodiesel production Sodium ethoxide E. Weiss (1964). (wikipedia.org)
  • bicarbonate
  • It also can be given intravenously as a source of bicarbonate for preventing or controlling mild to moderate metabolic acidosis in patients with restricted oral intake (for sodium bicarbonate) whose oxidative processes are not seriously impaired. (wikipedia.org)
  • Everything you need to understand or teach Sodium bicarbonate . (bookrags.com)
  • Sodium Bicarbonate Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) is a white crystalline powder commonly known to as baking soda. (bookrags.com)
  • selenate
  • Sodium selenate is the inorganic compound with the formula Na 2SeO 4, not to be confused with sodium selenite. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although the selenates are much more toxic, many physical properties of sodium selenate and sodium sulfate are similar. (wikipedia.org)
  • The sodium selenite is oxidized in a basic medium hydrogen peroxide to form a selenate, which is then spray-dried. (wikipedia.org)
  • One of the earliest applications of sodium selenate was in the glass industry. (wikipedia.org)
  • Selenium produces a red hue in glass The molten glass is treated with sodium selenate and then arsenic trioxide to reduce the compound and provide elemental selenium. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sodium selenate is also used as a decolorizing agent in glass production. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sodium selenate is a common ingredient in some insecticides used against mites, aphids, and mealybugs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sodium selenate is effectively used for bio-fortification of crops hence fortifying food/feed to mitigate selenium deficiency in humans and livestock. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chosen for its selenium content and high solubility, sodium selenate is a common ingredient in over-the-counter vitamin supplements. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sodium selenate and selenite are also common in premix animal feed. (wikipedia.org)
  • The U.S. FDA and European Union currently classify sodium selenate as toxic, primarily if ingested or inhaled. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chronic exposure to sodium selenate can cause severe lung, kidney, and liver damage. (wikipedia.org)
  • toxic
  • citation needed] Sodium phosphide is highly dangerous releasing toxic phosphine upon hydrolysis, a process that is so exothermic that fires result. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sodium stibogluconate is exceedingly toxic to veins. (wikipedia.org)
  • dihydrate
  • AX33 twelve 30 g test samples of sodium tartrate dihydrate. (scaleman.com)
  • The chemical starts as sodium tartrate to which two molecules of water are bonded making it a dihydrate. (scaleman.com)
  • After preheating the analyzer, the data can be obtained with approximately 5 g test sample (Sodium tartrate dihydrate) in standard mode (MID. (scaleman.com)
  • AND Weighing moisture analyzers MS-70 MX-50 and MF-50 so with two (2) test samples of sodium tartrate dihydrate when you purchase a new moisture analyze. (scaleman.com)
  • The AND ML-50 moisture balances does not come with any test samples of sodium tartrate dihydrate and must be purchased as an optional accessory. (scaleman.com)
  • Sodium orthovanadate is the inorganic compound with the chemical formula Na3VO4·2H2O (sodium orthovanadate dihydrate). (wikipedia.org)
  • inhibits
  • The current literature suggests that cannabidiol inhibits sodium currents primarily through altering the biophysical properties of cell membrane, promoting the inactivated conformation of * sodium channels . (wikipedia.org)
  • Abbott Laboratories
  • Prior to 1973, Abbott Laboratories produced sodium cyclamate (Sucaryl) by a mixture of ingredients including the addition of pure sodium (flakes or rods suspended in kerosene) with cyclohexylamine, chilled and filtered through a high speed centrifugal separator, dried, granulated and micro-pulverised for powder or tablet usage. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sodium thiopental , also known as Sodium Pentothal (a trademark of Abbott Laboratories , not to be confused with pentobarbital ), thiopental , thiopentone , or Trapanal (also a trademark), is a rapid-onset short-acting barbiturate general anesthetic that is an analogue of thiobarbital . (wikipedia.org)
  • ionic
  • Natriummonothiophosphat(V): Kristallstruktur und Natriumionenleitfähigkeit" [Sodium monothiophosphate(V). Crystal structure and sodium ionic conductivity]. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1972
  • Experientia, 1972,28, 53 (pharmacol) Sodium lignosulfonate is also known by the following names. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sodium was sold again in 1972 and was sent to Japan, where he had little success before his death in 1983. (wikipedia.org)
  • cyanide
  • Despite the presence of the cyanide ligands , sodium ferrocyanide has low toxicity (acceptable daily intake 0-0.025 mg/kg body weight ). (wikipedia.org)
  • decreases
  • Sodium thiopental decreases the cardiac stroke volume , which results in a decrease in cardiac output . (wikipedia.org)
  • Isotonic loss of water and sodium from the ECF compartment decreases the size of that compartment in a condition called ECF hypovolemia. (wikipedia.org)
  • chemically
  • Despite the similarity in name, sodium lactate is not chemically similar to lactose (milk sugar), so need not be restricted by those with lactose intolerance . (wikipedia.org)
  • calcium
  • Calcium has been shown to block sodium channels which explains the effects of hypercalcemia and hypocalcemia . (wikipedia.org)
  • dose
  • A normal dose of sodium thiopental (usually 4-6 mg/kg) given to a pregnant woman for operative delivery ( caesarian section ) rapidly makes her unconscious, but the baby in her uterus remains conscious. (wikipedia.org)
  • The dose of sodium stibogluconate is by slow intravenous infusion (at least five minutes with cardiac monitoring). (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • In its hydrous form, Na 4 Fe(CN) 6 · 10 H 2 O (sodium ferrocyanide decahydrate), it is sometimes known as yellow prussiate of soda . (wikipedia.org)
  • Sodium aurothiomalate (INN, known in the United States as gold sodium thiomalate) is a gold compound that is used for its immunosuppressive anti-rheumatic effects. (wikipedia.org)
  • Twenty isotopes of sodium are known, but only 23Na is stable. (wikipedia.org)
  • Water
  • In older literature, stannates are sometimes represented as having the simple oxyanion SnO32−, in which case this compound is sometimes named as sodium stannate-3-water and represented as Na2SnO3·3H2O, a hydrate with three waters of crystallisation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Loss of water from the ECF compartment increases the sodium concentration, a condition called hypernatremia. (wikipedia.org)