• bouts
  • Before their research, the most recent mention in published research was a letter to the Journal of the American Medical Association in 1972, which involved a 69-year-old man who had bouts of severe sneezing after orgasm. (wikipedia.org)
  • violently
  • Before he can request assistance, the uncle sneezes violently again, which knocks over the policeman and a lamppost, as well as causing damage to a house. (wikipedia.org)
  • to comics historian Thierry Smolderen, "The reading of these pages is most enjoyable not in the repetitive buildup of the sneeze itself, but in the beautifully varied and fleshed out description of the human activities that are so violently interrrupted by the explosion. (wikipedia.org)
  • reflex
  • Sneezing cannot occur during sleep due to REM atonia - a bodily state wherein motor neurons are not stimulated and reflex signals are not relayed to the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • The neural regions involved in the sneeze reflex are located in the brainstem along the ventromedial part of the spinal trigeminal nucleus and the adjacent pontine-medullary lateral reticular formation. (wikipedia.org)
  • The sneeze reflex involves contraction of a number of different muscles and muscle groups throughout the body, typically including the eyelids. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dr. Mahmood Bhutta, an otorhinolaryngologist at John Radcliffe Hospital, states that sexually induced sneezing may be genetically determined, and may result from the way the central nervous system is wired: "[T]his reflex demonstrates evolutionary relics in the wiring of a part of the nervous system called the autonomic nervous system. (wikipedia.org)
  • mucous
  • The signal is interpreted in the trigeminal nerve nuclei, and an efferent signal goes to different parts of the body, such as mucous glands and the diaphragm, thus producing a sneeze. (wikipedia.org)
  • achoo
  • Walking out of a dark building into sunshine may trigger PSR, or the ACHOO (autosomal dominant compulsive helio-ophthalmic outbursts of sneezing) syndrome as it's also called. (wikipedia.org)
  • harmless
  • Photic sneezes are harmless annoyances for the most part, but can pose physical risk to people who are operating vehicles or machinery that involve precise movement and reactions. (wikipedia.org)
  • people
  • About 1 out of every 3 people sneezes when exposed to bright light. (kidshealth.org)
  • Most people have some sensitivity to light that can trigger a sneeze. (kidshealth.org)
  • Some cultures believe that the soul leaves the body for an instant when you sneeze and so people around you will say, "Bless you", "God bless you to keep you safe", or "Good health" in whatever language they speak. (cyh.com)
  • Nevertheless, many people will want to stop a sneeze for various reasons, including the world record holder who, according to The Guinness Book of World Records, had a sneezing fit for 977 days, and produced more than a million sneezes. (wikihow.com)
  • Sometimes the signals in this system get crossed, and I think this may be why some people sneeze when they think about sex. (wikipedia.org)
  • cultures
  • Some cultures believe that sneezing is a sign of good luck. (cyh.com)
  • Some Asian cultures believed that sneezing was a sign that someone was talking about you behind your back. (cyh.com)
  • In some Asian cultures such as Chinese, Korean, Vietnamese and Japanese cultures, the practice of responding to another person's sneeze does not exist. (wikipedia.org)
  • commonly
  • In English-speaking countries, the common verbal response to another person's sneeze is "God bless you", or, less commonly in the United States and Canada, "Gesundheit", the German word for health (and the response to sneezing in German-speaking countries). (wikipedia.org)
  • throat
  • The powerful nature of a sneeze is attributed to its involvement of numerous organs of the upper body - it is a reflexive response involving the face, throat, and chest muscles. (wikipedia.org)
  • stimulation
  • The stimulation may stop the sneeze from materializing. (wikihow.com)
  • Stimulation of the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve may enhance the irritability of the maxillary branch, resulting in an increased probability of sneezing. (wikipedia.org)
  • always close your
  • Did you know that you always close your eyes when you sneeze? (kidshealth.org)
  • Actually when you sneeze you always close your eyes - but that is not because your eyes might pop out - eyes are held in place by very strong muscles and they cannot pop out, so don't worry! (cyh.com)
  • eyes
  • Well to help you finish the sneeze with a big "Chooo" try looking at the light from a light bulb - not the sun as you could damage your eyes. (cyh.com)
  • When I sneeze my eyes always water too. (cyh.com)
  • During a reverse sneeze, your dog will make rapid inspirations, stand still with his elbows spread apart, extend his head, and his eyes may bulge. (petplace.com)
  • There is a possibility that sensory input from the eyes could travel to the neurons in the cortex that interpret such signals, but neighboring neurons which are involved in sneezing are also activated, due to the generalization. (wikipedia.org)
  • A young boy by the name of Thomas, accidentally enters a fantastic, magical world full of unexpected occurrences and wondrous sights by sneezing with his eyes open, and now must enlist the aid of strange creatures to help him find his way home again. (wikipedia.org)
  • doctors
  • An Italian labourer seriously impressed doctors by sneezing out a .22 bullet he'd accidentally picked up during lively New Year's Eve celebrations in Naples. (theregister.co.uk)
  • work
  • The sneeze center then sends a message to all the muscles that have to work together to create the amazingly complicated process that we call the sneeze. (kidshealth.org)
  • Call your health care provider if sneezing is affecting your life and home remedies do not work. (northside.com)
  • This is a pressure point that some grab to stop a headache, and it can work with sneezes, too. (wikihow.com)
  • result
  • The person experiences sneezing as a result of sexual thoughts, arousal, intercourse, or orgasm. (wikipedia.org)
  • If this increased sensitivity occurred in the maxillary branch instead of the ophthalmic branch, a sneeze could result instead of photophobia. (wikipedia.org)
  • An explanation for the piece given by Duchamp involves the coldness of the marble cubes, the "heat-giving" properties of the sugar cubes, the thermometer evaluating temperature, and the sneezing that can result from cold. (wikipedia.org)
  • muscles
  • This region appears to control the epipharyngeal, intrinsic laryngeal and respiratory muscles, and the combined activity of these muscles serve as the basis for the generation of a sneeze. (wikipedia.org)
  • itself
  • Once I get going, the problem feeds on itself, so the more I sneeze, the more irritated my nasal passages get, to the point where I can't really function. (medhelp.org)
  • long
  • If you have a cold - a sneeze can spread germs a very long way (over a metre). (cyh.com)
  • cause
  • Sufficient external stimulants, however, may cause a person to wake from their sleep for the purpose of sneezing, although any sneezing occurring afterwards would take place with a partially awake status at minimum. (wikipedia.org)