• prey
  • The mighty T. rex may have thrashed its massive head from side to side to dismember prey, but a new study shows that its smaller cousin Allosaurus was a more dexterous hunter and tugged at prey more like a modern-day falcon. (phys.org)
  • A researcher wondered if a bat's head waggles and ear wiggles were related to its search for prey. (newswise.com)
  • Still photos depict a single cycle of a bat's head waggle, intended to help it to focus its hearing and zero in on prey. (newswise.com)
  • Related video here Kill Them with Cuteness: The Adorable Thing Bats Do to Catch Prey A Johns Hopkins University researcher noticed the bats he works with cocked their heads to the side, just like his pet pug. (newswise.com)
  • They found the head waggles, about one per second, occurred when the insect prey changed direction or moved erratically. (newswise.com)
  • Most notably, these head and ear movements coordinated with the bat's vocalizations, on a millisecond time scale, allowing the animal to pinpoint prey with considerably more accuracy. (newswise.com)
  • knees
  • The notation, which shows movements of head, shoulders, hips, knees and feet on five lines similar to music notation, is according to experts still the most precise representation of ballet even in the time of video, offering also the possibility of synchronization with the music. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many sufferers show consistent symptoms including: body rocking, where the whole body is moved while on the hands and knees. (wikipedia.org)
  • gaze
  • We have analyzed a possibility to realize such a user interaction solution using gaze tracking and concluded that remote calibration free eye tracking is still a subject of academic research, but that head tracking could be used instead. (epfl.ch)
  • We show large variability in head movement and that per individual the gaze-head data could well be approximated with a straight line. (epfl.ch)
  • Based on these results we propose a new solution that enables natural gaze interaction by means of head tracking. (epfl.ch)
  • differences
  • The differences are not obvious to untrained observers, but appropriate measures show that they exist. (infomus.org)
  • Results show that a shortened quality of experience questionnaire was still able to distinguish between performances when ranked by preference and that subjective and physiological continuous measures showed differences within and between performances. (infomus.org)
  • typically
  • Co-author Cynthia F. Moss , a Johns Hopkins professor and neuroscientist, said other studies on how animals and humans localize sound sources missed the importance of head waggles and ear movements, because laboratories typically observe the subject with a fixed head position. (newswise.com)
  • body
  • Munguia looked a weight class bigger than Cook and started off as the more aggressive fighter, landing combinations to the body and head early on. (boxinginsider.com)
  • Munguia opened up the third round with heavy digging hooks to the body, and knocked Cook down after a body head combination, including a punch that landed as Cook was falling to the mat. (boxinginsider.com)
  • study
  • Cranko sent her to study the Benesh Movement Notation in London, which she completed in 1966. (wikipedia.org)
  • The researchers used a novel method to study the head waggles and ear movements of the big brown bat, a common bat species that in the wild hunts in both open and cluttered spaces. (newswise.com)
  • De Tolnay in 1935 published his observation that the fibula in the sculpture is a study for the sculpture itself, providing a missing link to show the resemblance to classical coinage. (wikipedia.org)
  • senses
  • The finding, published Thursday by the open access journal PLOS Biology , demonstrates how movement can enhance signals used by senses like sight and hearing - not just in bats, but in dogs and cats, and even in humans. (newswise.com)
  • muscles
  • Halteres act as a balance and guidance system by providing rapid feedback to the wing-steering muscles, as well as those responsible for stabilizing the head. (wikipedia.org)
  • real
  • As the head turns it becomes more real and solid, going from a mass of blurred lines on the left to being almost photo-realistic on the right. (wikipedia.org)
  • That's not at all how bats or other animals operate in the real world, when their heads are free to move, not restrained. (newswise.com)
  • The automaton also makes some of the movements that a real player would do, such as balancing the torso. (wikipedia.org)
  • significant
  • During the investigation, he also claimed that the assailant tried to reach for a knife that was 'within reach' of him, while the documentation in the video showed the knife was a significant distance away from the assailant, who was critically injured. (wikipedia.org)
  • measure
  • The markers allowed the team to precisely measure the head and ear positions as bats tracked worms moving in various directions. (newswise.com)
  • video
  • In the eastern Georgian region of Kvemo Kartli, a video surreptitiously taken with a mobile phone showed election commission officials accompanying citizens into voting booths as they cast their ballots. (rferl.org)
  • Rhythmic Movement Disorder is observed using the standard procedure for polysomnography, which includes video recording, EEG during sleep, EMG, and ECG. (wikipedia.org)
  • corner
  • While most of these are human heads, there are other animals, such as those climbing down the window frame on the south-west corner of the tower. (wikipedia.org)
  • power
  • As such, Radio Werewolf claimed that their sound was part of a musical purist movement, designed to evoke feelings of power and harmony through the use of the "dominant frequency" which lead vocalist Nikolas Schreck described in the liner notes of the 1989 Radio Werewolf album The Fiery Summons as sonic magic. (wikipedia.org)
  • requires
  • We argue that conventional use of head tracking requires conscious intentional head movements and thus does not fit into the context of applications such as the ISW. (epfl.ch)
  • different
  • Many people think of Allosaurus as a smaller and earlier version of T. rex , but our engineering analyses show that they were very different predators. (phys.org)
  • hand
  • The draughtsman works by using a system of cams that code the movements of the hand in two dimensions, plus one to lift the pencil. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although
  • Although the epi-centre of the movement was Lalgarh, it was spread across 19 police stations in three adjoining districts - Paschim Medinipur, Bankura and Purulia, all thickly forested and near the border with Jharkhand. (wikipedia.org)
  • The majority of RMD episodes occur during NREM sleep, although REM movements have been reported. (wikipedia.org)
  • feet
  • Aurelio flips his opponent over his head, and the fight looks to be close to a finish, but Dunham again escapes to his feet as the crowd erupts. (sherdog.com)
  • activity
  • Since its origins it has been linked to grazing, activity for showing special aptitude, but today it has become very important as pet. (wikipedia.org)
  • RMD patients often show no abnormal activity that is directly the result of the disorder in an MRI scan. (wikipedia.org)
  • team
  • Allosaurus , however, had a relatively very light head, which the team discovered as they restored the soft tissues and air sinuses. (phys.org)
  • But lead author Wohlgemuth and his team are the first to show how the head and ear movements factor into the hunt. (newswise.com)
  • various
  • He has had 97 one-man-shows in various countries in addition to participating in numerous group shows. (wikipedia.org)
  • The movement was started by the Board of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian Church in December 1918, when it invited the various Protestant denominations to send representatives to a meeting in New York to confer upon the need for co-operation among the churches. (wikipedia.org)
  • common
  • The result of the conference was the launching of the Interchurch World Movement with the object not of any organic union of the denominations but the attempt to see how much could be done effectively in common. (wikipedia.org)
  • a combination of the aforementioned symptoms The majority of sufferers have symptoms that involve the head, and the most common symptom is head banging. (wikipedia.org)
  • eyes
  • One of the things that first drew my attention to how Master Yang Zhenduo looked was the way he used his head and eyes, which was more than just 'forcelessly. (yangfamilytaichi.com)
  • Movements of her chest show her "breathing", and she follows her fingers with her head and eyes. (wikipedia.org)
  • His eyes follow the text being written, and his head moves when he takes some ink. (wikipedia.org)
  • help
  • Using high-tech recording devices, Wohlgemuth determined that a bat's fetching head waggles and ear wiggles synch with the animal's sonar vocalizations to help it hunt. (newswise.com)
  • left
  • The force exerted on the halteres in response to this left right movement is known as Coriolis force and can be produced when any moving object is rotated in the three directions of rotation, yaw, pitch or roll (see figure). (wikipedia.org)
  • face
  • May also appear erect, observing then a tendency to keep them folded to any stimulus, showing its inner face. (wikipedia.org)
  • rather
  • Bené showed that hummingbirds learned about colours, rather than innately favouring red as previously believed [ 3 ], and described the key role that location plays in hummingbird memory. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • political
  • Baykam is one of the pioneers of the New Expressionism movement and of multi-media and photo-painting oriented political art. (wikipedia.org)
  • The movement was not just a political struggle but an armed struggle that concurrently took the look of a social struggle. (wikipedia.org)
  • time
  • At the same time, Saakashvili desperately needed his party, the United National Movement, to score a definitive win. (rferl.org)
  • effort
  • The Interchurch World Movement was an attempt to unite some of the main enterprises of the Protestant churches, so as to avoid duplication of effort and waste of funds. (wikipedia.org)