• systemic
  • Septic shock is a result of a systemic response to infection or multiple infectious causes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sepsis or septic shock is systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) secondary to a documented infection (see Shock Classification, Terminology, and Staging). (medscape.com)
  • Medical literature states that Endotoxin (a structural molecule of the Gram-negative bacteria extracellular membrane) is able to activate target cells such as macrophages and neutrophils, inducing them to produce and release cytokine, nitric oxide and other mediators that cause a systemic inflammatory response that can evolve until to endothelial damage, shock and multi-organ failure (MOF). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • genomic
  • With the failure of a 'one size fits all' approach, UQ researchers are collaborating with The George Institute for Global Health to create a genomic resource to help develop personalised treatment options for septic shock. (edu.au)
  • clinical
  • Decades of basic science and clinical research indicate that complement factors are involved in septic shock. (hindawi.com)
  • The study hypothesizes that there are 'golden hours' in the initial management of septic shock where prompt, rigorous, standardized care can improve clinical outcomes. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Definitions for the sepsis continuum and treatment algorithms specific for premature neonates are needed to improve studies of septic shock and assess benefit from clinical interventions. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Treating
  • WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Two new studies on the treatment of septic shock question the conventional wisdom of treating with corticosteroids, intensive insulin therapy or with the synthetic fluid replacement substance called pentastarch. (bio-medicine.org)
  • organ failure
  • Septic shock may lead to multiple organ failure and death. (winchesterhospital.org)
  • The purpose of this observational study is to determine whether endotoxin levels and/or their trends can be considered predictive of morbility or mortality in septic shock caused by gram-negative bacteria, searching also for a possible correlation with Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS II), Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA), White Blood Cells (WBC) and Platelets (PLT). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Detrimental
  • It is unknown whether excessive activation of these three upstream complement pathways may contribute to the detrimental effects in septic shock. (hindawi.com)
  • kidneys
  • If septic shock damages your kidneys, you may need dialysis. (cancer.ca)
  • Other sites involved in septic metastasis and abscess formation are the muscles and soft tissues, liver, spleen, kidneys and nervous system (intracranial abscesses, meningitis). (wikipedia.org)
  • blood
  • Low blood pressure reduces tissue perfusion pressure, causing the tissue hypoxia that is characteristic of shock. (wikipedia.org)
  • People with cancers of the blood, such as leukemia, are more likely to develop septic shock than those with solid tumours. (cancer.ca)
  • The drop in blood pressure seen in sepsis may lead to shock. (wikipedia.org)
  • lungs
  • As a consequence, the most frequently involved site of septic metastases are the lungs, followed by the joints (knee, hip, sternoclavicular joint, shoulder and elbow). (wikipedia.org)
  • people
  • Septic shock affects 15,000 people per year in Australia, plus millions worldwide, and so any treatment improvements will make a significant difference to recovery and quality of life. (edu.au)
  • Septic shock is more common in infants and in people over 50 years old. (winchesterhospital.org)
  • German researchers recruited 537 people in septic shock and randomly assigned them to receive either intensive insulin therapy or standard insulin therapy or a modified Ringer's lactate solution versus a pentastarch solution. (bio-medicine.org)
  • pathways
  • The involvement of three upstream complement pathways in septic shock is more complicated. (hindawi.com)
  • Both the classical and alternative pathways appear to be activated in septic shock, but the alternative pathway may be activated earlier than the classical pathway. (hindawi.com)
  • refers
  • Lemierre's syndrome (or Lemierre's disease, also known as postanginal shock including sepsis and human necrobacillosis) refers to infectious thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein. (wikipedia.org)
  • medical
  • RNCHAMPS (pronounced "R, N, champs") is a mnemonic acronym used by some medical professionals to recall the types of shock. (wikipedia.org)
  • Its utility in distinguishing types of shock has been discussed in medical literature and reference material concerning emergency medicine, emergency medical services, fire rescue, and specialized courses such as the Comprehensive Advanced Life Support Program. (wikipedia.org)
  • decades
  • In any case, the use of corticosteroids in septic shock has remained controversial for decades, and numerous studies have been conducted, often with conflicting results. (bio-medicine.org)
  • colleagues
  • A sleep-inducing neuropeptide can also inhibit lethal septic shock, according to Gonzalez-Rey and colleagues on page 563 . (rupress.org)
  • Gonzalez-Rey and colleagues now show that cortistatin treatment shuts down the synthesis of cytokines and inflammatory mediators by macrophages and protects mice against septic shock. (rupress.org)