• aphasia
  • Apraxia of speech, or difficulty speaking when there is no paralysis or weakness of speech muscles, and Anomia, the characteristic of aphasia that makes it hard to name objects. (tbilaw.com)
  • BPO, and BPO measures particularly, are notable in that they have proven useful in studying cognition (e.g. language development, developmental psychology), and in identifying - and to a limited degree, in treating - cognitive impairment (e.g. aphasia, apraxia, schizophrenia etc. (wikipedia.org)
  • The DSM IV lists the following criteria for the diagnosis of Korsakoff's Syndrome: anterograde amnesia Variable presentation of retrograde amnesia One of: Aphasia Apraxia Agnosia A deficit in executive functions In addition, the DSM-IV indicates that normal activities and function will be impaired by the memory deficits and that the experience of amnesia must occur outside of times where the individual is in a state of delirium, intoxification, or withdrawal. (wikipedia.org)
  • lesions
  • There are a variety of brain areas where lesions have been correlated to ideomotor apraxia. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, included in studies were individuals with severe right hemisphere lesions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although constructional apraxia can result from lesions in any part of the brain, it is most commonly associated with lesions in the parietal-occipital lobes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Manifestations may include enlarged spleen and liver, liver malfunction, skeletal disorders or bone lesions that may be painful, severe neurological complications, swelling of lymph nodes and (occasionally) adjacent joints, distended abdomen, a brownish tint to the skin, anemia, low blood platelet count, and yellow fatty deposits on the white of the eye (sclera). (wikipedia.org)
  • understood
  • Apraxia is a neurological disability that impacts the child's ability to follow a direction in spite of the directive being understood, a desire to follow the directive, the physical ability to follow the directive and sometimes, a previously shown ability to follow the directive. (blogspot.com)
  • It teaches them that if they don't comply with a directive (regardless of if they understood it or if apraxia stood in their way) we will make them comply with the directive. (blogspot.com)
  • dementia
  • Although there is no sign of mental retardation or severe dementia, even after long disease duration, research on families with possible AOA2 have shown mild cognitive impairment as indexed by the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and the Mattis Dementia Rating Scale. (wikipedia.org)
  • Syndrome
  • However, when it comes to children with severe apraxia, with or without coexisting anxiety, (Rett Syndrome, Angelman Syndrome, ASD, etc) the commonly used prompting hierarchy can complicate instead of simplify teaching augmentative and alternative communication. (blogspot.com)
  • The most frequent cause of complete Bálint's syndrome is said by some to be sudden and severe hypotension, resulting in bilateral borderzone infarction in the occipito-parietal region. (wikipedia.org)
  • motor
  • Ideomotor apraxia is hypothesized to result from a disruption of the system that relates stored tool use and gesture information with the state of the body to produce the proper motor output. (wikipedia.org)
  • Based on these remarkable observations, Goldstein developed a "doctrine of motor apraxia" in which he discussed the process involved in the generation of voluntary action and interpreted these findings in the context of a proposed central structure organized around the perception and internal representation of the space-time continuum encompassing memory, will, and other higher cognitive processes. (blogspot.com)
  • Constructional apraxia cannot be localized to a specific hemisphere or cerebral area because drawing and constructional tasks require both perceptual and motor functioning. (wikipedia.org)
  • Proponents of FC claim that motor issues (e.g., the neurological condition of apraxia) prevent people with autism from communicating effectively. (wikipedia.org)
  • amnesia
  • IA has been described under several names such as, agnosia of utilization, conceptual apraxia or loss of knowledge about the use of tools, or semantic amnesia of tool usage. (wikipedia.org)
  • difficulties
  • This patient presented with severe expressive difficulties, but following CVS was briefly able to produce full sentences using appropriate emotion and intonation. (frontiersin.org)
  • People
  • People suffering from ideomotor apraxia will know what they are supposed to do, e.g. they will know to wave goodbye and what their arm and hand should do to accomplish it, but will be unable to execute the motion correctly. (wikipedia.org)
  • Facilitated communication (FC), or supported typing, is a discredited technique used by some caregivers and educators in an attempt to assist people with severe educational and communication disabilities. (wikipedia.org)
  • Facilitated communication is promoted as a means to assist people with severe communication disabilities in pointing to letters on an alphabet board, keyboard or other device so that they can communicate independently. (wikipedia.org)
  • type
  • Furthermore, such demanding/testing type interactions increase anxiety (fear of getting it wrong, fear of disappointing, etc), oppositional behavior (the child's desire to prove that the he or she has power) and apraxia. (blogspot.com)
  • GD type I (non-neuropathic) is the most common and least severe form of the disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • common
  • Ideomotor apraxia (IMA) impinges on one's ability to carry out common, familiar actions on command, such as waving goodbye. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most common cause of ideomotor apraxia is a unilateral ischemic lesion to the brain, which is damage to one hemisphere of the brain due to a disruption of the blood supply, as in a stroke. (wikipedia.org)
  • form
  • Initially it was believed that damage to the subcortical white matter tracts, the axons that extend down from the cells bodies in the cerebral cortex, was the main area responsible for this form of apraxia. (wikipedia.org)
  • However
  • By the definition of apraxia, AOS affects volitional (willful or purposeful) movement patterns, however AOS usually also affects automatic speech. (wikipedia.org)
  • move
  • If this were repeated in a patient with ideomotor apraxia, the patient may move the comb in big circles around his head, hold it upside-down, or perhaps try and brush his teeth with it. (wikipedia.org)
  • late
  • The general concept of apraxia and the classification of ideomotor apraxia were developed in Germany in the late 19th and early 20th centuries by the work of Hugo Liepmann, Adolph Kussmaul, Arnold Pick, Paul Flechsig, Hermann Munk, Carl Nothnagel, Theodor Meynert, and linguist Heymann Steinthal, among others. (wikipedia.org)