• weakness
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is one of the hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) disorders, a group of genetically based disorders characterized by progressive motor weakness, decreased nerve conduction velocities, and nerve root enlargement ( 1 ). (ajnr.org)
  • CMT disease represents type I HMSN, a heterogeneous group of disorders of autosomal dominant inheritance characterized by distal muscle weakness, hypoactive or absent tendon reflexes, significantly decreased motor nerve conduction velocities, and hypertrophic onion-bulb changes on nerve biopsy. (ajnr.org)
  • Dancing Doberman disease progresses over a few years to rear leg weakness and muscle atrophy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other conditions that can cause facial weakness include brain tumor, stroke, Ramsay Hunt syndrome, and Lyme disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • inner ear
  • At Lancaster General Health, the Gamma Knife team has treated more than 137 acoustic neuromas - a generally slow-growing, benign tumor that can cause hearing loss, dizziness, tinnitus, and problems with balance, as it presses on the nerve leading to the inner ear. (lancastergeneralhealth.org)
  • Paget's disease affecting the skull may lead to loss of hearing in one or both ears due to compression of the nerves in the inner ear. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although we recognize that over time, loud or repetitive noises can damage sensory cells and nerve fibers in the inner ear, this damage tends to worsen hearing but isn't painful. (drweil.com)
  • spinal
  • Distal spinal muscular atrophy type 1 (DSMA1), also known as spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 (SMARD1), distal hereditary motor neuronopathy type 6 (DHMN6), and severe infantile axonal neuronopathy with respiratory failure (SIANRF) - is a rare neuromuscular disorder involving death of motor neurons in the spinal cord which leads to a generalized progressive atrophy of body muscles. (wikipedia.org)
  • Central nervous system diseases, also known as central nervous system disorders, are a group of neurological disorders that affect the structure or function of the brain or spinal cord, which collectively form the central nervous system (CNS). (wikipedia.org)
  • There are 31 pairs of spinal nerves along the spinal cord, all of which consist of both sensory and motor neurons. (wikipedia.org)
  • Abducens
  • Moreover, while the abducens and the trochlear nerve each innervate one specific muscle, the oculomotor nerve has many functions including eyelid retraction and pupil constriction. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is an interaction between the abducens nerve and a branch of the oculomotor nerve. (wikipedia.org)
  • Voluntary activation of the abducens nerve (eye abduction) causes involuntary activation of the oculomotor nerve (eye adduction and eyelid elevation). (wikipedia.org)
  • On attempted abduction, the eye's unreactive pupil constricts Another interaction, yet different, is between eye abduction (abducens nerve) and pupil constriction (the oculomotor nerve). (wikipedia.org)
  • tick-borne di
  • While tick-borne diseases aren't common - in 2014, according to the state Department of Health, there were 3,286 cases of Lyme disease and 169 cases of babesiosis - the effects can be significant enough that as parents and board members, we should be aware of these illnesses. (njsba.org)
  • Reference to, "Critical Needs and Gaps in Understanding Prevention, Amelioration, and Resolution of Lyme and Other Tick-Borne Diseases," by Institute of Medicine of National Academies. (natcaplyme.org)
  • There are many tick-borne diseases. (psychiatryadvisor.com)
  • It generally causes a disease that is much less severe and dramatic than the other tick-borne diseases mentioned. (psychiatryadvisor.com)
  • conduction
  • Dyck et al ( 7 ) classified hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies into two main groups based on the presence or absence of decreased nerve conduction velocities and neuronal hypertrophy. (ajnr.org)
  • In patients with severe injury, progress is followed with nerve conduction studies. (wikipedia.org)
  • If nerve conduction studies show a large (>90%) change in nerve conduction, the nerve should be decompressed. (wikipedia.org)
  • infection
  • She was treated for Lyme disease, but the two ticks delivered more than one infection. (njsba.org)
  • They believe that this evidence shows that Lyme disease is a persistent infection that can elude standard courses of antibiotics . (natcaplyme.org)
  • The classic sign of early local infection with Lyme disease is a circular, outwardly expanding rash called erythema chronicum migrans (EM), which occurs at the site of the tick bite three to 32 days after the tick bite. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lyme Disease
  • She notified her state health department and thus began the investigation leading to the identification of Lyme disease. (njsba.org)
  • By 1991, improved understanding of Lyme disease led Assemblywoman Marlene Ford (now a Superior Court judge in Ocean County) and Assemblyman John Doyle to successfully steer legislation creating education laws which require public school districts to develop curriculum guidelines about prevention, as well as how to address the needs of students (the word in the legislation is "victims") struggling with Lyme disease. (njsba.org)
  • The Lyme disease bacteria ( Borellia burgdorferi ) is transmitted by black-legged ticks ( Ixodes scapularis ), commonly known as deer ticks. (njsba.org)
  • Lyme disease is the fastest-spreading vector-borne disease in the United States, with more than 300,000 estimated cases diagnosed annually. (natcaplyme.org)
  • Lyme disease has been reported in every state in the United States. (natcaplyme.org)
  • People contract Lyme disease and related co-infections from the bite of an infected tick. (natcaplyme.org)
  • However, a bulls-eye's rash always indicates exposure to Lyme disease. (natcaplyme.org)
  • Diagnostic tests for Lyme disease are notoriously unreliable, resulting in false negative and false positive results. (natcaplyme.org)
  • This "Western blot" test identifies specific antibody proteins found in Lyme disease. (natcaplyme.org)
  • In 2013 in Virginia, the Lyme Disease Information Disclosure Act highlighted the fact that a negative ELISA test does not necessarily mean you do not have Lyme disease. (natcaplyme.org)
  • Science journalist and author, Pam Weintraub, noted at the workshop, "If we are ever to unravel the mysteries of Lyme disease and find a cure, it is science ̶ pure and unadulterated ̶ that will lead us home. (natcaplyme.org)
  • However, the five that result in the most significant medical issues - either because of potential severity or relative frequency - are: RMSF, ehrlichia, anaplasma, babesia and Lyme disease (LD). (psychiatryadvisor.com)
  • Natural News ) Biologists say that 2017 is going to be a big year for Lyme disease, and that the condition could ravage the United States and other parts of North America. (naturalnews.com)
  • But what do mice have to do with Lyme disease? (naturalnews.com)
  • While deer are commonly thought of as the sole bearers of Lyme disease, which then infects ticks feasting on their blood, it appears that a much smaller mammal is capable of doing a lot more damage. (naturalnews.com)
  • when mice populations grow larger, the size of the following year's Lyme disease pool also grows larger. (naturalnews.com)
  • At one point in time, Lyme disease was generally seen only in New England, and a small portion of Wisconsin. (naturalnews.com)
  • Untreated Lyme disease can spread to the heart, joints, and nervous system. (naturalnews.com)
  • In the last thirty years, the number of yearly Lyme disease cases has tripled, and the disease has spread across the continental U.S. like wildfire. (naturalnews.com)
  • Currently, mainstream medicine's only treatment for Lyme disease is antibiotics. (naturalnews.com)
  • Antibiotics need to be administered early in order to effectively clear the bacteria from the body, but some people still go on to develop chronic Lyme disease. (naturalnews.com)
  • Though antibiotics are the primary route of treatment, it seems that no single antibiotic is capable of eliminating the bacteria that causes Lyme disease in entirety, and no currently available treatment is immune to failure or relapse. (naturalnews.com)
  • However, some alternative treatments for Lyme disease have also shown great success, even for those with late-stage Lyme disease. (naturalnews.com)
  • There are many other alternative treatments used for Lyme disease , such as antiviral and antibacterial nutraceuticals, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, along with a number of traditional Chinese medicine techniques. (naturalnews.com)
  • Depending on the environment, it will benefit the puppy to receive vaccinations against upper respiratory diseases (parainfluenza and Bordatella bronchiseptica) , leptospirosis, and/or Lyme disease. (hubpages.com)
  • Lyme disease is transmitted to humans by the bite of infected ticks of the Ixodes genus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lyme disease is the most common disease spread by ticks in the Northern Hemisphere. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lyme disease was diagnosed as a separate condition for the first time in 1975 in Old Lyme, Connecticut. (wikipedia.org)
  • occurs
  • Recovery typically occurs several weeks or months after resolution of the underlying disease. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Nerve damage occurs at a later disease stage toward the end of the lepromatous spectrum, when sensory loss generally involves the distal extremities, with the facial nerve being commonly involved [ 5 ]. (e-ceo.org)
  • Rocky Mountain spotted fever* is a rickettsial disease that occurs in dogs and humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • commonly
  • Paget's disease of bone (commonly known as Paget's disease or historically, osteitis deformans) is a condition involving cellular remodeling and deformity of one or more bones. (wikipedia.org)
  • Paget's disease may affect any one or multiple bones of the body (most commonly pelvis, femur, and lumbar vertebrae, and skull), but never the entire skeleton, and does not spread from bone to bone. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most commonly, facial paralysis follows temporal bone fractures, though the likelihood depends on the type of fracture. (wikipedia.org)
  • The disease in dogs can affect the lungs and skin, but more commonly the eye and central nervous system. (wikipedia.org)
  • brainstem
  • A brainstem lesion could also cause impaired functioning of multiple cranial nerves, but this condition would likely also be accompanied by distal motor impairment. (wikipedia.org)
  • hemifacial
  • Clarifying the role of genetic susceptibility in hemifacial spasm may help to better understand the pathogenesis of this disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Trochlear
  • In this case voluntary activation of the trochlear nerve (eye depression + eye abduction) is involuntarily activating a branch of the oculomotor nerve responsible for eyelid retraction. (wikipedia.org)
  • diagnosis
  • Due to the unrelenting efforts of people who are seeking a cure to this epidemic, many research efforts are underway today to improve testing and diagnosis as well as treatments for Lyme and associated diseases. (natcaplyme.org)
  • RMSF is unquestionably the most severe and most important to consider the diagnosis early. (psychiatryadvisor.com)
  • bone
  • It is a cancer of plasma cells in the bone marrow, a rare disease. (businessofcinema.com)
  • Advanced Paget's disease may lead to other medical conditions, including: Osteoarthritis may result from changes in bone shape that alter normal skeletal mechanics. (wikipedia.org)
  • There is a hereditary factor in the development of Paget's disease of bone. (wikipedia.org)
  • Two genes, SQSTM1 and RANK, and specific regions of chromosome 5 and 6 are associated with Paget's disease of bone. (wikipedia.org)
  • About 40-50% of people with the inherited version of Paget's disease have a mutation in the gene SQSTM1, which encodes a protein, called p62, that is involved in regulating the function of osteoclasts (bone cells). (wikipedia.org)
  • Paget's disease of bone is associated with mutations in RANK. (wikipedia.org)
  • ulcers
  • Corneal ulcers are extremely painful due to nerve exposure, and can cause tearing, squinting, and vision loss of the eye. (wikipedia.org)
  • Corneal ulcers are a common human eye disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Deep ulcers extend into or through the stroma and can result in severe scarring and corneal perforation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Immune-mediated eye disease can cause ulcers at the border of the cornea and sclera. (wikipedia.org)
  • Corneal ulcers are one of the most common eye diseases in dogs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Non-ambulant patients may develop pressure ulcers, severe constipation, urinary incontinence, and (rarely) reflux nephropathy in the advanced stages of the disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • viral disease
  • Rabies (hydrophobia) is a fatal viral disease that can affect any mammal, although the close relationship of dogs with humans makes canine rabies a zoonotic concern. (wikipedia.org)
  • disorder
  • Case reports describing the imaging appearance of nerve hypertrophy in this disorder can be found from the mid-1970s with myelography, in the mid-1980s with CT, and to the current time with MR ( 2 - 5 ). (ajnr.org)
  • brain
  • Although the most frequent cause is a blood vessel pressing on the facial nerve at the spot where it leaves the patient's brain stem, sometimes there is no known cause. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mild
  • Mild or early cases of Pagets are asymptomatic, and so most people are diagnosed with Paget's disease incidentally during medical evaluation for another problem. (wikipedia.org)
  • Numbness and paresthesia may accompany or precede loss of motor function, which varies from mild to severe. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Canine coronavirus is a gastrointestinal disease that is usually asymptomatic or with mild clinical signs. (wikipedia.org)
  • infectious
  • Leprosy, or Hansen disease, is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae , first characterized by G. Armauer Hansen in 1873. (e-ceo.org)
  • Canine distemper is an often fatal infectious disease that mainly has respiratory and neurologic signs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Canine influenza is a newly emerging infectious respiratory disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Infectious canine hepatitis is a sometimes fatal infectious disease of the liver. (wikipedia.org)
  • Canine herpesvirus is an infectious disease that is a common cause of death in puppies less than three weeks old. (wikipedia.org)
  • Canine minute virus is an infectious disease that can cause respiratory and gastrointestinal signs in young puppies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Leptospirosis is an infectious disease caused by a spirochaete. (wikipedia.org)
  • Kennel cough is an infectious respiratory disease which can be caused by one of several viruses or by Bordetella bronchiseptica. (wikipedia.org)
  • depends on the cause
  • Treatment depends on the cause, but is largely conservative with facial retraining or mime therapy, if needed, while Botox and surgery are used as last resort. (wikipedia.org)
  • populations
  • Wild Tasmanian devil populations are being monitored to track the spread of the disease and to identify changes in disease prevalence. (wikipedia.org)
  • Field workers are also testing the effectiveness of disease suppression by trapping and removing diseased devils, with the expectation that removal of diseased devils from wild populations would decrease disease prevalence, allowing devils to survive beyond juvenile years and so to breed. (wikipedia.org)
  • syndrome
  • LD is also a tick-transmitted disease and characteristically produces a different syndrome with a typical rash. (psychiatryadvisor.com)
  • Reactivation of latent virus within the dorsal root ganglion of the facial nerve is associated with vesicles affecting the ear canal, and termed Ramsay Hunt syndrome type II. (wikipedia.org)