• nucleotides
  • In eukaryotes, a poly-(A) tail (consisting of a long sequence of adenine nucleotides) distinguishes mRNA from tRNA and rRNA and can therefore be used as a primer site for reverse transcription. (wikipedia.org)
  • Once mRNA is purified, oligo-dT (a short sequence of deoxy-thymidine nucleotides) is tagged as a complementary primer which binds to the poly-A tail providing a free 3'-OH end that can be extended by reverse transcriptase to create the complementary DNA strand. (wikipedia.org)
  • The plasmid is 206,479 nucleotides long, the GC content is 56% and 81% of the material is coding genes. (wikipedia.org)
  • To be specific, TERT is responsible for catalyzing the addition of nucleotides in a TTAGGG sequence to the ends of a chromosome's telomeres. (wikipedia.org)
  • Restriction enzymes recognize a specific sequence of nucleotides and produce a double-stranded cut in the DNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • enzyme
  • Cutting with a single enzyme and religating and transforming gave a single length circular plasmids with a well defined sequence. (protocol-online.org)
  • In a similar fashion the RSFC strategy can be applied in other expression hosts to screen for optimal promoters, signal sequences or to facilitate the evaluation of (iso-) enzyme families. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The sequence in pBR322 is List of restriction enzyme cutting sites Watson, N. (1988). (wikipedia.org)
  • EcoRI digestion produces "sticky" ends, whereas SmaI restriction enzyme cleavage produces "blunt" ends: Recognition sequences in DNA differ for each restriction enzyme, producing differences in the length, sequence and strand orientation (5' end or 3' end) of a sticky-end "overhang" of an enzyme restriction. (wikipedia.org)
  • Naturally-occurring P elements contain: Coding sequence for the enzyme transposase Recognition sequences for transposase action Transposase is an enzyme that regulates and catalyzes the excision of a P element from the host DNA, cutting at two recognition sites, and then reinserting randomly. (wikipedia.org)
  • It also denatures proteins, like DNase, which is especially important if the plasmids are to be used for enzyme digestion. (wikipedia.org)
  • Otherwise, smearing may occur in enzyme restricted form of plasmid DNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • molecules
  • Plasmids are double-stranded circular or linear DNA molecules. (coursera.org)
  • Microbiologists, seeking to understand the molecular mechanisms through which bacteria restricted the growth of bacteriophage, isolated restriction endonucleases, enzymes that could cleave DNA molecules only when specific DNA sequences were encountered. (wikipedia.org)
  • protein
  • These restriction site scars remain in the protein coding sequence (CDS) and are later translated into additional amino acids, which may interfere with the POI's properties. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Without functional RecA protein, the exogenous plasmid DNA is left unaltered by the bacteria. (wikipedia.org)
  • bacteriophage
  • Inserts larger than 10kbp have very limited success, but bacteriophages such as bacteriophage λ can be modified to successfully insert a sequence up to 40 kbp. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cosmids are predominantly plasmids with a bacterial oriV, an antibiotic selection marker and a cloning site, but they carry one, or more recently two, cos sites derived from bacteriophage lambda. (wikipedia.org)
  • double-stranded
  • The inverted repeat palindrome is also a sequence that reads the same forward and backward, but the forward and backward sequences are found in complementary DNA strands (i.e., of double-stranded DNA), as in GTATAC (GTATAC being complementary to CATATG). (wikipedia.org)
  • insertion
  • The other LCR-related ORFs are interspersed among three intact insertion sequence (IS) elements (IS 100 and two new IS elements, IS 1616 and IS 1617 ) and numerous defective or partial transposable elements. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • The conjugation system and insertion sequences of the IncN plasmid R46 (PhD thesis). (wikipedia.org)
  • recognition
  • The search process induces stretching of the DNA duplex, which enhances sequence complementarity recognition (a mechanism termed conformational proofreading). (wikipedia.org)
  • Restriction enzymes of this type are more useful for laboratory work as they cleave DNA at the site of their recognition sequence. (wikipedia.org)
  • Transformation
  • These carried two different sequences (similar to the trace you have above) that were impossible to resolve with any amount of streaking or re-transformation. (protocol-online.org)
  • In a process called transformation, plasmid DNA is taken up by the bacteria under a variety of conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Virtually
  • Virtually any DNA sequence can be cloned and amplified, but there are some factors that might limit the success of the process. (wikipedia.org)
  • similar
  • This plasmid also had a single position mixed base, similar to what you have found. (protocol-online.org)
  • pTi and pRi share little sequence homology but are functionally rather similar. (wikipedia.org)
  • A Biopython Seq object is similar to a Python string in many respects: it supports the Python slice notation, can be concatenated with other sequences and is immutable. (wikipedia.org)
  • help
  • tested this notion by using Sleeping Beauty transposons to help insert sequences into mice with sickle cell anemia so they can produce the enzymes need to counteract their anemia. (wikipedia.org)