• nucleotides
  • The plasmid is 206,479 nucleotides long, the GC content is 56% and 81% of the material is coding genes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Restriction enzymes recognize a specific sequence of nucleotides and produce a double-stranded cut in the DNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • In eukaryotes, a poly-(A) tail (consisting of a long sequence of adenine nucleotides) distinguishes mRNA from tRNA and rRNA and can therefore be used as a primer site for reverse transcription. (wikipedia.org)
  • Once mRNA is purified, oligo-dT (a short sequence of deoxy-thymidine nucleotides) is tagged as a complementary primer which binds to the poly-A tail providing a free 3'-OH end that can be extended by reverse transcriptase to create the complementary DNA strand. (wikipedia.org)
  • To be specific, TERT is responsible for catalyzing the addition of nucleotides in a TTAGGG sequence to the ends of a chromosome's telomeres. (wikipedia.org)
  • genes
  • Outside the T-DNA, are located the genes for the opine catabolism, the genes involved in the process of T-DNA transfer from the bacterium to the plant cell and the genes involved in bacterium-bacterium plasmid conjugative transfer. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Ti plasmid also contains the genes for opine catabolism produced by the crown gall cells, and regions for conjugative transfer and for its own integrity and stability. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Ti plasmids are classified into different types based on the type of opine produced by their genes. (wikipedia.org)
  • The plasmid has 196 genes that code for 195 proteins. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1977) Rat insulin genes: Construction of plasmids containing the coding sequences. (wikipedia.org)
  • Through homology in at least one and usually several genes, polintons are evolutionarily linked to linear plasmids, virophages (especially Mavirus virophage, family Lavidaviridae), giant viruses (Megavirales), Ginger 1 transposons, Tlr1 transposons, transpovirons, eukaryotic viruses of the Adenoviridae family, and bacteriophages of the Tectiviridae family. (wikipedia.org)
  • genome sequences
  • However, with more and more complete bacterial genome sequences at hand, the AT and GC composition are meanwhile known to be skewed between leading and lagging strand [ 15 , 16 ] and the extrapolation of the first-order parity rule to higher orders of oligonucleotide composition has yet not been investigated in sufficient depth to draw any valid conclusions. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Right now, we have genome sequences from 50 different bacterial phyla and 11 different archaeal phyla. (wikipedia.org)
  • enzyme
  • Cutting with a single enzyme and religating and transforming gave a single length circular plasmids with a well defined sequence. (protocol-online.org)
  • In a similar fashion the RSFC strategy can be applied in other expression hosts to screen for optimal promoters, signal sequences or to facilitate the evaluation of (iso-) enzyme families. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The sequence in pBR322 is List of restriction enzyme cutting sites Watson, N. (1988). (wikipedia.org)
  • EcoRI digestion produces "sticky" ends, whereas SmaI restriction enzyme cleavage produces "blunt" ends: Recognition sequences in DNA differ for each restriction enzyme, producing differences in the length, sequence and strand orientation (5' end or 3' end) of a sticky-end "overhang" of an enzyme restriction. (wikipedia.org)
  • It also denatures proteins, like DNase, which is especially important if the plasmids are to be used for enzyme digestion. (wikipedia.org)
  • Otherwise, smearing may occur in enzyme restricted form of plasmid DNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • Naturally-occurring P elements contain: Coding sequence for the enzyme transposase Recognition sequences for transposase action Transposase is an enzyme that regulates and catalyzes the excision of a P element from the host DNA, cutting at two recognition sites, and then reinserting randomly. (wikipedia.org)
  • protein
  • These restriction site scars remain in the protein coding sequence (CDS) and are later translated into additional amino acids, which may interfere with the POI's properties. (biomedcentral.com)
  • double-stranded
  • The inverted repeat palindrome is also a sequence that reads the same forward and backward, but the forward and backward sequences are found in complementary DNA strands (i.e., of double-stranded DNA), as in GTATAC (GTATAC being complementary to CATATG). (wikipedia.org)
  • recognition
  • The search process induces stretching of the DNA duplex, which enhances sequence complementarity recognition (a mechanism termed conformational proofreading). (wikipedia.org)
  • Restriction enzymes of this type are more useful for laboratory work as they cleave DNA at the site of their recognition sequence. (wikipedia.org)
  • Virtually
  • Virtually any DNA sequence can be cloned and amplified, but there are some factors that might limit the success of the process. (wikipedia.org)
  • similar
  • This plasmid also had a single position mixed base, similar to what you have found. (protocol-online.org)
  • pTi and pRi share little sequence homology but are functionally rather similar. (wikipedia.org)
  • A Biopython Seq object is similar to a Python string in many respects: it supports the Python slice notation, can be concatenated with other sequences and is immutable. (wikipedia.org)
  • help
  • tested this notion by using Sleeping Beauty transposons to help insert sequences into mice with sickle cell anemia so they can produce the enzymes need to counteract their anemia. (wikipedia.org)
  • structural
  • Mutagenesis and repair, restriction-modification systems, amino acid frequency, codon bias and structural parameters, to name just a few, should all influence the frequency and sequence of oligonucleotides. (biomedcentral.com)