• expressive
  • First described by the French neurologist Paul Broca in the nineteenth century, expressive aphasia causes the speech of those afflicted to display a considerable vocabulary but to show grammatical deficits. (wikipedia.org)
  • The view of expressive aphasia as an expressive disorder is supported by its frequent co-occurrence with facial motor difficulties, and its anatomical localization. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although expressive aphasia may be caused by brain damage to many regions, it is most commonly associated with the inferior frontal gyrus, a region that overlaps with motor cortex controlling the mouth and tongue, extending into the periventricular white matter. (wikipedia.org)
  • broca's aphasia
  • Broca's aphasia is characterized by non-fluent or telegraphic-type speech - where articles, conjunctions, prepositions, auxiliary verbs, pronouns and morphological inflections (plurals, past tense) are omitted. (wikipedia.org)
  • Not much is known about what other areas must be damaged in order to produce Broca's aphasia, but some maintain damage to the inferior preorlandic motor strip (the motor cortex region responsible glossopharyngeal muscle control) is also necessary. (wikipedia.org)
  • person's
  • This requires the ability in the person making the copy to map the sensory input they hear from the other person's vocal pronunciation into a similar motor output with their own vocal tract . (thefullwiki.org)
  • To be diagnosed with aphasia, a person's speech or language must be significantly impaired in one (or several) of the four communication modalities following acquired brain injury or have significant decline over a short time period (progressive aphasia). (wikipedia.org)
  • brain
  • Aphasia is an inability to comprehend and formulate language because of damage to specific brain regions. (wikipedia.org)
  • The term aphasia implies that one or more communication modalities in the brain have been damaged and are therefore functioning incorrectly. (wikipedia.org)
  • People with aphasia may experience any of the following behaviors due to an acquired brain injury, although some of these symptoms may be due to related or concomitant problems such as dysarthria or apraxia and not primarily due to aphasia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aphasia symptoms can vary based on the location of damage in the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therefore, the localization of the two best-known aphasias mirrors the grossest dichotomy in brain organization: anterior areas are specialized for motor output, and posterior areas for sensory processing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Severe
  • Struggle in non-fluent aphasias: A severe increase in expelled effort to speak after a life where talking and communicating was an ability that came so easily can cause visible frustration. (wikipedia.org)
  • disorder
  • For dynamic aphasia, this is most apparent when the patient is asked to sequence at the sentence level whereas for other aphasias contiguity disorder can be seen at the phoneme or word level. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aphasia is any disorder of language that causes the patient to have the inability to communicate, whether it is through writing, speaking, or sign language. (wikipedia.org)
  • temporal
  • The herpes simplex virus affects the frontal and temporal lobes, subcortical structures, and the hippocampal tissue, which can trigger aphasia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Memantine
  • Memantine and CIAT alone improved aphasia compared with placebo, but the best outcomes were observed when memantine and CIAT were combined. (medscape.com)
  • left hemisphere
  • Aphasia can also sometimes be caused by damage to subcortical structures deep within the left hemisphere, including the thalamus, the internal and external capsules, and the caudate nucleus of the basal ganglia. (wikipedia.org)
  • symptoms
  • Signs and symptoms may or may not be present in individuals with aphasia and may vary in severity and level of disruption to communication. (wikipedia.org)
  • commonly associated
  • Paraphasia is a type of language output error commonly associated with aphasia, and characterized by the production of unintended syllables, words, or phrases during the effort to speak. (wikipedia.org)
  • language
  • Lidzba K, Staudt M, Zieske F, Schwilling E, Ackermann H. Prestroke/poststroke fMRI in aphasia: Perilesional hemodynamic activation and language recovery. (medscape.com)
  • Language and Language Disturbances: Aphasic Symptom Complexes and Their Significance for Medicine and Theory of Language is a book on aphasia by Dr. Kurt Goldstein, published in 1948. (wikipedia.org)
  • In Language and Language Disturbances, Goldstein theorized that a loss of abstract processing was the core deficit in aphasia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aphasia also affects visual language such as sign language. (wikipedia.org)
  • damage
  • Substantial damage to tissue anywhere within the region shown in blue on the figure below can potentially result in aphasia. (wikipedia.org)
  • A very small number of people can experience aphasia after damage to the right hemisphere only. (wikipedia.org)
  • primary
  • Semantic interference during object naming in agrammatic and logopenic primary progressive aphasia (PPA). (medscape.com)
  • Anderson P. Famous Faces Give Insight to Primary Progressive Aphasia. (medscape.com)
  • In primary progressive aphasia, the drugs used for Alzheimer disease have not been proven beneficial (and a cholinergic deficiency is not evident as in Alzheimer disease). (medscape.com)