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  • factors
  • Various factors have been described in the pathophysiology of febrile seizures like bacterial and viral infections (2), susceptibility of the immature brain to temperature (3), association with interleukins (4), circulating toxins (5), trace element deficiency (6) and iron deficiency (7). (ac.ir)
  • However, possible risk factors have been identified, including severity and type of injury, presence of early seizures, and genetic factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • motor
  • Clinical examination showed mild left hemiparesis and left lower extremity myoclonic seizures triggered by motor activation and standing (see online supplementary video 1). (bmj.com)
  • normal
  • Febrile seizures occur in developmentally and neurologically normal children between ages 6 months to 5 years of age who are also experiencing a fever and who are without an infection of the central nervous system. (rainbowbabies.org)
  • result
  • Febrile seizures are seizures that occur between the age of 6 and 60 months with a temperature of 38°C or higher, that are not the result of central nervous system infection or any metabolic imbalance, and that occur in the absence of a history of prior non-febrile seizures (1). (ac.ir)
  • Late seizures are considered to be unprovoked, while early seizures (those occurring within a week of trauma) are thought to result from direct effects of the injury. (wikipedia.org)
  • central
  • Scalp EEG showed focal seizure discharges consisting of rhythmic midline central sharp waves. (bmj.com)

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  • sudden
  • Seizure is often associated with a sudden and involuntary contraction of a group of muscles. (slideshare.net)
  • Seizures are caused by a sudden surge of electrical activity in the brain. (kidshealth.org)
  • And anything that results in a sudden lack of oxygen or reduced blood flow to the brain can cause a seizure. (kidshealth.org)
  • A seizure is a sudden disruption of the brain's normal electrical activity accompanied by altered consciousness and/or other neurological and behavioral manifestations. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Sudden withdrawal from anticonvulsants may lead to seizures. (wikipedia.org)
  • The main sign of a gelastic seizure is a sudden outburst of laughter or crying with no apparent cause. (wikipedia.org)
  • Incidence
  • Chung B, Wat LC, Wong V. Febrile seizures in southern Chinese children: incidence and recurrence. (medscape.com)
  • The incidence of neonatal seizures has not been clearly established, although an estimated frequency of 80-120 cases per 100,000 neonates per year has been suggested. (wikipedia.org)
  • The incidence of seizures is higher in the neonatal period (i.e., the first 4 wk after birth) than at any other time of life Most common type of new born seizure.Seizures in neonates can be hard to distinguish and subtle seizures can be misinterpreted as crying or cycling movements of limbs. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed
  • citation needed] EEGs taken of patients immediately following light alcohol consumption have not revealed any increase in seizure activity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most of the time any one of these actions can be seen as normal movements, without being associated with the seizure occurring[citation needed]. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] A gelastic seizure is typically caused by a hypothalamic hamartoma, or a brain tumor. (wikipedia.org)
  • consciousness
  • A generalized tonic-clonic (grand-mal) seizure begins with a loud cry before the person having the seizure loses consciousness and falls to the ground. (encyclopedia.com)
  • A grand mal seizure lasts between two and five minutes, and the person may be confused or have trouble talking when he regains consciousness (postictal state). (encyclopedia.com)
  • After the active portion of a seizure, there is typically a period of confusion called the postictal period before a normal level of consciousness returns. (wikipedia.org)
  • A focal impaired awareness seizure affects a larger part of the hemisphere and the person may lose consciousness. (wikipedia.org)
  • Such seizures are often experienced by people with epilepsy, in which an electroencephalogram (EEG) trace will show abnormal brain activity, usually for a short time, but level of consciousness is normal. (wikipedia.org)
  • likelihood
  • Although they are more difficult to link to a seizure, other factors can also increase the likelihood that a seizure will happen. (uptodate.com)
  • These include: Angelman syndrome Arteriovenous malformation Brain abscess Brain tumor Cavernoma Cerebral palsy Down syndrome Eclampsia Epilepsy Encephalitis Fragile X syndrome Meningitis Multiple sclerosis Systemic lupus erythematosus Tuberous sclerosis Other conditions have been associated with lower seizure thresholds and/or increased likelihood of seizure comorbidity (but not necessarily with seizure induction). (wikipedia.org)
  • There are varying opinions on the likelihood of alcoholic beverages triggering a seizure. (wikipedia.org)
  • Consuming alcohol may temporarily reduce the likelihood of a seizure immediately following consumption. (wikipedia.org)
  • But studies have not found light drinking to increase the likelihood of having a seizure at all. (wikipedia.org)
  • effects of antiepileptic drugs
  • Vitamins have been reported to be effective in controlling certain types of seizures and to prevent some of the harmful effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). (cochrane.org)
  • Folic acid in large amounts was considered to potentially counteract the antiseizure effects of antiepileptic drugs and increase the seizure frequency in some children, although that concern is no longer held by epileptologists. (wikipedia.org)
  • abnormal
  • During a seizure, there is abnormal and excessive electrical activity in the brain. (uptodate.com)
  • Provoked seizures - A similar type of abnormal electrical activity in the brain can be caused by certain drugs, alcohol withdrawal, and other imbalances, such as a low blood sugar. (uptodate.com)
  • Focal aware seizures often precede larger focal impaired awareness seizures, where the abnormal electrical activity spreads to a larger area of the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • migraines
  • Sometimes seizures may go unnoticed, depending on their presentation, and sometimes seizures may be confused with other events, such as a stroke, which can also cause falls or migraines. (slideshare.net)
  • My headaches have become unbearable and I am having problems finding information that links the TGA, seizures, and migraines. (medhelp.org)
  • migraines and seizures Recently I was diagnosed with Transient Global Amnesia. (medhelp.org)
  • The neurological condition that combines migraines with epileptic seizures is known as migralepsy. (wikipedia.org)
  • post-ictal
  • The person often does not fall over and may return to normal right after the seizure ends, though there may also be a period of post-ictal disorientation. (wikipedia.org)
  • cause
  • Success rates for cessation or near-cessation of seizures ranges from about 50-90%, depending upon the cause of seizures and their brain location. (rochester.edu)
  • Sometimes, seizures are triggered by a disease or injury, but for most children, there is no detectable cause. (childrenshospital.org)
  • Antiepileptic drugs stop seizures for 70% of people with epilepsy and cause a number of side effects. (cochrane.org)
  • Seizures can cause involuntary changes in body movement or function, sensation, awareness, or behavior. (slideshare.net)
  • Visual seizures, which affect the area of the brain that controls sight, cause people to see things that are not there. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Auditory seizures affect the part of the brain that controls hearing and cause the patient to imagine voices, music, and other sounds. (encyclopedia.com)
  • There is no evidence to suggest that brief febrile seizures cause any brain damage, epilepsy, or learning problems. (news-medical.net)
  • Seizures may also cause 'sensations' that only the patient feels. (uptodate.com)
  • In many cases, the cause of epileptic seizures is not clear. (uptodate.com)
  • Josh has seizures but not seen, he has no flapping, eye rolling etc, but he has these seizures that lasts for seconds, they can cause problems and finding them is hard. (ldonline.org)
  • Safety - These seizures tend to decrease as the person is exercising so they don't really seem to cause a problem. (ldonline.org)
  • In some instances, especially with young children, the cause of the seizure may be unknown. (healthline.com)
  • Lab tests may help your doctor rule out other conditions that can cause seizure-like activity. (healthline.com)
  • Examples include the following: Vitamin B1 deficiency (thiamine deficiency) was reported to cause seizures, especially in alcoholics Vitamin B6 depletion (pyridoxine deficiency) was reported to be associated with pyridoxine-dependent seizures. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most frequent cause of seizures in children is febrile seizures, which happen in 2-5% of children between the ages of six months and five years. (wikipedia.org)
  • The main conflicting issues are whether seizures in newborns can plant the roots for epileptogenesis and cause long-term deficits. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, although a computed tomography scan may be useful in diagnosing the cause of a seizure, in the case of a hypothalamic hamartoma, magnetic resonance imaging is the tool of choice due to the cerebrospinal fluid which defines these masses. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gelastic seizures have been observed after taking a birth control pill (Maxim (R)). Optic nerve hypoplasia is the only reported condition with gelastic seizures without hypothalamic hamartomas, suggesting that hypothalamic disorganization alone can cause gelastic seizures. (wikipedia.org)
  • The treatment depends on the cause of the seizures. (wikipedia.org)
  • movements
  • These movements most commonly are associated with electrographic seizures. (wikipedia.org)
  • During or shortly after a seizure, an individual might display some twitching, strange eye movements, lip smacking, fidgeting or mumbling. (wikipedia.org)
  • behavior
  • When you are told about your behavior during the seizure, you may not believe it because you have no memory of the event. (uptodate.com)
  • precipitate
  • Some medicinal and recreational drugs can dose-dependently precipitate seizures in withdrawal, especially when withdrawing from high doses and/or chronic use. (wikipedia.org)