• regulation of gene ex
  • The fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans employs posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression as part of the transcriptome reprogramming that accompanies cellular stress ( 1 - 3 ). (asm.org)
  • contractions
  • Expansions are apparently dependent on the property of the repeat array to form hairpins, since DSB repair of a CAA 87 repeat induces only contractions of the repeat sequence. (embopress.org)
  • During lagging-strand synthesis, unusual structures such as slipped strands may form, which may result in expansions or contractions in the next replication round. (genetics.org)
  • promoter
  • 2 . A polynucleotide according to claim 1 , wherein the promoter is the RNA polymerase III H1-RNA gene promoter or a functional derivative thereof. (google.com)
  • 3 . A polynucleotide according to claim 1 , wherein the promoter is the RNA polymerase III 5S, U6, adenovirus VA1, Vault, telomerase RNA, or tRNA gene promoter or a functional derivative thereof. (google.com)
  • differential
  • The selected pathways were used to design panels of real-time PCR primers tailored for the top-ranked genes for differential gene expression analysis. (bio-rad.com)
  • Each gene target within a pathway was assigned a score based on the frequency of differential expression and its research significance. (bio-rad.com)
  • severity
  • The increase in the number of repeats over time leads to earlier development and increased severity of symptoms in affected individuals in successive generations. (lidsen.com)
  • inhibit
  • 15 . Use of a polynucleotide according to any one of claims 1 to 10 or a vector according to claim 11 to inhibit or reduce the expression of a gene. (google.com)
  • nucleotides
  • The letters stand for three nucleotides (complex organic molecules) known as cytosine, thymine, and guanine, and are repeated a certain number of times. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • In people who have DM1, this sequence of nucleotides is repeated too many times-more than the normal number of 37 times-and thus this section of the gene is too big. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • 6 . A polynucleotide according to claim 4 or 5 , wherein the spacer region is from seven to fifteen nucleotides in length and/or the region complementary to the target gene is from nineteen to twenty-one bases in length. (google.com)
  • Expression
  • Bio-Rad collaborated with Biogazelle, leaders in real-time PCR research, to design and experimentally validate PCR primers for gene expression assays across the human and mouse transcriptomes. (bio-rad.com)
  • Reference genes are used in relative gene expression analysis to normalize for variation in the amount of input messenger RNA (mRNA) among samples. (bio-rad.com)
  • To ensure accurate quantitation, it is important to include one or more reference genes exhibiting constant expression levels under the experimental conditions. (bio-rad.com)
  • Trinucleotide-repeat expansion within the HTT gene results in expression of a polyglutamine-expanded mutant huntingtin protein (mHTT). (plos.org)
  • Cancers are very often deficient in expression of one or more DNA repair genes, but over-expression of a DNA repair gene is unusual in cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Due to the triplet nature of gene expression by codons, the insertion or deletion can change the reading frame (the grouping of the codons), resulting in a completely different translation from the original. (wikipedia.org)
  • This combination functions as a transcription complex to turn on androgen gene expression. (wikipedia.org)
  • cytosine
  • This expansion results in a larger than normal number of repeats of the nucleotide sequence cytosine, adenine, guanine, or CAG, in the gene which, in turn, results in a larger than normal number of consecutive glutamine residues in the protein. (wikipedia.org)
  • carriers
  • 1999). Dominant NM patients have one mutant and one normal TPM3 gene copy, while human carriers of recessive alleles and TPM3+/- mice are normal, and TPM3-/- animals die as embryos (Lehtokari et al. (fitness-vip.com)
  • replication
  • In addition, stalling of the replication fork could result in double-strand breaks (DSBs) or fork reversal, leading to repeat length alterations ( M irkin and M irkin 2007 ). (genetics.org)
  • deletion
  • A second, homologous protein, Gis2, was identified in the genome of C. neoformans and also bound the 3′-UTR probe, and deletion of both genes resulted in loss of binding in cell extracts. (asm.org)
  • human
  • The human homolog of mbl, MBNL1, which was originally identified as binding CUG repeats in RNA, has since been shown to bind CAG (and CCG) repeats as well. (wikipedia.org)
  • normal
  • The clinical phenotype associated with MAIS is a normal male habitus with mild spermatogenic defect and / or reduced secondary terminal hair. (wikipedia.org)
  • People who have repeat numbers in the normal range will not develop DM1 and cannot pass it to their children. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • 2008). In both NM and LGMD1C examples, it would be advantageous to restrict gene knockdown to the affected allele while leaving the normal allele unperturbed. (fitness-vip.com)
  • RNAs
  • not all inhibitory RNAs containing perfect homology with a target mRNA actually cause gene silencing. (fitness-vip.com)
  • thus
  • The Mre11 complex thus appears to be directly involved in removing CAG or CTG hairpins that arise frequently during DNA synthesis accompanying gene conversion of these trinucleotide repeats. (embopress.org)
  • alleles
  • 10 . A polynucleotide according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein the siRNA is capable of discriminating between different alleles of the same gene. (google.com)
  • approaches
  • 1 Until recently, analysis has been targeted largely to defined genes, but pan-genomic approaches, such as microarrays, gene-panel testing and exome sequencing, have become mainstream. (cmaj.ca)