Loading...
  • severe
  • Regions of the brain that have high metabolic activity (high neuronal excitation), such as the basal ganglia and thalamus, are the most vulnerable to sudden and severe insults, which usually last 30 minutes or less. (abclawcenters.com)
  • The jarring of the brain maybe so slight that it only causes temporary dizziness and headache, sometimes it maybe severe to cause a complete loss of consciousness for a period of time. (graduateway.com)
  • lesions
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head provides superior information as compared to CT scans when seeking information about headache to confirm a diagnosis of neoplasm, vascular disease, posterior cranial fossa lesions, cervicomedullary lesions, or intracranial pressure disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • thrombosis
  • A CT scan of the brain demonstrated a comminuted-depressed fracture of the parietal bone in the midline with a rupture of the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) and secondary thrombosis (figure 1). (bmj.com)
  • structures
  • Increased pressure above the tentorium may also involve other midbrain structures. (wikipedia.org)
  • Identifying the location of these structures on a damaged brains compared to an unaffected brain is another way of categorizing the severity of the midline shift. (wikipedia.org)
  • respiratory
  • In response to rising intracranial pressure (ICP), respiratory cycles change in regularity and rate. (wikipedia.org)
  • The anaerobes often isolated from brain abscesses complicating respiratory and dental infections are anaerobic Gram-negative bacilli (AGNB, including Prevotella, Porphyromonas, Bacteroides), Fusobacterium and Peptostreptococcus spp. (wikipedia.org)
  • edema
  • Extra-/intracellular ion-shifts, an excessive glutamate release, an early formation of brain edema and acute vascular and molecular changes have been characterized as such pathophysiological mechanisms ( Sehba and Bederson, 2006 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • outcomes
  • Targeted temperature management (TTM) previously known as therapeutic hypothermia or protective hypothermia is an active treatment that tries to achieve and maintain a specific body temperature in a person for a specific duration of time in an effort to improve health outcomes during recovery after a period of stopped blood flow to the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • Reduction
  • The results of this study demonstrate for the first time a reduction of PDH activity following SAH, independent of supply of substrates and may be an independent factor contributing to a derangement of oxidative metabolism, failure of oxygen utilization, and secondary brain damage. (frontiersin.org)
  • The Cushing reflex classically presents as an increase in systolic and pulse pressure, reduction of the heart rate (bradycardia), and irregular respiration. (wikipedia.org)
  • utilization
  • At the stage of encephalitis, antimicrobial therapy and utilization of measures to lower the increase in the intracranial pressure can prevent the formation of an intracranial abscess However, after an abscess has emerged, surgical removal or drainage may be necessary, along with an extended course of antimicrobial therapy (4-8 weeks). (wikipedia.org)
  • stem
  • The sign is considered ominous because it is commonly associated with a distortion of the brain stem that can cause serious dysfunction evidenced by abnormal posturing and failure of the pupils to constrict in response to light. (wikipedia.org)
  • Human brain List of regions in the human brain Lobes of the brain Brain Basal ganglia Brain stem including Medulla oblongata, midbrain, pons Cerebellum Cerebral cortex Hypothalamus Limbic including amygdala Neuroanatomy Note - in conducting brain research, information "where the other end connects" is critical to understanding neural connections, and ultimately how the brain functions. (wikipedia.org)
  • nervous system
  • Central nervous system - consists of the brain, and the attached spinal cord. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cushing reflex (also referred to as the vasopressor response, the Cushing effect, the Cushing reaction, the Cushing phenomenon, the Cushing response, or Cushing's Law) is a physiological nervous system response to increased intracranial pressure (ICP) that results in Cushing's triad of increased blood pressure, irregular breathing, and bradycardia. (wikipedia.org)
  • decrease
  • This decreased flow often causes a reflexive HTN (increase in blood pressure) despite the actual decrease in intravascular volume. (wikipedia.org)
  • trials
  • These recommendations were largely based on two trials from 2002 which showed improved survival and brain function when cooled to 32-34 °C (90-93 °F) after cardiac arrest. (wikipedia.org)
  • chronic
  • The origin of brain abscess is generally an adjacent chronic ear, mastoid, or sinus infection oropharynx, teeth or lungs. (wikipedia.org)
  • tissue plasminog
  • It works by stimulating secondary fibrinolysis by plasmin through infusion of analogs of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), the protein that normally activates plasmin. (wikipedia.org)
  • oxygen
  • The brain is not able to store the right amount of oxygen and glucose to a significant degree because of this. (graduateway.com)
  • This causes restricted blood flow towards the brain, decreasing the oxygen delivery and waste removal. (graduateway.com)
  • A significant increase in brain tissue oxygen persisted for 240 minutes. (ahajournals.org)
  • 6,7 Brain tissue oxygen tension (P b O 2 ) reflects the availability of oxygen for oxidative energy production and represents the balance between oxygen supply and demand. (ahajournals.org)
  • Surgery
  • CT scanning of the head is also used in CT-guided stereotactic surgery and radiosurgery for treatment of intracranial tumors, arteriovenous malformations and other surgically treatable conditions using a device known as the N-localizer. (wikipedia.org)
  • assessment
  • 4. Your secondary assessment on a climber injured by a 10 meter (32 foot) fall reveals a deformed, tender, and very swollen left thigh. (wildmed.com)