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  • psychiatry
  • Dementia praecox was reconstituted as schizophrenia, paranoia was renamed as 'delusional disorder' and manic-depressive insanity as 'bipolar disorder' (epilepsy was transferred from psychiatry to neurology). (wikipedia.org)
  • clinical
  • Aripiprazole versus haloperidol in combination with clozapine for treatment-resistant schizophrenia in routine clinical care: a randomized, controlled trial. (nih.gov)
  • Schizophrenia Research is a peer-reviewed medical journal covering research on the cause, clinical diagnostics, and treatment of schizophrenia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Paranoid schizophrenia Catatonia Communication deviance The ICD-10 Classification of Mental and Behavioural Disorders - Clinical descriptions and diagnostic guidelines (PDF). (wikipedia.org)
  • Arieti reviews the paper by Frieda Fromm-Reichmann about the "schizophrenogenic" mother and reaches the tentative conclusion that only 25 percent of the mothers of people with schizophrenia in his clinical experience fit that image. (wikipedia.org)
  • In Interpretation of schizophrenia Arieti illustrates all of the above theoretical constructions with concrete cases of his clinical experience as a psychiatrist. (wikipedia.org)
  • onset
  • Schizophrenia has been recognized only over the past 100 years as a separate illness with its own unique pattern of onset, symptomatology, course, and treatment. (springer.com)
  • The term "childhood-onset schizophrenia" and "very early-onset schizophrenia" are used to identify patients in whom the disorder manifests before the age of 13. (wikipedia.org)
  • Childhood schizophrenia manifests before the age of 13, so it's correct names are "childhood-onset schizophrenia" (COS) and "very early-onset schizophrenia" (VEOS). (wikipedia.org)
  • Children are defined as persons under the age of 13, so the term "early onset schizophrenia" (EOS) is not not appropriate in the article about childhood schizophrenia. (wikipedia.org)
  • The epigenetics of schizophrenia is the study of how the inherited epigenetic changes is regulated and modified by the environment and external factors, and how these changes shape and influence the onset and development of, and vulnerability to, schizophrenia. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2002
  • Schizophrenia has a tremendous cost to society, estimated at $32.5 billion per year in the US (statistic from Brain Facts, Society for Neuroscience, 2002). (washington.edu)
  • glutamate
  • A number of theories attempt to explain the link between altered brain function and schizophrenia, including the dopamine hypothesis and the glutamate hypothesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Beside the dopamine hypothesis, interest has also focused on the neurotransmitter glutamate and the reduced function of the NMDA glutamate receptor in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. (wikipedia.org)
  • The fact that reduced glutamate function is linked to poor performance on tests requiring frontal lobe and hippocampal function and that glutamate can affect dopamine function, all of which have been implicated in schizophrenia, have suggested an important mediating (and possibly causal) role of glutamate pathways in schizophrenia. (wikipedia.org)
  • The large genome-wide association study mentioned above has supported glutamate abnormalities for schizophrenia, reporting several mutations in genes related to glutamatergic neurotransmission, such as GRIN2A, GRIA1, SRR, and GRM3. (wikipedia.org)
  • disorder
  • This helps to differentiate schizophrenia from other mental disorders, such as bipolar disorder . (wikipedia.org)
  • Although schizophrenia affects men and women with equal frequency, the disorder often appears earlier in men. (empowher.com)
  • as you can see, all sorts of nurses have been talking about mental illness, and the membership has been gracious and even curious about what it's like to live with schizophrenia, borderline personality disorder, depression, bipolar etc. (allnurses.com)
  • The current medical view is that all patients suffering from schizophrenia must take medications for the disorder. (wikipedia.org)
  • Schizophrenia does not imply a "split personality" or "dissociative identity disorder" - conditions with which it is often confused in public perception. (wikipedia.org)
  • At the current time, however, some researchers, regarded autism (autistic disorder) and schizophrenia as two distinct entities. (wikipedia.org)
  • He asks if schizophrenia is an illness and answers in the negative, since the disorder is not understood in classic Virchowian criterion of cellular pathology. (wikipedia.org)
  • While schizophrenia is a well-studied disorder, epigenetics offers a new avenue for research, understanding, and treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • dopamine
  • A receptor for the dopamine neurotransmitter promotes growth and spread of pancreatic cancer -- and schizophrenia drugs, which block the function of this receptor, slowed tumor growth and metastatic spread in mice, according to researchers at McGill University and the German Cancer Research Center. (mcgill.ca)
  • The first formulations of the dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia came from post-mortem studies finding increased striatal availability of D2/D3 receptors in the striatum, as well as studies finding elevated CSF levels of dopamine metabolites. (wikipedia.org)
  • When combined with findings in presynaptic dopamine function, most evidence suggests dysregulation of dopamine in schizophrenia. (wikipedia.org)
  • treatment
  • Conventional drug treatment for schizophrenia is moderately effective. (empowher.com)
  • Untreated schizophrenia is a very dangerous disease for which there is effective treatment, and for this reason it is not ethical to perform studies that compare a hypothetical new treatment against placebo. (empowher.com)
  • Therefore, studies of natural treatments for schizophrenia have looked at their potential benefit for enhancing the effects of standard treatment (or minimizing its side effects). (empowher.com)
  • Despite major advances in methodology and thousands of published studies every year, treatment outcomes in schizophrenia have not improved over the last fifty years. (mit.edu)
  • In this book, leading researchers consider conceptual and technical obstacles to progress in understanding schizophrenia and suggest novel strategies for advancing research and treatment. (mit.edu)
  • Revaz Korinteli, a professor of the Grigol Robakidze University, says that Snezhnevsky broadened the borders of schizophrenia, and in this connection there was legal and theoretical justification for employing compulsory, involuntary treatment of dissenters in mental hospitals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Schizophrenia: treatment, management, and rehabilitation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Treatment of schizophrenia changed dramatically in the mid-1950s with the development and introduction of the first antipsychotic chlorpromazine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Treatment-resistant schizophrenia" is the failure to respond to two or more antipsychotic medications given in therapeutic doses for six weeks or more. (wikipedia.org)
  • illness
  • Finding the causes for schizophrenia proves to be difficult as the cause and course of illness is unique for each person. (schizophrenia.ca)
  • Schizophrenia is a complex and confusing illness that can baffle family members, friends, the patient, and mental health professionals alike. (springer.com)
  • In order to accurately diagnose schizophrenia, the interviewer must possess an adequate fund of knowledge about the psychopathology of the illness, the relative merits of available assessment instruments, interviewing techniques, and methods for obtaining information necessary for the assessment. (springer.com)
  • A study of eye movements in schizophrenia patients provides new evidence of impaired reading fluency in individuals with the mental illness. (mcgill.ca)
  • behavioral
  • Steven M. Silverstein is Director of the Division of Schizophrenia Research at University Behavioral HealthCare, Rutgers Biomedical and Health Services, Rutgers University. (mit.edu)
  • There is no known cure, but childhood schizophrenia is controllable with the help of behavioral therapies and medications. (wikipedia.org)
  • A person with disorganized schizophrenia may also experience behavioral disorganization, which may impair his or her ability to carry out daily activities such as showering or eating. (wikipedia.org)
  • diagnostic
  • A diagnostic interview: The Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia. (springer.com)
  • When pseudoneurotic schizophrenia was still being utilized as a diagnostic term, doctors were expected to be able to magically cure patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • Studies have demonstrated that diagnostic criteria are similar to those of adult schizophrenia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sluggish schizophrenia as a diagnostic category was created to facilitate the stifling of dissidents and was a root of self-deception among psychiatrists to placate their consciences when the doctors acted as a tool of oppression in the name of a political system. (wikipedia.org)
  • genetic
  • This state of affairs partly reflects the daunting genetic and neurobiological complexity of this syndrome, but also reflects the persistence of the outdated view that schizophrenia represents one or a few conditions and of reductive explanations that focus on a single gene or neurotransmitter. (mit.edu)
  • The causes of schizophrenia include environmental and genetic factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • It also hosts the SzGene database, an unbiased field synopsis of genetic association studies performed in schizophrenia, though this database is no longer updated. (wikipedia.org)
  • Evidence suggests that genetic vulnerability with environmental factors can act in combination resulting in the development of schizophrenia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although twin studies and family studies have indicated a large degree of heritability for schizophrenia, the exact genetic causes remain unclear. (wikipedia.org)
  • imply
  • There has been an interpretation that brief notes in the Ancient Egyptian Ebers papyrus may imply schizophrenia, but other reviews have not suggested any connection. (wikipedia.org)
  • dementia
  • Philip Bromberg thinks that "dementia praecocissima" in some cases indistinguishable from childhoold schizophrenia, and Leo Kanner believed that "dementia praecocissima" includes a lot of pathological conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • mutations
  • The chance of a copying error in DNA replication during cell division increases with the number of cell divisions, and an increase in copying errors may cause an accumulation of mutations that are responsible for an increased incidence of schizophrenia. (wikipedia.org)