• seeds
  • Eat more omega 3 acids of olive oil, flaxseed, nuts and pumpkin seeds. (thinkhealthytips.com)
  • When I make this salad, I usually use pumpkin seeds, but I have had success with sunflower seeds, and I imagine that sliced almonds, chopped hazelnuts, or even pine nuts would work equally well. (thejoykitchen.com)
  • Sunflower seeds add a delicious nutty flavor and crunch to sandwiches, yogurt, salads, and soups. (urbanewomen.com)
  • An analysis of saltwort's peppercorn-sized seeds has revealed they are extremely nutritious, having high quantities of proteins, oils, and starches . (wikipedia.org)
  • As with many oil seeds, the protein is low in methionine. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is commercially cultivated for vegetable oil extracted from the seeds. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2013, global production of safflower seeds was 718,161 tonnes, with Kazakhstan accounting for 24% of the total. (wikipedia.org)
  • For the last fifty years or so, the plant has been cultivated mainly for the vegetable oil extracted from its seeds. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although many plant parts may yield oil, in commercial practice, oil is extracted primarily from seeds. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cottonseed oil is a cooking oil extracted from the seeds of cotton plants of various species, mainly Gossypium hirsutum and Gossypium herbaceum, that are grown for cotton fiber, animal feed, and oil. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hemp oil or hempseed oil is obtained by pressing hemp seeds. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mongongo nut oil (or manketti oil), from the seeds of the Schinziophyton rautanenii, a tree which grows in South Africa. (wikipedia.org)
  • Poppy seeds yield 45-50% oil. (wikipedia.org)
  • Like poppy seeds, poppyseed oil is highly palatable, high in vitamin E, and contains opium alkaloids such as morphine and codeine in quantities of up to 400 mg/L. Poppy seeds are notable for being especially high in tocopherols other than vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol). (wikipedia.org)
  • Grape seed oil (also called grapeseed oil or grape oil) is pressed from the seeds of grapes, and is thus an abundant by-product of winemaking. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although grape seeds contain polyphenols, such as proanthocyanidins, grape seed oil contains negligible amounts of these compounds. (wikipedia.org)
  • includes acid and base Baking soda - food base Balm, lemon - Balm oil[disambiguation needed]- Balsam of Peru - used in food and drink for flavoring Barberry - Barley flour - Basil (Ocimum basilicum) - Basil extract - Bay leaves - Beeswax - glazing agent Beet red - color (red) Beetroot red - color (red) Ben oil - extracted from the seeds of the moringa oleifera. (wikipedia.org)
  • COCONUT
  • Due to its high levels of saturated fat, the World Health Organization, the United States Department of Health and Human Services, United States Food and Drug Administration, American Heart Association, American Dietetic Association, British National Health Service, British Nutrition Foundation, and Dietitians of Canada advise that coconut oil consumption should be limited or avoided. (wikipedia.org)
  • Coconut oil can be extracted through dry or wet processing. (wikipedia.org)
  • The copra is pressed or dissolved with solvents, producing the coconut oil and a high-protein, high-fiber mash. (wikipedia.org)
  • The all-wet process uses raw coconut rather than dried copra, and the protein in the coconut creates an emulsion of oil and water. (wikipedia.org)
  • Proper harvesting of the coconut (the age of a coconut can be 2 to 20 months when picked) makes a significant difference in the efficacy of the oil-making process. (wikipedia.org)
  • Conventional coconut oil processors use hexane as a solvent to extract up to 10% more oil than produced with just rotary mills and expellers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Virgin coconut oil (VCO) can be produced from fresh coconut milk, meat, or residue. (wikipedia.org)
  • Producing it from coconut milk involves grating the coconut and mixing it with water, then squeezing out the oil. (wikipedia.org)
  • Coconut oil can also be extracted from the dry residue left over from the production of coconut milk. (wikipedia.org)
  • A thousand mature coconuts weighing approximately 1,440 kilograms (3,170 lb)[clarification needed] yield around 170 kilograms (370 lb) of copra from which around 70 litres (15 imp gal) of coconut oil can be extracted. (wikipedia.org)
  • Refined, bleached, and deodorized (RBD) oil is usually made from copra, dried coconut kernel, which is pressed in a heated hydraulic press to extract the oil. (wikipedia.org)
  • This yields practically all the oil present, amounting to more than 60% of the dry weight of the coconut. (wikipedia.org)
  • This crude coconut oil is not suitable for consumption because it contains contaminants and must be refined with further heating and filtering. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another method for extraction of coconut oil involves the enzymatic action of alpha-amylase, polygalacturonases, and proteases on diluted coconut paste. (wikipedia.org)
  • Unlike virgin coconut oil, refined coconut oil has no coconut taste or aroma. (wikipedia.org)
  • RBD coconut oil can be processed further into partially or fully hydrogenated oil to increase its melting point. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since virgin and RBD coconut oils melt at 24 °C (76 °F), foods containing coconut oil tend to melt in warm climates. (wikipedia.org)
  • The melting point of hydrogenated coconut oil is 36-40 °C (97-104 °F). In the process of hydrogenation, unsaturated fats (monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids) are combined with hydrogen in a catalytic process to make them more saturated. (wikipedia.org)
  • On food packaging, the term "vegetable oil" is often used in ingredients lists instead of specifying the exact plant being used, especially when the oil used is less desirable to the consumer or if a mix is used, such as palm, canola, soybean, and safflower oils, (whereas coconut oil and olive oil may be perceived as more desirable). (wikipedia.org)
  • Tropical oils, such as coconut, palm, and rice bran oils, are particularly valued in Asian cultures for high-temperature cooking, because of their unusually high flash points. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cooking oil is typically a liquid at room temperature, although some oils that contain saturated fat, such as coconut oil, palm oil and palm kernel oil are solid. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mayo Clinic has highlighted certain oils that are high in saturated fats, including coconut, palm oil and palm kernel oil. (wikipedia.org)
  • Coconut oil, a cooking oil, with medical and industrial applications as well. (wikipedia.org)
  • Azorubine - color (red) (FDA: Ext D&C Red #10) Babassu oil - similar to, and used as a substitute for coconut oil. (wikipedia.org)
  • grape see
  • Grape seed oil components are under study for their potential applications in human health, but the scientific quality of clinical research as of 2016 has been inadequate to suggest any effect on lowering disease risk. (wikipedia.org)
  • The following table lists a typical fatty acid composition of grape seed oil: Grape seed oil also contains 0.8 to 1.5% unsaponifiables rich in phenols (tocopherols) and steroids (campesterol, beta-sitosterol, stigmasterol). (wikipedia.org)
  • MARGARINE
  • A margarine made from naturally more saturated oils will be more plastic (more "spreadable") than a margarine made from hydrogenated soy oil[citation needed]. (wikipedia.org)
  • Products not labeled "vegetable oil margarine" do not have that restriction. (wikipedia.org)
  • Flavor
  • For a flavor-charged salad that is low in calories and high in healthful carbohydrates, modern American cooks could get some inspiration from the islands of Indonesia. (baltimoresun.com)
  • The MSG additive makes better flavor in store bought foods like frozen snacks, chips, frozen dinner, Chinese food, salad dressing and soups. (thinkhealthytips.com)
  • Flavor - while less flavorful oils command premium prices, some oils, such as olive, sesame, or almond oil, may be chosen specifically for the flavor they impart. (wikipedia.org)
  • Flavor base - oils can also "carry" flavors of other ingredients, since many flavors are due to chemicals that are soluble in oil. (wikipedia.org)
  • Refined hempseed oil is clear and colorless, with little flavor and lacks natural vitamins and antioxidants. (wikipedia.org)
  • A quality frying oil has a bland flavor, at least 200 °C (392 °F) smoke and 315 °C (599 °F) flash points, with maximums of 0.1% free fatty acids and 3% linolenic acid. (wikipedia.org)
  • Brazil nut oil contains 75% unsaturated fatty acids composed mainly of oleic and linolenic acids, as well as the phytosterol, beta-sitosterol, and fat-soluble vitamin E. Extra virgin oil can be obtained during the first pressing of the nuts, possibly for use as a substitute for olive oil due to its mild, pleasant flavor. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hazelnut oil, mainly used for its flavor. (wikipedia.org)
  • Macadamia oil, with a mild nutty flavor and a high smoke point. (wikipedia.org)
  • Walnut oil, used for its flavor, also used by Renaissance painters in oil paints. (wikipedia.org)
  • fatty
  • While we do need omega 6 fatty acids, we do not need to obtain them through dangerous rancid oils. (healthy-transitions.com)
  • The oil consists of mainly unsaturated fatty acids and is similar in both species, although the proportion of unsaturated to saturated fatty acids appears to be slightly higher in M. integrifolia (6.2:1 compared with 4.8:1). (wikipedia.org)
  • This fatty acid is mostly found in fish oils. (wikipedia.org)
  • They then refine the oil to remove certain free fatty acids to reduce susceptibility to rancidification. (wikipedia.org)
  • While full hydrogenation produces largely saturated fatty acids, partial hydrogenation results in the transformation of unsaturated cis fatty acids to unsaturated trans fatty acids in the oil mixture due to the heat used in hydrogenation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Like other long-chain fatty acid oils, cottonseed oil has a smoke point of about 450 °F (232 °C), and is high in tocopherols, which also contribute its stability, giving products that contain it a long shelf life, hence manufacturers' proclivity to use it in packaged goods. (wikipedia.org)
  • The oil is of high nutritional value because of its 3:1 ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 essential fatty acids, which matches the balance required by the human body. (wikipedia.org)
  • Compared with other culinary oils it is low in saturated fatty acids. (wikipedia.org)
  • The fatty acid and tocopherol constituents of the seed oil extracted from 21 grape varieties (Vitis spp. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aluminium - color (silver) Aluminium ammonium sulfate - mineral salt Aluminium potassium sulfate - mineral salt Aluminium silicate - anti-caking agent Aluminium sodium sulfate - mineral salt Aluminium sulfate - mineral salt Amaranth - color (red) (FDA: [DELISTED] Red #2) Note that amaranth dye is unrelated to the amaranth plant Amaranth oil - high in squalene and unsaturated fatty acids - used in food and cosmetic industries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Macadamia
  • Macadamia nut oil is a nice treat but can be expensive. (healthy-transitions.com)
  • Macadamia oil (or macadamia nut oil) is the non-volatile oil expressed from the nut meat of the macadamia (Macadamia integrifolia) tree, a native Australian nut. (wikipedia.org)
  • Macadamia oil is sometimes used in food as a frying or salad oil, and in cosmetic formulations as an emollient or fragrance fixative. (wikipedia.org)
  • Macadamia nuts contain over 75% of their weight as oil, the remainder is: 9.0% proteins, 9.3% carbohydrates, 1.5% moisture, 1.6% mineral matters and 2.0% fiber. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nutritive value (g/100g) of macadamia nuts roasted in oil and salted. (wikipedia.org)
  • Derivatives of macadamia oil in cosmetics include the light emollient ethyl macadamiate and water-soluble PEG-16 macadamia glycerides. (wikipedia.org)
  • Polarity of macadamia nut oil was found to be 525.50 nm±0.29 nm (SE). (wikipedia.org)
  • Macadamia oil is an excellent botanical replacement for mink oil in most applications. (wikipedia.org)
  • yogurt
  • Prepare your own sauce using plain yogurt, chopped cucumber, garlic and mint, or use a bottled, low-fat creamy salad dressing. (livestrong.com)
  • The yogurt is used as dressing for many salad or koshimbir dishes, to prepare cultured buttermilk or as a side dish in a thali. (wikipedia.org)
  • LARD
  • With this new invention, cottonseed oil began to be used for illumination purposes in lamps to supplement increasingly expensive whale oil and lard. (wikipedia.org)
  • A congressional investigation followed, and legislation was passed that required products fortified with cottonseed oil to be labeled as ''lard compound. (wikipedia.org)
  • high
  • Use margarines high in polyunsaturate oils, preferably those in the tub form. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • Final steps in refining include winterization (the removal of waxes), and deodorization by steam distillation of the oil at 232-260 °C (450-500 °F) under a high vacuum. (wikipedia.org)
  • In a high saucepan deep fry the onions in the 1/2 cup of safflower oil. (sparkpeople.com)
  • Oils suitable for this objective must have a high flash point. (wikipedia.org)
  • The hydrogenation process involves "sparging" the oil at high temperature and pressure with hydrogen in the presence of a catalyst, typically a powdered nickel compound. (wikipedia.org)
  • Vegetable oils are increasingly being used in the electrical industry as insulators as vegetable oils are not toxic to the environment, biodegradable if spilled and have high flash and fire points. (wikipedia.org)
  • the color is attributed to high levels of chlorophylls and carotenoids extracted into the oil. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] World War II caused high demand for the oil as a lubricant for the rapidly increasing number of steam engines in naval and merchant ships. (wikipedia.org)
  • Preservatives (antioxidants) are not necessary for high-quality oils that are stored properly. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therefore, palm oil can withstand deep frying at higher temperatures and is resistant to oxidation compared to high-polyunsaturated vegetable oils. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since about 1900, palm oil has been increasingly incorporated into food by the global commercial food industry because it remains stable in deep frying, or in baking at very high temperatures, and for its high levels of natural antioxidants. (wikipedia.org)
  • Grapeseed oil is high in polyunsaturates and low in saturated fat. (wikipedia.org)
  • triglycerides
  • This has supposedly been demonstrated in a small clinical study of 14 people, where the daily ingestion of flaxseed oil "resulted in a higher proportion of ALA" in serum cholesteryl esters and triglycerides as compared with the ingestion of hempseed oil. (wikipedia.org)
  • Vegetable oils are triglycerides extracted from plants. (wikipedia.org)
  • olives
  • Archaeological evidence shows that olives were turned into olive oil by 6000 BC and 4500 BC in present-day Israel and Palestine. (wikipedia.org)
  • meat
  • They can be served with quickly prepared sautes or steamed dishes of meat, poultry, fish, with salads, vegetables and even desserts. (chicagotribune.com)
  • Producing it from the fresh meat involves either wet-milling or drying the residue, and using a screw press to extract the oil. (wikipedia.org)
  • VCO can also be extracted from fresh meat by grating and drying it to a moisture content of 10-12%, then using a manual press to extract the oil. (wikipedia.org)
  • Initially, meat packers secretly added cottonseed oil to the pure fats, but this practice was uncovered in 1884. (wikipedia.org)
  • Procter & Gamble cornered the cottonseed oil market to circumvent the meat packer's monopoly on the price. (wikipedia.org)
  • paints
  • The latter is used in painting in the place of linseed oil, particularly with white paints, as it does not have the yellow tint which linseed oil possesses. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some oils are particularly suitable as drying oils, and are used in making paints and other wood treatment products. (wikipedia.org)
  • Due to its polymer-forming properties, hemp oil is used on its own or blended with other oils, resins, and solvents as an impregnator and varnish in wood finishing, as a pigment binder in oil paints, and as a plasticizer and hardener in putty. (wikipedia.org)
  • The oil has culinary and pharmaceutical uses, as well as long established uses in the making of paints, varnishes, and soaps. (wikipedia.org)
  • Particularly notable are its uses as a carrier for oil paints and as a pharmaceutical grade carrier for medicinal iodine and drugs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Painters prepared poppyseed oil by hand until the late 19th century, when oil paints became available prepared in tubes. (wikipedia.org)
  • While poppyseed oil does not cause as much yellowish tinting of paints as linseed oil, it dries slower and is less durable than linseed oil because the fat responsible for the yellowing also provides durability. (wikipedia.org)
  • mustard
  • Experiments on animals have pointed to the possibility that erucic acid, consumed in large quantities, may cause heart damage, although Indian researchers have published findings that call into question these conclusions and the implication that the consumption of mustard or rapeseed oil is dangerous. (wikipedia.org)
  • varieties
  • Hempseed oil is manufactured from varieties of Cannabis sativa that do not contain significant amounts of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive element present in the cannabis plant. (wikipedia.org)
  • formulations
  • Because of this property, it is used in some printing ink and oil paint formulations. (wikipedia.org)
  • These two formulations, and other similarly iodized poppyseed oils, also have multiple applications in the treatment of cancers and iodine deficiencies. (wikipedia.org)
  • characteristics
  • An oil may be hydrogenated to increase resistance to rancidity (oxidation) or to change its physical characteristics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rapeseed oil extracts were first put on the market in 1956-1957 as food products, but these suffered from several unacceptable characteristics. (wikipedia.org)
  • It has uses similar to linseed oil and characteristics similar to tung oil. (wikipedia.org)
  • Heating an oil changes its characteristics. (wikipedia.org)